MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17TH CHAPTER 4

MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17TH CHAPTER 4

MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17TH CHAPTER 4 Biodiversity and Evolution Core Case Study: Why Should We Protect Sharks? 400 known species

6 deaths per year from shark attacks 79-97 million sharks killed every year Fins Organs, meat, hides Fear 32% shark species threatened with extinction

Keystone species Cancer resistant Threatened Sharks Fig. 4-1, p. 80 4-1 What Is Biodiversity and Why Is It Important? Concept 4-1 The biodiversity found in genes, species, ecosystems, and ecosystem processes is vital to sustaining life on earth.

Biodiversity Is a Crucial Part of the Earths Natural Capital (1) Species: set of individuals who can mate and produce fertile offspring 8 million to 100 million species 1.9 million identified Unidentified are mostly in rain forests and oceans Biodiversity Is a Crucial Part of the Earths Natural Capital (2) Species diversity

Genetic diversity Ecosystem diversity Biomes: regions with distinct climates/species Functional diversity Biodiversity is an important part of natural capital Classifying Homo Sapiens Supplement 5, Fig. 2, p. S19 Natural Capital: Major Components of

the Earths Biodiversity Fig. 4-2, p. 82 Functional Diversity The biological and chemical processes such as energy flow and matter recycling needed for the survival of species, communities, and ecosystems. Heat Chemical

nutrients (carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, minerals) Heat Heat Decomposers (bacteria, fungi)

Heat Solar energy Ecological Diversity The variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems found in an area or on the earth.

Producers (plants) Consumers (plant eaters, meat eaters) Genetic Diversity The variety of genetic material within Heat

Species Diversity The number and abundance of species present in different communities. Fig. 4-2, p. 82 Two Species: Columbine Lily and Great Egret Fig. 4-3, p. 82 Genetic Diversity Fig. 4-4, p. 83

Major Biomes Fig. 4-5, p. 84 Denver San Francisco Coastal mountain ranges

Coastal chaparral and scrub Las Vegas Sierra Nevada St. Louis

Great American Desert Coniferous forest Baltimore Rocky Mountains

Desert Great Plains Coniferous forest Mississippi Appalachian River Valley Mountains

Prairie grassland Deciduous forest Fig. 4-5, p. 84 Science Focus: Have You Thanked the Insects Today? Bad rep: sting us, bite us, spread disease, eat our

food, invade plants Pollination: lets flowering plants reproduce sexually Free pest control: insects eat other insects We need insects more than they need us Importance of Insects Fig. 4-A, p. 83 Individuals Matter: Edward O. Wilson: A Champion of Biodiversity Loved bugs as a kid

Specialized in ants Widened scope to earths biodiversity Theory of island biogeography First to use biodiversity in a scientific paper Edward O. Wilson Fig. 4-B, p. 85 4-2 How Does the Earths Life Change Over Time? Concept 4-2A The scientific theory of evolution

explains how life on earth changes over time through changes in the genes of populations. Concept 4-2B Populations evolve when genes mutate and give some individuals genetic traits that enhance their abilities to survive and to produce offspring with these traits (natural selection). Biological Evolution by Natural Selection Explains How Life Changes over Time (1) Fossils Physical evidence of ancient organisms Reveal what their external structures looked like

Fossil record: entire body of fossil evidence Only have fossils of 1% of all species that lived on earth Fossilized Skeleton of an Herbivore that Lived during the Cenozoic Era Fig. 4-6, p. 86 Biological Evolution by Natural Selection Explains How Life Changes over Time (2)

Biological evolution: how earths life changes over time through changes in the genetic characteristics of populations Darwin: Origin of Species Natural selection: individuals with certain traits are more likely to survive and reproduce under a certain set of environmental conditions Huge body of evidence Evolution of Life on Earth Supplement 5, Fig. 2, p. S18

Evolution by Natural Selection Works through Mutations and Adaptations (1) Populations evolve by becoming genetically different Genetic variations First step in biological evolution Occurs through mutations in reproductive cells Mutations: random changes in DNA molecules Evolution by Natural Selection Works through Mutations and Adaptations (2) Natural selection: acts on individuals

Second step in biological evolution Adaptation may lead to differential reproduction Genetic resistance: ability of one or more members of a population to resist a chemical designed to kill it Evolution by Natural Selection Fig. 4-7, p. 87 (a) A group of bacteria,

including genetically resistant ones, are exposed to an antibiotic (b) Most of the normal bacteria die (c)

The genetically resistant bacteria start multiplying (d) Eventually the resistant strain replaces all or most of the strain affected by the antibiotic

Normal bacterium Resistant bacterium Fig. 4-7, p. 87 A group of bacteria, including genetically resistant ones, are exposed to an antibiotic Normal

bacterium Most of the normal bacteria die The genetically resistant bacteria start multiplying Eventually the resistant strain replaces the strain

affected by the antibiotic Resistant bacterium Stepped Art Fig. 4-7, p. 87 Case Study: How Did Humans Become Such a Powerful Species? Strong opposable thumbs

Walk upright Complex brain Adaptation through Natural Selection Has Limits Adaptive genetic traits must precede change in the environmental conditions Reproductive capacity Species that reproduce rapidly and in large numbers are better able to adapt Three Common Myths about Evolution

through Natural Selection 1. Survival of the fittest is not survival of the strongest 2. Organisms do not develop traits out of need or want 3. No grand plan of nature for perfect adaptation 4-3 How Do Geological Processes and Climate Change Affect Evolution? Concept 4-3 Tectonic plate movements, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and climate change have shifted wildlife habitats, wiped out large numbers of

species, and created opportunities for the evolution of new species. Geologic Processes Affect Natural Selection Tectonic plates affect evolution and the location of life on earth Locations of continents and oceans have shifted Species physically move, or adapt, or form new species through natural selection Earthquakes

Volcanic eruptions Movement of the Earths Continents over Millions of Years Fig. 4-8, p. 89 225 million years ago Fig. 4-8, p. 89 135 million years ago

Fig. 4-8, p. 89 65 million years ago Fig. 4-8, p. 89 Present Fig. 4-8, p. 89 225 million years ago

65 million years ago 135 million years ago Present Stepped Art Fig. 4-8, p. 89 Climate Change and Catastrophes Affect Natural Selection

Ice ages followed by warming temperatures Collisions between the earth and large asteroids New species Extinctions Changes in Ice Coverage in the Northern Hemisphere During the last 18,000 Years Fig. 4-9, p. 89 18,000 years before

present Northern Hemisphere Ice coverage Modern day (August) Legend Continental ice Sea ice Land above sea level

Fig. 4-9, p. 89 Science Focus: Earth Is Just Right for Life to Thrive Temperature range: supports life Orbit size: moderate temperatures Liquid water: necessary for life Rotation speed: sun doesnt overheat surface Size: gravity keeps atmosphere 4-4 How Do Speciation, Extinction, and

Human Activities Affect Biodiversity? Concept 4-4A As environmental conditions change, the balance between formation of new species and extinction of existing species determines the earths biodiversity. Concept 4-4B Human activities can decrease biodiversity by causing the extinction of many species and by destroying or degrading habitats needed for the development of new species. How Do New Species Evolve? Speciation: one species splits into two or more

species Geographic isolation: happens first; physical isolation of populations for a long period Reproductive isolation: mutations and natural selection in geographically isolated populations lead to inability to produce viable offspring when members of two different populations mate Geographic Isolation Can Lead to Reproductive Isolation Fig. 4-10, p. 91

Adapted to cold through heavier fur, short ears, short legs, and short nose. White fur matches snow for camouflage. Arctic Fox Northern population Early fox population

Different environmental conditions lead to different selective pressures and evolution into two different species. Spreads northward and southward and separates

Gray Fox Southern population Adapted to heat through lightweight fur and long ears, legs, and nose, which give off more heat. Fig. 4-10, p. 91 Extinction is Forever Extinction

Biological extinction Local extinction Endemic species Found only in one area Particularly vulnerable Background extinction: typical low rate of extinction Mass extinction: 3-5 over 500 million years Golden Toad of Costa Rica, Extinct

Fig. 4-11, p. 92 Science Focus: Changing the Genetic Traits of Populations Artificial selection Use selective breeding/crossbreeding Genetic engineering, gene splicing Consider

Ethics Morals Privacy issues Harmful effects Artificial Selection Fig. 4-C, p. 92 Desired trait (color)

Cross breeding Pear Apple Offspring Best result Cross breeding

New offspring Desired result Fig. 4-C, p. 92 Genetically Engineered Mice Fig. 4-D, p. 92 4-5 What Is Species Diversity and Why

Is It Important? Concept 4-5 Species diversity is a major component of biodiversity and tends to increase the sustainability of ecosystems. Species Diversity: Variety, Abundance of Species in a Particular Place (1) Species diversity Species richness: The number of different species in a given area Species evenness:

Comparative number of individuals Species Diversity: Variety, Abundance of Species in a Particular Place (2) Diversity varies with geographical location The most species-rich communities Tropical rain forests

Coral reefs Ocean bottom zone Large tropical lakes Variations in Species Richness and Species Evenness Fig. 4-12, p. 93 Global Map of Plant Biodiversity Supplement 8, Fig. 6, p. S36

Science Focus: Species Richness on Islands Species equilibrium model, theory of island biogeography Rate of new species immigrating should balance with the rate of species extinction Island size and distance from the mainland need to be considered Edward O. Wilson Species-Rich Ecosystems Tend to Be

Productive and Sustainable Species richness seems to increase productivity and stability or sustainability, and provide insurance against catastrophe How much species richness is needed is debatable 4-6 What Roles Do Species Play in an Ecosystem? Concept 4-6A Each species plays a specific ecological role called its niche. Concept 4-6B Any given species may play one or more of five important rolesnative, nonnative,

indicator, keystone, or foundationin a particular ecosystem. Each Species Plays a Unique Role in Its Ecosystem Ecological niche, niche Pattern of living: everything that affects survival and reproduction Water, space, sunlight, food, temperatures Generalist species Broad niche: wide range of tolerance

Specialist species Narrow niche: narrow range of tolerance Specialist Species and Generalist Species Niches Fig. 4-13, p. 95 Number of individuals Specialist species with a narrow niche

Niche separation Generalist species with a broad niche Niche breadth Region of niche overlap Resource use

Fig. 4-13, p. 95 Specialized Feeding Niches of Various Bird Species in a Coastal Wetland Fig. 4-14, p. 96 Black Black skimmer skimmer seizes seizes small

small fish fish at water surface at water surface Flamingo feeds on minute organisms in mud

Brown pelican dives for fish, Avocet Avocet sweeps sweeps bill bill which it locates through through mud mud and and from the air

surface surface water water in in search search of of small small crustaceans, crustaceans, insects, insects, and

and seeds seeds Scaup and other diving ducks feed on mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic vegetation Louisiana

heron wades into water to seize small fish Herring gull is a tireless scavenger Dowitcher Dowitcher probes probes

deeply deeply into into mud mud in in search search of of snails, snails, marine worms, marine worms, and

and small crustaceans small crustaceans Oystercatcher feeds on clams, mussels, and other shellfish into which it pries its narrow beak Knot (sandpiper)

picks up worms and small crustaceans left by receding tide Ruddy Ruddy turnstone turnstone searches searches under

under shells shells and and pebbles pebbles for for small small invertebrates invertebrates Piping plover

feeds on insects and tiny crustaceans on sandy beaches Fig. 4-14, p. 96 Case Study: Cockroaches: Natures Ultimate Survivors 3500 species Generalists Eat almost anything

Live in almost any climate High reproductive rates Cockroach Fig. 4-15, p. 96 Species Can Play Five Major Roles within Ecosystems Native species Nonnative species

Indicator species Keystone species Foundation species Indicator Species Serve as Biological Smoke Alarms Indicator species Provide early warning of damage to a community Can monitor environmental quality

Trout Birds Butterflies Frogs Case Study: Why Are Amphibians Vanishing? (1) Habitat loss and fragmentation Prolonged drought Pollution

Increase in UV radiation Parasites Viral and fungal diseases Climate change Overhunting Nonnative predators and competitors Case Study: Why Are Amphibians Vanishing? (2) Importance of amphibians Sensitive biological indicators of environmental changes

Adult amphibians Important ecological roles in biological communities Genetic storehouse of pharmaceutical products waiting to be discovered Red-Eyed Tree Frog and Poison Dart Frog Fig. 4-17a, p. 98 Keystone Species Play Critical Roles in Their Ecosystems

Keystone species: roles have a large effect on the types and abundances of other species Pollinators Top predators Case Study: Why Should We Care about the American Alligator? Largest reptile in North America 1930s: Hunters and poachers Importance of gator holes and nesting mounds: a keystone species 1967: endangered species

1977: comeback, threatened species American Alligator Fig. 4-18, p. 99 Foundation Species Help to Form the Bases of Ecosystems Create or enhance their habitats, which benefit others Elephants Beavers

Three Big Ideas 1. Populations evolve when genes mutate and give some individuals genetic traits that enhance their abilities to survive and to produce offspring with these traits (natural selection). 2. Human activities are decreasing the earths vital biodiversity by causing the extinction of species and by disrupting habitats needed for the development of new species. Three Big Ideas

3. Each species plays a specific ecological role (ecological niche) in the ecosystem where it is found.

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