First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement

First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement

First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Reading Comprehension as an Integrative Learning Strategy in a Philosophy Learning Community Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Chelsie Hawkinson & Dr. Rita Sperry Texas A&M University Corpus Christi First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Context Texas A&M University Corpus Christi Learning Communities Program Statement

of Problem Two Semester Requirement Literature Review Contextualized Approach LC Redesign Integrative Learning Focus Evidence of Success Discussion References Pilot Philosophy Learning Community in Fall 2014 Community of Practice in May 2015 First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References

Philosophy Dyad SLOs TAMUCC CORE CURRICULUM, PHILOSOPHY, AND SEMINAR: Critical Thinking CRITICAL THINKING 1 - Generate and communicate ideas by combining, changing, or reapplying existing information. CRITICAL THINKING 2 Gather and assess information relevant to a question. CRITICAL THINKING 3 Analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information. PHILOSOPHY: Understand important themes, movements, and figures in the history of philosophy. First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem: Reading Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Students were

struggling with assigned readings. Quiz grades were poor. Students had difficulty understanding threshold concepts in Philosophy lecture. First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Quiz Grades: Fall 2014 & Spring 2015 25 20 15 Fall 2014

Spring 2015 10 5 Discussion References 0 F D C B A First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Aliteracy and Reading Compliance

Aliteracy - coined by Mikulecky (1978) and picked up by Tanner in 1987 Students choose not to read because they do not really see a purpose for it in their lives Burchfield and Sappington (2000) Reading Compliance Study conducted between 1981 and 1997; reading compliance dropped from above 80% to below 20% Estimated that, on average, only about one-third of students complete daily reading assignments Factors Leading to Noncompliance First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read

Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Starcher and Proffitt (2011) Evidence of Success Discussion References Lack of motivation Lack of knowledge of study habits Competing demands on time Disconnect between instructor objectives for students and student objectives for the course Professor behavior Bradley (2007) Classroom practices (lecturing over the readings, ignoring them entirely) reinforce noncompliance [S]tudents are smart and know what they are doing by reading

or not reading (p. 7). First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Methods to Improve Reading Compliance Reading Quizzes Course Preparation Assignmen ts Are grades enough of a motivator? Monte Carlo Quiz (Fernald, 2004) Just-in-Time

and Online Quizzes (Howard, 2004; Marcell, 2008) Written Responses (Yamene, 2006) Two-Point System (Solomon, 1979) Gambrells (1996) Reward Proximity Hypothesis Reading Questions (Henderson & Rosenthal, 2006) First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence

of Success Discussion References Community of Practice Course Redesign First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Philosophy: Reading Quizzes 10 quizzes for 20% of final grade Varied format Development of Learning Guides First-Year of College: Getting Them to

Read Statement of Problem Seminar: Learning Guides Learning Guide Assignment Literature Review More Guidance LC Redesign Student Evaluation of Reading Processes Evidence of Success Discussion References Release of Responsibility First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Learning Guide Assignment Learning Guide: Bertrand Russell The Value of Philosophy

Respond to the following questions while reading. Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Time and Place Questions 1. Who is the writer?** 2. When and where are they writing?** Content Questions 3. Why does Russell think standard criticisms about the aims of philosophy are wrong? 4. Define the practical man. 5. Discuss the aim of philosophy. 6. How does philosophy differ from the natural sciences. 7. Explain Russells claim that the value of philosophy is found in its uncertainty. 8. What value does Russell see in philosophical contemplation? 9. Explain what Russell means by the self and the not-self. 10. Relate the value of studying philosophy to an individuals behavior. Metacognition Questions 11. Name the opposing viewpoints that the author presents in the writing. 12. Name one thing you agree with in the writing. 13. Name one thing you disagree with in the writing. ** Use the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy to answer these questions. Do not worry about citing the encyclopedia. First-Year of College: Getting Them to

Read Seminar Guidance Making predictions. The actual reading The reading process Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign High quality talk about texts Content Metacognition What it says (summarization) and what it does (purpose/functio n) statements. Evidence of Success Discussion References Questioning the author Visual representations of the text

First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Seminar Guidance First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Evaluation

Learning Guide Reflection & e-Portfolio DueFriday, October 14 by 5:00 pmto Seminar Blackboard 10% of Seminar Grade For the first part of the semester, you have been asked to complete multiple learning guides to prepare you for lecture and lecture quizzes. These learning guides were intended to motivate you to read before coming to class. For your e-Portfolio, upload all of the following to the submission link on Blackboard. 1. Your reflection based on the guided questions below. 2. The Learning Guide you feel demonstrates your best work. 3. The Learning Guide you feel demonstrates your worst work. Answer the following questions in your midterm reflection: 1. Considering the learning guide that demonstrates your best work: a. Why do you believe this demonstrates your best work? b. What were your reading strategies when completing this learning guide? Describe step-by-step what you did to complete the guide. c. How did the completion of this learning guide help you understand the philosophical concepts associated with the content? 2. Considering the learning guide that demonstrates your worst work: a. Why do you believe this demonstrates your worst work? b. What were your reading strategies when completing this learning guide? Describe step-by-step what you did to complete the guide. (Be honest.) c. What could you do to better understand the philosophical concepts associated with the content in cases like this? 3. What reading strategies work best for you? 4. In your experience, what are the benefits of reading material for class before coming to lecture? Was your performance on the quizzes enhanced? What were the disadvantages of the learning guides, if any? 5. How did the learning guides enhance your preparation and performance on major assignments, including the Philosophy of Mind Presentation and Exam One? 6. How will you make sure to keep track of reading before class when you are not required to complete a learning guide? 7. Please provide general feedback about the learning guide assignments. What did you like about the assignment? What did you like less about the assignment? How could you improve this assignment for future students? Your reflection should be written in essay format with an introduction, body paragraphs that include topic sentences and transitions, and a conclusion that brings everything together. Follow APA guidelines for formatting (12-pt Times New Roman, double-spaced, 1 margins, cover page, no abstract).

First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Change in Release of Responsibility Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Duke and Pearsons (2002) Gradual Release of Responsibility Quantitative Results: Quiz Averages First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read 60.0% Statement of Problem Literature Review

50.0% 40.0% Fall 14 Spring 15 Fall 15 Spring 16 Fall 16 30.0% LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% A B C D F Quantitative Results: Final Averages First-Year

of College: Getting Them to Read Final Average Comparison 60.0% Statement of Problem 50.0% Literature Review Percent LC Redesign 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% Evidence of Success 10.0% Discussion References 0.0% Fall 2014

Average: 70.94 GPA: 1.7 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Average: 72.15 GPA: 2.0 Average: 75.17 GPA: 2.4 Average: 77.39 GPA: 2.4 First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Qualitative Themes Reading Comprehension Statement of Problem Literature Review Assignment Improvement

Reading Before Lecture LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Release of Responsibility Time Consideration First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Reading Comprehension I really liked the learning guides because they made me feel more confident about the concepts that were in the readings.

I truthfully found the readings interesting and the learning guides helped me better understand [the readings] and I liked that about them I liked the fact that the questions made me actually go back and read. Going back and rereading made me get a better grasp on the whole reading... because of the learning guides, I am doing extremely well and I think they are a great thing to have in the class First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Reading Before Lecture Reading the material before coming to class really helps me stay focused while the teacher is talking because I already have general knowledge of the subject so the class acts as a reinforcement as well as an elaboration of concepts. It is just a lot easier to understand the content after hearing it explained by [the professor]. It gives me a chance to clear up anything I might have missed reading it myself. In my experience, there are multiple benefits of reading the material

before lecture. It is just a lot easier to understand the content after hearing it explained by [the professor]. It gives me a chance to clear up anything I might have missed reading it myself. Reading the material before coming to class really helps me stay focused while the teacher is talking because I already have general knowledge of the subject so the class acts as a reinforcement as well as an elaboration of concepts. I believe if I know some of what is going to be discussed before class it helps me focus more on what the professor is talking about rather than just take notes. First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Time Consideration I only didnt like the learning guides because they could be time consuming The only disadvantage I had was that they were time consuming and kind of a pain but I knew they were benefiting me in the end. Honestly, I despised having to do the learning guides, but now I notice the huge impact they had on

my studies and for that I am grateful. First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review Release of Responsibility I think starting [the learning guides] in seminar together is a good way to teach everyone how to approach the assignment and then making us to it on our own gives a good idea of how we really understand what is going on and how to apply those skills. LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Learning guides have been an important part of comprehending the core material for philosophy, and helped in the improvement of my personal study habits. First-Year of College: Getting Them to

Read Statement of Problem Assignment Improvement Encourage more group work and learning, which helped me to retain more from the readings. Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References It would be helpful if we didnt just receive a grade for our learning guides and in class or seminar we went over the questions on the guide. First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Discussion Statement of Problem Literature Review LC

Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References Easy Addition to a Course If we paid more attention to reading on the college level, what might happen? One of the many benefits of working in an LC First-Year of College: Getting Them to Read Statement of Problem Literature Review LC Redesign Evidence of Success Discussion References References American Association of Colleges and Universities (2014). Reading VALUE rubric. VALUE: Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education. Washington D.C.: American Association of Colleges and Universities. Bradley, K. (2007). Reading noncompliance: A case study and reflection. MountainRise, 4(1). Retrieved from

http://www.wcu.edu/facctr/mountainrise/archive/vol4no1/html/bradley.pdf Burchfield, C. M., & Sappington, J. (2000). Compliance with required reading assignments. Teaching of Psychology, 27(1), 58-60. Bean, J. (2011). Engaging ideas: The professors guide to integrating writing, critical thinking, and active learning in the classroom (2nd ed). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons. Duke, N.K. & P. David Pearson. (2002). Effective practices for developing reading comprehension. In A.E. Farstrup & S.J. Samuels (Eds.) What Research Has to Say About Reading Instruction (3rd ed., pp. 205242). Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Farnald, P. S. (2004). The Monte Carlo Quiz: Encouraging punctual completion and deep processing of assigned readings. College Teaching, 52(3), 95-99. Gambrell, L. (1996). Creating classroom cultures that foster reading motivation. The Reading Teacher, 50, 425. Henderson, C., & Rosenthal, A. (2006). Reading questions: Encouraging students to read the text before coming to class, Journal of College Science Teaching, 35(7), 46-50. Howard, J. R. (2004). Just-in-Time teaching in Sociology or how I convinced my students to actually read the assignment. Teaching Sociology, 32(4), 385-390. Marcell, M. (2008). Effectiveness of regular online quizzing in increasing class participation and preparation. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 2(1), 1-9. Mikulecky, L. (1978, May). Aliteracy and a changing view of reading goals. Paper presented at the International Reading Convention, Houston, TX. Solomon, P. R. (1979). The Two-Point System: A method for encouraging students to read assigned material before class. Teaching of Psychology, 6(2), 77-80. Starcher, K., & Proffitt, D. (2011). Encouraging students to read: What professors are (and arent) doing about it. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 23(3), 396-407. Tanner, R. (1987, March). Teaching freshmen non-readers: The a-literate majority. Paper presented at the 38th Annual Meeting of the Conferences on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA. Yamene, D. (2006). Course Preparation Assignments: A strategy for creating discussion-based courses. Teaching Sociology, 34(3), 236-248.

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