Student Growth Goals The Nuts and Bolts for

Student Growth Goals The Nuts and Bolts for

Student Growth Goals The Nuts and Bolts for Superintendents Presenter Dr. Lauri Leeper Warm-Up Which of these BEST represents your feeling on using measures of student progress (Student Growth Goals) as a part of teacher evaluation? Ferris wheel Roller coaster Milk bottle knock em down game Bumper cars

Todays Objectives The Nuts and Bolts 1. Leave in a better position to understand: the complexities of getting SGGs right, the importance of getting SGGs right, and the support that principals and teachers need to do it right. 2. Realize that there are two ways to implement SGGs: as a state add-on requirement letter of the law, or properly and fully as a catalyst for deep and rich teacher and school improvement. Handout 2 Which of these do effective teachers do? plus one! Assess students to determine their instructional levels and clarify their academic needs Set instructional goals for students Design strategies and identify resources to address identified needs

Monitor and assess student progress throughout the school year and adjust instruction accordingly Work cooperatively with colleagues to share professional expertise Formalize this process so that the teachers effectiveness can be documented and acknowledged Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? Focus on Student Results TEACHING PROCESSES STUDENT RESULTS Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? Explicitly Connect Teaching and Learning

LEARNING TEACHING Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? Improve Instructional Practices Instruction Curriculum Assessment Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? Looking at student data

Formative assessment Professional Development Differentiation Lesson plans Best practices Common planning Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? FRAMEWORK FOR COHERENCE Looking

at student data Best practice s Professional Development Formative assessment Differentiation Student Growth Goals Lesson

plans Common planning Handout 2 Why Student Growth Goals? Focus on Student Results Explicit Teaching and Learning Connection Improved Instructional Practices

Framework for Coherence School Improvement and Student Success Handout 2 What does research say about student growth goals and student achievement? Review of Research: Two Facts and a Fib 18-41 percentage point gains when teachers set and communicate clear goals for learning Formative assessment in the classroom can result in

increases in student learning up to half a grade level 2 grade levels Schools that show multiple years of improvement use data to make decisions and encourage teachers to use student learning data to make instructional decisions Handout 3 What does research say about student growth goals and student achievement? Review the studies that support student growth goals. Which ones resonate with you? Why? Discuss these with your table mates. Handout 3-4

The Student Growth Goal Process Nuts and Bolts Handout 4 Is your cholesterol at goal? What is the need? What is the goal? What are we going to do to get to the goal? How are we going to know if we are making progress toward the goal? How will we know if we met the goal? Student Growth Goal Process Step 1: Step 2: Step 3:

Step 4: Step 5: Determine needs. Create specific learning goal based on preassessment. Create and implement teaching and learning strategies. Monitor progress

through ongoing formative assessment. Determine whether the students attained the goal. Handout 4 Step 1: Determine Needs Step 1: Step 2: Step 3:

Step 4: Step 5: Determine needs. Create specific learning goal based on preassessment. Create and implement teaching and learning strategies. Monitor progress

through ongoing formative assessment. Determine whether the students attained the goal. Handout 4 STEP 1: Determine Needs A. Determine your focus. Handout 4 Determine Your Focus Which subject(s) or class(es) will you choose?

How broad/narrow will your focus be? What are the essential skills in the content area? Handout 4-5 How do we determine focus? Data from previous years Rising students previous scores Trend data for grade level/subject area Curricular needs District vision or mission Other Handout 5 Sunshine Middle School: 6th Grade Math Four 6th grade math teachers Beginning of each year, they analyze the combined 5th grade end-of-year assessment

results from elementary-feeder schools Handout 5 Sunshine Middle School - Grade 6 Use the Grade 5 End of Year Assessment Combined Results What trends and patterns do you notice? What implications does this have for 6th grade mathematics instruction? Handout 5-7 STEP 1: Determine Needs B. Choose the assessment(s) to measure your focus.

Handout 7 How Do We Determine What PreAssessments to Use? Emphasis on tests with higher validity and reliability Must be able to show progress in skills or content What is already in place? Assessment examples on pages 8-10 Handout 7 Teacher Example: Emma Euclid Sunshine Middle School Grade 6 Math Teacher Rationale for Student Growth Goal Reviewed Grade 5 End of Year Assessment Combined

Results for feeder schools. Determined: upcoming students generally do well with computation and estimation, strand analysis shows difficulty with other subject areas that use problem-solving, and baseline data analysis indicates students especially struggle with open-ended, or short answer questions. Problem solving will be our focus for this SGG. Handout 11 Baseline Data Administered grade-level appropriate word problem. Graded student responses using the Mathematics Problem Solving rubric. Analyzed results. Handout 11-14 Example Baseline Problem

Ms. Lewis bought two MP3 albums for $13.35 each and three DVDs for $11.99 each. These prices include tax. She gave the cashier $75.00. How much change should Ms. Lewis have? Why choose this problem? From example practice 5th grade assessment Can be solved in a variety of ways Can be represented visually Handout 11-14 Baseline Data Baseline Data 4 44 Advanced 1/25 (4%)

52 Benchmark 11/25 (44%) Intensive Benchmark Advanced Intensive 13/25 (52%) Handout 16 Baseline Data: Disaggregated Averages by Component and Level Component Intensive Students (out of 3 possible)

Benchmark Students (out of 3 possible) Advanced Students (out of 3 possible) Everyone (out of 3 possible) Conceptual Understanding 0.77 1.45

3 1.16 Strategies and Reasoning 0.62 1.64 2 1.12 Computation and Execution 0.92

2.09 3 1.52 Communication 0.46 1.18 3 0.88 Insights 0.38 1.27

3 0.88 Handout 16 Step 1: Determine Needs Teacher Action Steps for Step 1. A. Determine focus B. Choose assessment(s) to measure focus area. To Do: With your table mates, discuss consideration/concerns and brainstorm specific actions you can take to support principals and administrative leaders in Step 1. (What, Why, Who, When, and How) Consider both A and B. Be prepared to share out. Handout 17-18

Step 2: Create the Student Growth Goal Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Determine needs Create specific learning goal based on

preassessment Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment Determine whether students achieved the SGG

Handout 19 KDE Requirements for SGGs Must have a proficiency/achievement component Must have a growth component Must be SMART Handout 19 Which picture represents achievement? Which represents progress? Progress (Growth) vs. Achievement (Proficiency) SGGs PROGRESS/GROWTH Students will score X% greater on the post-test than on the pre-test. OR Students will increase

their performance by X performance level on the rubric. ACHIEVEMENT/ PROFICIENCY X% of students will achieve a score of X or higher. Handout 19 What Makes SGGs SMART? Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound Handout 19

SPECIFIC The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. Handout 20 MEASURABLE An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. The goal is measurable and uses an appropriate instrument. Handout 20 APPROPRIATE The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. The goal is standards-based and directly related to the subject and students that the

teacher teaches. Handout 20 REALISTIC The goal is attainable. The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. Handout 20 TIME-BOUND The goal is contained to a single school year/course. The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG

During the current school year, every student will make measureable progress in mathematical problem solving, as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. SMART SGGs are: Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound

Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG: Specific During the current school year, all students will make measurable progress in mathematical problem solving as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG: Measurable During the current school year, all students will make

measurable progress in mathematical problem solving as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG: Appropriate During the current school year, all students will make measurable progress in mathematical problem solving as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher

level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG: Realistic During the current school year, all students will make measurable progress in mathematical problem solving as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Example SMART SGG: Time-bound During the current school year, all students will make

measurable progress in mathematical problem solving as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 20 Step 2: Create SGG Teacher Action Steps for Step 2. A. Analyze data from assessments. B. Create SGG that is SMART and includes both growth and proficiency. To Do: With your table mates, discuss consideration/concerns and brainstorm specific actions you can take to support

principals and administrative leaders in Step 2. (What, Why, Who, When, and How) Consider both A and B. Be prepared to share out. Handout 21-22 Step 3: Implement Teaching and Learning Strategies Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Determine

needs Create specific learning goal based on preassessment Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment

Determine whether students achieved the SGG Handout 23 Too Many Ideas? The problem is not a resistance to innovation but the fragmentation, overload, and incoherence resulting from the uncritical and uncoordinated acceptance of too many different innovations. (Fullan & Stiegelbauer, 1991, p. 197) Is this still a valid statement today? Do you agree or disagree? STEP 3: Create and Implement Teaching and Learning Strategies How do we know if strategies are effective

and how do we know which are the MOST effective? Handout 23 How Do We Know If Strategies Are Effective? One group receives the strategy or treatment and another group does not Results of student learning are then compared Handout 23 Strategies & Average Percentile Gain on Achievement* Identifying similarities and differences Summarizing and note taking Reinforcing effort and providing recognition Homework and practice Nonlinguistic representations

Cooperative learning Setting objectives and providing feedback Generating and testing hypothesis Questions, cues, and advance organizers Building vocabulary Percentile Gain 45 34 29 28 27 27 23 23 22 20 Interactive games

20 Student discussion/chunking 17 Strategies *Haystead , M. W. & Marzano, R. J. (2009). Meta-Analytic Synthesis of Studies Conducted at Marzano Research Laboratory on Instructional Strategies Handout 23 Strategies & Average Percentile Gain on Achievement* Strategies Feedback Instructional Quality Instructional Quantity Direct Instruction Graded homework

Acceleration Remediation/feedback Personalized instruction Challenge of goals Peer Tutoring Mastery Learning Questioning Advance Organizers Simulation and games Computer-assisted instruction Instructional media Percentile Gain 37 34 30 29 29 27 24 21

20 19 19 16 14 13 12 12 *Hattie, J (2009). Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Handout 24 STEP 3: Create and Implement Teaching and Learning Strategies Tips for Writing Instructional Strategies Handout 24 Writing Instructional Strategies

Strategies should be Within the teachers ability to control Research-based/ high-yield When possible Linked specifically to the SGG Measurable Handout 24 For Strategies, Consider WHY was this strategy chosen? WHO will be included in the strategy and WHEN? HOW will the strategy be implemented? Handout 24

Review Emmas Strategies Did she choose effective strategies? Are they high yield strategies Can she improve the effectiveness of the strategies that she chose? Would you have chosen others? Why? Handout 25 Emmas Strategies for Teaching and Learning Strategy Evidence To address the students communication skills, students will give feedback on their understanding of mathematical concepts by responding in a math journal at least 3x a week during independent work time. I will read and respond to the journals and use the information to plan small group instruction.

Lesson plans; student math journals To address insights, each Friday student homework will be to note 3 everyday situations in which they would use math to solve their problem. Student homework To address conceptual understanding and strategy & reasoning, as part of their Do Now work each morning, students will generate hypotheses on the most efficient strategy to solve a problem, then test their hypothesis by solving. We will compare strategies as a whole group to determine the most efficient. Student Do Now work; lesson plans Handout 25

Step 3: Create and Implement Teaching and Learning Strategies Teacher Action Steps for Step 3. A. Select strategies based on student data. B. Implement strategies as designed. To Do: With your table mates, brainstorm considerations/ concerns and discuss specific actions you can take to support principals and administrative leaders in Step 2. (What, When, Why, and How) Consider both A and B. Be prepared to share out. Handout 26-27 Step 4: Monitor Progress Step 1: Determine needs

Step 2:Create specific learning objective based on preassessment Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies

Monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment Determine whether students achieved the SGG Handout 28 Steps in a Mid-Year Review Process Step 1 Collect and reflect on informal and

formal midyear data Step 2 Reflect on progress toward SGG Step 3 Reflect on effectiveness of strategies Step 4 Adjust strategies Handout 28 Emmas Mid-year Review Review Emmas mid-year data. (Discuss with your table mates.) Are Emmas students making progress?

How are her strategies working? Does she recommend adjusting or discontinuing instructional strategies? Handout 28-30 Emmas Strategies for Teaching and Learning Strategy 1 Communication Skills Students give feedback in a math journal 3x a week Read/respond and use information to plan small group instruction. Outcome 1 Mid-Year: Student average has gone from 0.88 to 1.60 Effective Also having students conduct peer conferences in which they use the rubric to identify strengths and weaknesses of each others journal entries. Grade one self-chosen problem per week using the rubric.

Handout 30 Emmas Strategies for Teaching and Learning Strategy 2 Insights Friday homework students note 3 everyday situations in which they use math to solve their problem Outcome 2 Mid-Year: Student average has gone from 0.88 to .92 Not Effective Many students using same or similar problems Now requiring 1 problem a week with a strategy and answer Problems that score a 2 or 3 using the rubric used on a review, quiz, or homework

Handout 30 Emmas Strategies for Teaching and Learning Strategy 3 Conceptual Understanding and Strategy & Reasoning Do Now work - students generate hypotheses - most efficient strategy to solve a problem Test hypothesis by solving Compare strategies as a whole group for most efficient. Outcome 3 Mid-Year: Student average has gone from 1.16 to 1.62 CU Effective Student average has gone from 1.16 to 1.76 S&R Effective

December, began quick-checking student work when finished Pairing high and low to debrief Handout 30 Step 4: Monitor Progress through On-going Formative Assessment Teacher Action Steps for Step 4. A. Monitor and make decisions regarding strategies (continue, adjust, discontinue) based on student data obtained through formative assessment. B. Participate in mid-year conference (if required). To Do: With your table mates, brainstorm considerations/ concerns and discuss specific actions you can take to support principals and administrative leaders in Step 4. (What, When, Why, and How) Consider both A and B. Be prepared to share out. Handout 31-32

Step 5: Determine SGG Achievement Step 1: Determine needs Step 2:Create specific learning objective based on preassessment Step 3: Step 4: Step 5: Create and

implement teaching and learning strategies Monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment Determine whether students achieved the SGG Handout 33 Implementing Decision Rules for SGG

Attainment KDE Requirements for Student Growth Goals Must have one SGG in an academic year Can have no more than two SGGs in an academic year SGGs are rated as High, Expected, or Low Summative student growth rating includes three years (when available) Handout 34 Implementing Decision Rules for SGG Attainment Local Decision: Incorporating other measures for student growth consideration Handout 34 Emmas SGG During the current school year, every student will make

measureable progress in mathematical problem solving, as measured by the district rubric. Students will improve their scores as follows: All students will improve by at least one level. Students at Level zero will increase by two levels. Students scoring at Level 3 will be rescored on a higher level rubric and will increase their performance by at least one level. Seventy percent of students will be at Level 2 by years end. Handout 33 Decision Rules Student Progress Student Growth Goal High

Expected Low Growth Component Growth Component Growth Component 90 percent of students meet or exceed the SGG growth component Proficiency Component Exceeds beyond 10 percent 70%-89% of

students meet or exceed the SGG growth component Less than 70% of students meet the SGG growth component Proficiency Component Expected Growth: +/- 10 percent Proficiency Component Did not meet and fell lower than 10 percent FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Handout 34 Emmas SGG Results Growth Component - 76% meet SGG Proficiency Component - 68% are proficient at Level 2 Are Emmas results: High Expected Low Handout 34 Emmas SGG Rating Growth Component 76% is within the Expected range of 70%-89% Proficiency Component 70% 68% is within the Expected range (63%-77%) = +/-10% Emma receives an Expected rating on Student Progress Handout 34

Considerations for Decision Rules 1. How are the proficiency and growth portions of the SGG synthesized for an overall rating on an SGG? 2. How are multiple SGGs synthesized into one overall summative rating? Lets Practice and Question Handout 34 Ratings on Standard 7 Simulations Simulation 1 Twelfth-Grade English Teacher Simulation 2 Seventh-Grade Social Studies Teacher Simulation 3 Elementary School Physical Education Teacher Handout 35

Decision Rules Student Progress Student Growth Goal High Expected Growth Component Growth Component 90 percent of students meet or exceed the SGG growth component

Proficiency Component Exceeds beyond 10 percent 70%-89% of students meet or exceed the SGG growth component Low Growth Component Less than 70% of students meet the SGG growth component Proficiency Component Expected Growth: +/- 10 percent

Proficiency Component Did not meet and fell lower than 10 percent FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY Handout 36 Overall SGG Rating H E H H E

E E E L L L E L E H

PROFICIENCY Example 1: Growth Component = High Proficiency Component = Expected Overall SGG Rating = High Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Proficiency) GROWTH GROWTH Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Growth) H E

E H E L E H L L E E L

E H PROFICIENCY Example 1: Growth Component = High Proficiency Component = Expected Overall SGG Rating = Expected Handout 36 Overall SGG Rating H E H

H E E E E L L L E L E

H PROFICIENCY Example 2: Growth Component = Expected Proficiency Component = Low Overall SGG Rating = Expected Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Proficiency) GROWTH GROWTH Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Growth) H

E E H E L E H L L E

E L E H PROFICIENCY Example 2: Growth Component = Expected Proficiency Component = Low Overall SGG Rating = Low Handout 37 Overall SGG Rating H E

H H E E E E L L L E

L E H PROFICIENCY Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Proficiency) GROWTH GROWTH Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Growth) H

E E H E L E H L L E E

L E H PROFICIENCY Example 3: Growth Component = Expected Proficiency Component = High Example 3: Growth Component = Expected Proficiency Component = High Overall SGG Rating = Expected Overall SGG Rating = High

Handout 37 Overall SGG Rating H E H H E E E E L

L L E L E H PROFICIENCY Example 4: Growth Component = Low Proficiency Component = Expected Overall SGG Rating = Low Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on

Proficiency) GROWTH GROWTH Overall SGG Rating (Decision Weighting Heaviest on Growth) H E E H E L

E H L L E E L E H PROFICIENCY Example 4: Growth Component = Low

Proficiency Component = Expected Overall SGG Rating = Expected Handout 37 Comparison of Growth and Proficiency Matrices Outcomes Growth Proficiency High/Low Expected Expected High/Expected High

Expected High/High High High Expected/Low Expected Low Expected/Expected Expected Expected Expected/High

Expected High Low/Low Low Low Low/Expected Low Expected Low/High Expected

Expected Ratings on Standard 7 Simulations Simulation 1 Twelfth-Grade English Teacher Simulation 2 Seventh-Grade Social Studies Teacher Simulation 3 Elementary School Physical Education Teacher Handout 38-40 Considerations for Decision Rules Other Measures of Student Progress 1. How are the proficiency and growth portions of the SGG synthesized for an overall rating on an SGG? 2. How are multiple SGGs synthesized into one overall summative rating? 3. If using other measures, how are these synthesized into an overall summative rating?

Handout 41 Other Measure for Student Progress Other Measures Student Progress High Other indicators of student achievement/ progress indicate exemplary student performance. Expected Other indicators of student achievement/ progress indicate ontarget student

performance. Low Other indicators of student achievement/ progress indicate inconsistent student performance. Handout 41 Step 5: Determine Whether Students Achieved SGG Action Steps for Step 5. A. Apply district decision rules to SGG. B. Analyze success of SGG and next steps for the future. To Do: With your table mates, brainstorm considerations/ concerns and discuss specific actions you can take to support principals and administrative leaders in

Step 5. (What, When, Why, and How) Consider both A and B. Be prepared to share out. Handout 42-43 Recommendations and Implementation Ideas Lessons Learned from the Field Handout 44 Recommendation 1 Districts that have been successful in implementing SGGs have involved teachers in leadership positions and have invited participation in the adoption and implementation of the SGG process from the beginning. How might your district go about doing this? Handout 44 Recommendation 2

Collaboration is key to successfully implementing the SGG process. How might you encourage this? Handout 44 40 Recommendation 3 There are many challenges when implementing SGGs for the first time. How might your district embrace naysayers? Handout 44 40 Recommendation 4 Districts that have successfully adopted SGGs house SGG training materials, libraries of SGGs, and other pertinent information on an information website so that those not able to attend trainings

have the information available to them. What other ideas do you have to keep SGG information readily accessible in your district? Handout 44 40 Recommendation 5 One challenge when implementing SGGs is to analyze data purposefully. How might district leaders go about helping in this area? Handout 44 40 At the End A New Beginning - First Steps 1. Review your Action Steps and think about the Recommendations and Implementation Ideas. 2. Create a list of follow-on actions to take back to

your district. What are first steps? How about timelines? How about responsibilities? He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying. - Friedrich Nietzsche Handout 45 Questions?

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