Supporting English Language Learners - New Jersey

Supporting English Language Learners - New Jersey

Supporting English Language Learners Module A: Meet Tsien Tsien 2013 data In 2014 there were 78,225 ELLs in NJ Schools 5.62% of the student population 4 A CLOSER LOOK

Hudson County had the largest population of ELLs in 2014 at Sussex County had the smallest population of ELLs in 2014 at

11,332 118 which was which was 12.96% .55% of its total student population.

of its total student population. Cumberland County 2,472 had ELLs in 2014 which was 8.81% of its total student population. 5 Meet Tsien Tsien

6 www.bing.com/videos/search?q=all+about+tibet&FO RM=HDRSC3&adlt=strict#view=detail&mid=D8809 C53BC9B2984772AD8809C53BC9B2984772A 7 Welcome to ABC School District What would you and your district colleagues do to smooth Tsien Tsiens transition to your school district?

What would you do for Tsien Tsien on day one, week one, and month one of her arrival? 8 Day One Week One Month One New Jersey Administrative Code (N.J.A.C. 6A:15) outlines the programmatic and administrative requirements for school districts

that enroll students who are English Language Learners. ( http://www.state.nj.us/education/c ode/current/title6a/chap15.pdf ) 10 Determining Eligibility www.state.nj.us/education/code/current/title6a/chap15.pdf N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.3 Identification of eligible English Language Learners (ELLs) a) The

district board of education shall determine at the time of enrollment the native language of each ELL. Each district board of education shall: 1. Initiate a home language survey 2. Develop a screening process (interviews, observations, assessments) 3. Administer a department-approved language proficiency assessment The screening shall be conducted by a bilingual/ESL or other certified teacher, and shall be designed to distinguish students who are proficient English speakers and need no further testing.

11 Language Proficiency Assessments www.state.nj.us/education/bilingual/resources/prof_tests.htm W-APT ACCESS 2.0 MODEL MAC II

IPT LAS LINKS CELLA 12 Determining Eligibility www.state.nj.us/education/code/current/title6a/chap15.pdf N.J.A.C.6A:15-1.3(b) The language proficiency assessment must measure the level of reading in English. In addition, the district must:

Look at the previous academic performance of students including their performance on standardized tests in English Review the input of teaching staff members responsible for the educational program for ELL students. The district board of education shall also use ageappropriate methodologies to identify ELL preschool students to determine their individual language development needs. 13 The Screening Process Interviews Observations

Assessments 14 Language Assistance Programs for English Language Learners There are three types of Language Assistance Programs: English Language Services (ELS) at least one but fewer than 10 ELL students. ELS shall be provided in addition to the regular school program. Any certified teacher can provide this instruction. English as a Second Language (ESL) at least one period of ESL instruction based on student language proficiency whenever

there are 10 or more ELL students. A certified ESL teacher must provide this instruction. Bilingual whenever there are 20 or more ELL students in any one language classification enrolled. A certified teacher with a bilingual endorsement can provide this instruction. ELL students are also entitled to tutoring, after school programs, summer programs, and remedial services as needed. N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.4 and 1.9 15 Bilingual Waiver Requests

A district may annually request a waiver from N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.5 Instructional program alternative Must demonstrate impracticality 16

Alternative Programs that use Students Native Language The following are alternative programs of instruction for bilingual students in districts where there is no full-time bilingual program available: Bilingual Part-time Bilingual Resource Bilingual Tutorial These alternative program(s) must be taught by a certified teacher(s) with bilingual endorsement. 17

Alternative Programs that are English Based The following are alternative programs of instruction for bilingual students in districts where there is no full-time bilingual program available: High-Intensity ESL ESL certified teacher(s) Sheltered Instruction content area certified staff with Sheltered Instruction training 18

N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.13 Parent Notification 1. 2. 3. Parent Notification a) By mail b) Include a statement that the parents may decline their childs enrollment c) In writing and in the language in which the parent(s) possesses a primary speaking ability, and in English Progress Reports

a) Same manner and frequency as progress reports are sent to parent(s) of other students enrolled in the school district b) Written in English and in the native language of parent(s) of students enrolled in the bilingual and ESL program Exit a) Notify the parent(s) when students meet the exit criteria and are placed in a monolingual English program. The notice shall be in English and in the language in which the parent(s) possesses a primary speaking ability 19 Parent Notification Requirements No

later than 30 days after the beginning of the school year. If a child has not been identified as ELL prior to the beginning of the school year, then the parents must be notified within two weeks of the child's placement in a language instruction educational program. 20

Parent Notification Requirements The notice shall include: Why the child was identified as ELL and why the child needs to be placed in a language instructional educational program that will assist the child to develop and attain English proficiency and meet state standards; The child's level of English proficiency, how such level was assessed, and the child's academic level; The method of instruction that will be used to serve the child, including a description of other methods of instruction available and how those methods differ in content, instructional goals, and the use of English and a native language, if applicable; How the program will meet the specific needs of the child

in attaining English and meeting state standards; 21 Parent Notification The program'sRequirements exit requirements, the expected rate of transition into a classroom not tailored for ELL students, and, in the case of high school students, the expected rate of graduation; How the instructional program will meet the objectives of an individualized education program of a child with a disability; Written guidance on the rights that parents have to remove their child from a program upon their request, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.13, or to choose another program or method of instruction, if available, and how parents will be

provided assistance in selecting the best program to serve their child. Outreach to parents must include information on: How parents can become involved in the education of their children; and How they can actively participate in helping their children learn English, achieve at high levels in the core academic subjects and meet state standards. 22 Other Parental Considerations Outreach also must include regular meetings for parents and notices of such meetings to parents

so that parents have the opportunity to provide suggestions and recommendations. All information must be provided to the parents of an ELL child in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, in a language that the parent can understand. 23 Title III Parent Notification Resources www.state.nj.us/education/bilingual/title3/accountability/n

otification/ www.state.nj.us/education/bilingual/resources/ www.isbe.net/bilingual/htmls/amao_parent_letters.htm www.state.nj.us/education/bilingual/resources/Title3ParentInvol vement.pdf 24 Dear Colleagues Civil Rights Letter Civil Rights Letter - http://www2.ed.g ov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/collea gue-el-201501.pdf

A child cannot be admitted to or excluded from participating in a federally assisted education program on the basis of a surname or language-minority status. 25 Dear Colleagues Civil Rights Letter LEP parents must be given access (in their native language) to information brought to the attention of on-LEP parents, including:

ELL programs Special education information IEP meetings Grievance procedures Notices of nondiscrimination Student discipline policies and procedures Registration/enrollment Report cards Requests for parent permission for activities

Parent-teacher conferences Parent handbooks Gifted and talented Magnet and charter schools 26 Now go back to your Day One, Week One, Month One chart: Are your plans aligned to N.J.A.C. 6A:15-1.3; 1-4 and 1-13?

Make revisions, if necessary. 27 End of Module A 28 Contact Information Please email [email protected] with any questions or comments you may have regarding this module.

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