Title of Presentation - Center Video

Title of Presentation - Center Video

Florida Safety Decision Making Methodology Present and Impending Danger, Child Vulnerability and Protective Capacity Module Objective D1: Extent of Maltreatment D6: Discipline or Behavior Management D5:

General Parenting Practices KNOW THE FAMILY D4: Adult Functioning D2: Surrounding Circumstances

s Ye D3: Child Functioning f a S e? o N

Safety Decision-Making Formula (1 of 2) Present or impending danger threats +/- Child vulnerability +/- Caregiver protective

capacity = Safe or Unsafe Foundation of Quality Decision Making? Information Standards Information Domains D1: Extent of Maltreatment

D6: Discipline or Behavior Management D5: General Parenting Practices KNOW THE FAMILY D4: Adult

Functioning D2: Surrounding Circumstances D3: Child Functioning Safety Decision-Making Formula (2 of 2) Present or impending danger threats

+/- Child vulnerability +/- Caregiver protective capacity = Safe

or Unsafe Definition of Safe Children are considered safe when there are no present or impending danger threats, or the caregivers protective capacities control existing threats. Definition of Unsafe Children are Unsafe when vulnerable to present or impending danger threats, and caregivers have insufficient

protective capacity to control existing threats. Three key concepts Safe or Unsafe Present or Impending Danger Threats Child Vulnerability Caregiver

Protective Capacity Present Danger (1 of 2) Immediate Significant Clearly Observable

Severe harm Present tenseright now Requires immediate response Examples of present danger (1 of 2)

Examples of present danger (2 of 2) Premeditated maltreatment Injuries to the face and head Life threatening living arrangements

Bizarre cruelty toward a child Child needing immediate medical care Caregiver unable to provide basic care Caregiver out of control or under the influence of substances posing an immediate danger threat to the child

Present danger assessment First Contact for all Investigations focus is on Present Danger IMMEDIATE RESPONSE! 24 hour or Immediate response?

Present danger can happen at any time CPI has responsibility Case Manager has responsibility Responsibility is to take actionprotective action

Present Danger (2 of 2) Impending Danger (1 of 4) Impending Danger... not happening at this moment but a state of danger Child is in a position of continual or pervasive danger

Impending Danger (2 of 4) Impending danger not as obvious Impending danger more prevalent Impending Impending Danger Danger Impending Impending Danger

Danger PRESENT Impending Impending Danger Danger Impending Impending Danger Danger DANGER Impending Impending Danger Danger

Impending Impending Danger Danger Examples of Impending Danger Impending Danger (3 of 4) Specific can be described Observable can be seen by you and others

Impending Danger (4 of 4) Imminentcould or likely will occur in the near term Require a controlling intervention Information reveals impending danger D1: Extent of Maltreatment

D6: Discipline or Behavior Management D5: General Parenting Practices KNOW THE FAMILY D4: Adult

Functioning D2: Surrounding Circumstance s reveals D3: Child Functioning Summary (Present Danger) Present or

impending danger threats +/- Child vulnerability +/- Caregiver protective capacity =

Safe or Unsafe Child Vulnerability (1 of 4) Children are vulnerable because they depend on others for protection and care Child Vulnerability (2 of 4) How does the child protect himself?

How does the child care for himself? Child Vulnerability (3 of 4) Information Domains give us the information we need to determine child vulnerability Age D1: Extent of Maltreatment

Physical ability Cognitive ability D6: Discipline or Behavior Management Developmental status Emotional security Family loyalty D5: General

Parenting Practices KNOW THE FAMILY D4: Adult Functioning D2: Surrounding Circumstances D3:

Child Functioning Child Vulnerability (4 of 4) Additional considerations of child vulnerability: prior impact of maltreatment childs isolation from the community childs ability to anticipate or judge danger childs ability to articulate problems or danger situations in which a childs own behavior provokes a dangerous reaction from a caregiver Vulnerability of every child

Our concerns about safety should involve all children in the household Summary (Child Vulnerability) Present or impending danger threats +/- Child vulnerability

+/- Caregiver protective capacity = Safe or Unsafe Definition of Protective Capacity Protective Capacity how a parent thinks,

feels, acts that makes him or her protective! Protective Capacities (1 of 2) Vigilant Protectiveness Cognitive Behaviora Emotional l Protective Capacities (2 of 2)

Cognitive Protective Capacity (1 of 2) Specific knowledge, understanding and perceptions that contribute to protective vigilance Cognitive Protective Capacity (2 of 2) Examples: understanding of protective role understanding and recognizing threats recognition of a childs needs reality oriented accurate perception of a child ability to accurately process and interpret

various stimuli intellectually able Behavioral Protective Capacity (1 of 2) Specific action, activity, performance that results in protective vigilance Behavioral Protective Capacity (2 of 2) Examples: physical capacity and energy impulse control ability to set aside own needs adaptive, assertive and responsive takes action

history of being protective Emotional Protective Capacity (1 of 2) Specific feelings, attitudes and identification with the child and motivation that results in protective vigilance Emotional Protective Capacity (2 of 2) Examples: emotional bond with the child positive attachment with the child love, sensitivity and empathy for the child resiliency stability effectively meets own emotional needs

emotional control Assessment of Protective Capacity Are caregivers protective? Who do we assess? Parents in the Household Adult Caregivers in the Household Safety Decision-Making ? Present or impending

danger threats ? Child vulnerability +/- +/- ? Caregiver protective

capacity = Safe or Unsafe Session Review Step 1 Gather sufficient information Weigh the information against our criteria for present & impending danger to determine if one or more exists Step 2

Determine child vulnerability to these identified threats, again using the sufficient information gathered Step 3 Determine if protective capacity exists to manage the specific identified threats Step 4 Step 5 Reach a decision about whether the child is safe or unsafe Upcoming e-Learning Module Unsafe!

Now what do we do? Safety planning Quiz Directions Q1: Which of the following best defines impending danger? a. c.

A child being in a state of danger due to parent/caregiver behaviors, attitudes, motives, emotions and/or situations posing a specific threat of severe harm to a child. An immediate, significant, and clearly observable family condition that is actively occurring or in process of occurring at the point of contact with a family and will likely result in serious harm to a child, therefore requiring a prompt CPS system response. The point at which a negative family condition gets worse. d. It is the same as present danger. b.

Q1: Which of the following best defines impending danger? a. b. A CHILD BEING IN A STATE OF PERVASIVE DANGER DUE TO A PARENTS BEHAVIORS, ATTITUDES, MOTIVES, EMOTIONS OR OUT OF CONTROL FAMILY CONDITIONS. An immediate, significant, and clearly observable family condition that is actively occurring or in process of occurring at the point of contact with a family and will likely result in serious harm to a child, therefore requiring a prompt CPS system response. c.

d. The point at which a negative family condition is identified. It is the same as present danger. Answer (a) best describes impending danger. Answer (b) is incorrect because it is the definition for present danger. Impending danger is not clearly observable and actively occurring upon first contact with the family, that is why sufficient information collection helps us recognize the more subtle, disguised out of control family conditions that produce impending danger threats. Answer (c) is incorrect because negative family conditions and circumstances related to impending danger are representative of clearly identifiable danger threats, not simply the risk of maltreatment. Answer (d) is incorrect because present and impending danger are separate and distinct types of danger threats. Q2: Caregiver protective capacities are: a. Family resources

b. General parenting practices including discipline and knowledge of child development c. Parenting strengths d. How a parent determines if their children are developing appropriately e.

Personal and parenting behaviors, cognitive, and emotional characteristics that specifically and directly associate with protecting ones child(ren) Q2: Caregiver protective capacities are: a. Family resources b. General parenting practices including discipline and knowledge of child development c.

Parenting strengths d. How a parent determines if their children are developing appropriately e. PERSONAL AND PARENTING BEHAVIORS, COGNITIVE, AND EMOTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS THAT SPECIFICALLY AND DIRECTLY ASSOCIATE WITH PROTECTING ONES CHILD(REN) The correct answer is (e). Answers (a), (c) and (d) while potentially useful information to have, are not specific enough, that is, are not directly associated with the caregivers ability to protect their child in the form of cognitive, behavioral or emotional assets to

qualify as protective capacities. Answer (b) is incorrect because it is a combination of the general parenting practice and disciplinary practice and behavior management information domains. Q3: The concept of impending danger recognizes that a child may be in a state of danger even though the threat is not immediate. a. True b. False Q3: The concept of impending danger recognizes that a child may be in a state of danger even though the threat is not immediate. a. TRUE b. False

Answer (a) is correct. While the threat is not immediate and actively occurring in your very presence the impending danger threat is generated from a pervasive state of out of control family conditions and is highly likely to occur in the imminent or very near future. Q4: When a danger threat has been identified in the home, only the alleged child victims vulnerability to the threat is assessed. a. True b. False Q4: When a danger threat has been identified in the home, only the alleged child victims vulnerability to the threat is assessed. a. True b. FALSE

Once a danger threat has been identified in the home, the vulnerability of all children is assessed, not just the alleged child victim making answer (b) the correct response. Q5: In terms of the identification and prevalence of danger threats . . . Present Danger is more prevalent but Impending Danger is typically more obvious. a. True b. False Q5: In terms of the identification and prevalence of danger threats . . . Present Danger is more prevalent but Impending Danger is typically more obvious. a. True b. FALSE

The correct answer is (b) false. It is just the opposite, by definition present danger is the more obvious in your face danger threat while the more subtle, but pervasive impending danger is much more prevalent in the familys that typically you will come into contact in your line of work. Congratulations! Module Two: Present and Impending Danger, Child Vulnerability and Protective Capacity Present Danger Course Registration To receive credit for this course, you will need to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. Log into FSFN. Click Create > Worker Training > Individual Training Plan. Click Search within the Assigned Training in Progress group box. Enter E-Learning 2: Present Danger (or simply enter E followed by *) and then click search. Click Select next to the course when it appears. Click Continue at the bottom of the page. When the selected course title is displayed on your Individual Worker screen,

indicate that the status is Completed and record the completion date. Click Save. This should then be displayed in your Individual Training History.

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