Preparing For Change New SEN legislation and what

Preparing For Change New SEN legislation and what

Preparing For Change New SEN legislation and what this means for the strategic management of schools and front line teaching staff Jane Friswell CEO nasen JaneF @nasen.org.uk The new arrangements and you This will have a different impact in different settings Think about how you work now Do you rely on a process-driven model; having to evidence failure after a period of time to access appropriate support? Do you have more control and fluidity in provision? The emphasis must be about greater control; more immediate, proactive provision and less reaction to a prescribed period of failure how well placed are you? The PfC list.Spring & Summer Term 2014 Children & Families Bill Timing Children & Families Bill receives Royal Assent SEN Code of Practice published Transitional arrangements published Funding formula for 2014-15 applies Implications for Schools & Academies

Preparatory work on Local Offer, under current regulations Key staff, governors become familiar with SEN Code of Practice Training for staff on key changes: SEN Support; focus on outcomes; increased participation of parents and children and young people with SEN; increased awareness of most effective interventions Preparatory work for new school information requirements Part 4 Education Act 1996 & 2001 SEN Code of Practice apply The PfC list.From September 2014 Children & Families Bill Timing Implications for Schools & Academies Implementation of Children and Families Bill Pupils with SEN requiring assessment will have an EHC Assessment and be considered for an EHC plan New SEN Code of Practice takes effect Implementation of 2014 national curriculum in line with inclusion

statement Implement SEN Code of Practice: review provision for pupils on school action/school action plus, put in place new SEN support for them and for pupils with newly identified SEN Implement SEN information requirements Develop partnerships with post-16 providers to support transition planning January 2015 school census: record all pupils receiving SEN support, both those who have an EHCP and those who do not Transitional arrangements apply Preparatory work on Local Offer : How might it look? AREA WIDE OFFER Local Area mission Statement/SEN Policy Detailed information - LA expectations of education providers including Early years settings, schools, colleges and training providers INFORMATION ABOUT SEN SERVICES OR PERSONS WHICH THE LA COMMISSIONS How to access targeted and specialist services, the criteria and how decisions are made Page with individual services responses to questions that represent information that parents/young people most frequently want to know Links to web information about the services, include providers outside of the area but that the LA commissions INDIVIDUAL SETTING / SCHOOL / COLLEGE SEN INFORMATION Page with individual providers responses to questions that represent information that parents / young people most

frequently want to know or link to, where this can be accessed e.g. school website Links to individual early years settings / schools / colleges websites (set out by phase) Include providers outside of the area but that the local authority expects children and young people from its area will use Ref: SE7 Pathfinder Services EHC Plans Travel Support and Advice: parents & Support and Advice: Children & young Concerns/ dispute Mediation & appeals Key staff, governors become familiar with SEN Code of Practice Chapter 6: Early years, schools, colleges and other education and

training providers The Graduated Approach Key requirements: Use their best endeavours to ensure that the necessary provision is made for any individual who has SEN Co-operate generally with their local authority in developing the local offer 6. Early years, schools, colleges and other education and training providers Teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of pupils in their class. High quality, personalised differentiated teaching is the first step in responding to pupils who may have

SEN. The majority of pupils can make progress through such teaching What the Code says about schools : Graduated Approach Schools should regularly review the quality of teaching for pupils at risk of underachievement This includes reviewing teachers understanding of strategies to identify and support vulnerable pupils and their knowledge of SEN most frequently encountered

The quality of teaching for pupils with SEN and the progress made by pupils should be a core part of the schools performance management arrangements and its approach to professional development for all teaching and support staff Where pupils continue to make inadequate progress, despite highquality teaching targeted at their areas of weakness, the class teacher, working with the SENCO should assess whether the child has a significant learning difficulty For higher levels of need, schools should have arrangements in place to draw upon more specialised assessments from external agencies and professionals. These arrangements should be agreed and set out as part of the Local Offer

The identification of SEN should be built into the overall approach to monitoring the progress and development of pupils Class and subject teachers supported by the senior leadership team, should make regular assessments of progress for all pupils. Where pupils are falling behind or making

inadequate progress given their age and starting point they should be give additional support The graduated approach: the link between assessment & teaching Do we collect accurate information about pupils attainment and the progress that they make? Do we identify pupils who are making less than expected progress and are unlikely on current performance to attain at an expected or higher level? Do we moderate the assessment of pupils attainment levels and target setting in a rigorous way? Do we accurately monitor the progress of these children on a regular basis? Do we monitor support arrangements to show that they are effective in increasing the rate of progress and narrowing the

gap for identified pupils? Do we review support arrangements regularly with regard to their impact on pupils outcomes, and make changes if they are ineffective? Do we have arrangements in place for the pupils to increase their progress and raise their attainment? Assess Review Plan Do 6. Early years, schools, colleges and other education and training providers Do we have specific strategies in place for working in a partnership with parents for the benefit of pupils, including those who find working with school to be difficult? In schools with best practice, it is not automatically accepted that a pupil achieving below the level

expected for their age or making slower progress than expected will have a special educational need requiring additional or different provision. Instead, teachers, together with a SENCO, will analyse the effectiveness of their teaching systems for support before deciding that the identification of SEN is appropriate. These schools will actively seek to improve provision to meet a wider range of needs through well differentiated classroom and subject teaching rather than assuming that it always needs to introduce specialist additional provision. What does the graduated approach mean for schools? In schools with best practice, it is not automatically accepted that a pupil achieving below the level expected for their age or making slower progress than expected will have a special educational need requiring additional or different provision. Instead, teachers, together with a SENCO, will analyse the effectiveness of their teaching systems for support before deciding that

the identification of SEN is appropriate. These schools will actively seek to improve provision to meet a wider range of needs through well differentiated classroom and subject teaching rather than assuming that it always needs to introduce specialist additional provision. Once a potential special educational need is identified, four types of action should be taken to put effective support in place. These actions form part of a cycle through which earlier decisions and actions are revisited, refined and revised with the growing understanding of

pupils needs and of what supports the pupil in making good progress and securing good outcomes More detailed assessment More frequent reviews More specialised expertise More personalised programme Inspectors will expect that teaching and support will be of at least good quality given the relationship between teaching and pupils progress in the evaluation schedule reflecting the view

that assessment and teaching should be regarded as intrinsically connected and not separate activities. Good practice in the identification and assessment of pupil needs is a prerequisite for developing and sustaining good quality SEN provision in schools and related settings. This practice underpins high aspirations for pupil achievement Four key elements of good practice: What would it look like for children and young people with SEND as part of the graduated approach? A whole school ethos that respects individuals differences, maintains high expectations for all and promotes good communication between teachers, parents and pupil 1 A whole school focus on the teaching of all pupils which provides a range high quality, effective teaching and learning interventions as a continuum of whole school provision where all pupils need are met A teaching & learning policy which equips children & young people to learn

independently Universal high quality teaching and high expectations for all A whole school culture which values and gives high priority to parental engagement. The Governing body provides support and challenge around the progress of all groups of pupils and about the effectiveness of approaches to narrowing the gaps Whole school policies which take account of the effort of pupils & young people with SEND as well as their achievement, have well established assessment for learning in place and a marking policy which all children and young people understand and know how to use to make progress towards their next steps. Staff are well equipped to know what to do when they notice that a child or young person is struggling or not making progress. All teachers take responsibility for differentiating appropriately and making effective use of resources Knowledgeable and sensitive teachers who understand the processes of learning and the impact that SEND can have on these What would this look like?

2 Creative adaptations to classroom practice enabling children with special needs to learn inclusively and meaningfully, alongside their peers 3 What would this look like? Most pupils make good progress. Regular tracking & monitoring highlights when a pupil is not making progress. Teachers know what action to take when they notice that a pupil is struggling Staff have access to additional learning programmes and resources to support development of key skills and strategies for independent learning Access to additional learning programmes and resources to support the development of key skills and strategies for independent learning when assessment indicates that the pupil is not making progress 4

Additional SEN provision A few pupils receive specialised provision: this will be a longer term provision for those few pupils whose needs are so specialised, that they require the skills of a specialist teacher or group of professionals to be involved. The majority of these pupils time is spent in the mainstream classroom but their additional and different provision is highly personalised and closely monitored. The class /subject teachers are clear how to encourage independence and boost these pupils self esteem. This provision may come from within the school or from outside the school (ie a collaboration with other schools or the LA Local Offer) Additional SEN provision Some pupils receive additional SEN provision from well trained staff who are highly effective: this is a specific, time limited, evidence based intervention for pupils who are not making good progress due to a special educational need. Schools will have developed professionals within school (or through a cluster of schools) who can support these students. The pupils response to the intervention will provide teachers with an indication of how significant the SEN is likely to be Additional SEN teaching informs and supports Universal teaching Universal provision Additional SEN teaching informs and supports Quality First Teaching OFSTED 2010

Teachers presented information in different ways to ensure all children and young people understood Children and young people learnt best when: Teachers adjusted the pace of the lesson to reflect how children and young people were learning Assessment was secure, continuous and acted upon The effectiveness of specific types of support was understood and the right support was put in place at the right time Lesson structures were clear and familiar but allowed for adaptation flexibility

Respect for individuals was reflected in high expectations for their achievement The staff understood clearly the difference between ensuring children and young people were learning and keeping them occupied All aspects of a lesson were well thought out and any adaptations needed were made without fuss to ensure that everyone in class had access Teachers subject knowledge was good, as was their understanding of pupils needs and how to help them Which flags are confidently waving in your whole school

approach? OFSTED 2010 Expectations of disabled children and young people and those who had SEN were low The roles of additional staff were not planned well or additional staff were not trained well and the support provided was not monitored sufficiently Children and young peoples learning was least successful when: Activities and additional interventions were inappropriate and were not evaluated

in terms of their effect on children and young peoples learning Communication was poor: teachers spent too much time talking, explanations were confusing, feedback was inconsistent, language was too complex for all children and young people to understand the tone and even body language used by adults was confusing for some of the children and young people, who found social subtleties and nuances difficult to understand Resources were poor, with too little thought having been given to their selection and use Teachers did not

spend enough time finding out what children and young people already knew or had understood Teachers were not clear about what they expected children and young people to learn as opposed to what they expected them to do How many hazards can you identify for your school? Children and young people had little engagement in what they were learning, usually as a result of the above features Effective Whole School Provision is characterised by: high aspirations for the achievement of all pupils

good teaching and learning for all pupils provision based on careful analysis of need, close monitoring of each individuals progress and a shared perception of desired outcomes evaluation of the effectiveness of provision at all levels in helping to improve opportunities and progress leaders who looked to improve general provision to meet a wider range of need rather than always increasing additional provision swift changes to provision, in and by individual providers and local areas, as a result of evaluating achievement and well-being OFSTED 2010: The Special Educational Needs and Disability Review; A Statement is Not Enough Key Questions Do we have high aspirations for all of our pupils? Do we provide at least good teaching for all our pupils? Is our provision for pupils based on a careful analysis of needs and a monitoring of their progress in relation opportunities and outcomes? Do we evaluate the effectiveness of all our provision to meet a wide range of pupil needs? Does our school leadership team consider how to make the best provision for a wide range of pupils needs? Do we make timely changes to provision for pupils where evaluation indicates this is required? Training for staff on key changes Whole Approach to Access, Participation & Achievement

www.nasen.org.uk Launch at Nasenlive 21 May Nasen providing a one-stop-shop of all that staff need to know relating to SEND, March 2014 Nasenlive 2014, premier CPD event for SEND, Bolton, 21-22 May IDP materials, www.nasen.org.uk Advanced training materials for SEND www.nasen.org.uk Nasen Guide for SENCOs preparing for school inspection Newly updated 2nd Edition Comprehensive guidance Practical and pragmatic Provides the key considerations of SEND for the whole school Helpful templates Case studies Dont reinvent the wheel Free with membership! Key Questions for you Today; what is on your to do list? How confident are you in your whole school approach to identifying and meeting the needs of pupils with SEND? Is every teacher in your school, a teacher of every child? Are you able to strategically lead and resource the changes reform brings? Are you prepared to lead by example and apply the bananarama

principle? Will you be the first to implement change in your classroom/to test out new approaches? Challenges & Opportunities for Implementation Assessment and Planning Nasen is the leading organisation in the UK which aims to promote the education, training, advancement and development of all those with special and additional support needs. If you are a member, thank you and please access all that your membership offers If you are not a member, consider joining and accessing the support to promote and develop a Whole School Approach to SEND www.nasen.org.uk Jane Friswell, CEO, nasen [email protected] www.nasen.org.uk Tel: 01827 311500 0784 0756 109

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