GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR CONTNOUS SCHOOL

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR CONTNOUS SCHOOL

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR CONTNOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN Hedi Belkaoui, Director of School Improvement & Accreditation New Leaders Meeting: November 13, 2018 Office of Catholic Schools Archdiocese of Chicago Sharing the Loaves and (sign of the cross) Fishes Sharing the loaves and fishes, You gave us an image of solidarity with the hungry, O Lord. Sharing yourself in the bread and wine, You called all to the table, O Lord.

Give me the hunger to be a part of the feeding and the healing of this world. Nourish me with your Grace, So I may work with joy to serve your children. Open my eyes and my heart to recognize those in poverty And increase my awareness of the structures and systems That need to be changed Workshop Objectives Objective 1- Discuss the process to identify instructional strategies that can address the skills that challenge students Objective 2- Discuss the process to identify an assessment plan to monitor the CSIP Objective 3- Discuss the alignment between professional development and the CSIP Objective 4- Identify key tasks in adjusting instruction

as a result of the CSIP Objective 5- Define a process to adjust instruction in response to assessment results Objective 6- Distinguish between technical challenges and adaptive challenges Why are we even here today? Human Tower My WHY! There are things that I can do that you cannot do. There are things that you can do that I

cannot do. But together, we can do anything. Mother Theresa Yo cannot u do it alone! Katherine K. Merseth 2017 My WHY! with research The main in-school influence on

student achievement is the quality of the teacher and teaching The quality of an education system can not exceed the quality of its teachers. McKinsey. (2007). How the worlds bestperforming schools come out on top ACADEMI IMPROVEMENT C GOALS 20182019

Archdiocese of Chicago Academic Improvement Goalsand Math Reading 1. Student are to learn the Archdiocese of Chicago Curricular Benchmarks in English/language arts and math as measured by meeting or exceeding ACT Aspire College Readiness Benchmarks: ready or exceeding 2. Student growth from one year to the next is high or Katherine K. Merseth 2017 Instructional Guidance: Three Components

Organization of Curriculum Do you have a common curriculum that forms a coherent base of knowledge and skills? Learning Opportunities for Students Do you have organizational systems needed to advance instructional goals Quality of Instruction

Do you have a common language and school-wide understanding of high quality rigorous instruction? Katherine K. Merseth 2017 If you do nothing else Strong Instructional Practices The primary responsibility of school principals is their continuous focus on improving instructional work in the classrooms (Bryk, et al., p. 47) Workshop Objectives Objective

1- Discuss the process to identify instructional strategies that can address the skills that challenge students the most CSIPPart 4 Key Tasks Identify the skills to target for improvement Decide on instructional strategies Agree on what the plan will look like in classrooms Put the plan in writing in the CSIP CSIP Part 4. Strand and Benchmark Identification Teacher teams identify the skills for the CSIP Step 1.Meet in grade-level

teams: Team 1: Pre-K to Grade 3 Team 2: Grade 4 and Grade 5 (Grade 6 can be in Team 2) Team 3: Grade 6, Grade 7, and Grade 8 (can be just Grade 7 and Grade 8) Step 2. Grade-level teams identify ONE to TWO that will be documented on the CSIP A. Access the Curriculum Benchmark Report and the Complexity Report for a grade. B. Silently, review the skills for the strand that is targeted for improvement. Utilize both the priority standards as well as the lowest performing area on ACT ASPIRE 5th Grade DOMAIN: ReadingStandards for Literature OCSCode:

Strand: Key Ideas and Details (KID) Rating 5.RL.KID.1 1. Quoteaccurately froma textwhenexplainingwhatthetextsaysexplicitly andwhendrawinginferences fromthetext. Priority 5.RL.KID.1.1.b 5.RL.KID.1.2.b 5.RL.KID.2 5.RL.KID.2.1.c 5.RL.KID.2.2.b 5.RL.KID.2.3.b 5.RL.KID.2.4.c

5.RL.KID.3 5.RL.KID.3.1.b 5.RL.KID.3.2.b OCSCode: Determine the meaning of a text by using quotes from a story, drama, or poem Locate quotes that reflect explicit details in a story, drama, or poem 2. Determinea themeof a story, drama, or poemfromdetailsinthe text, includinghowcharactersinastory or dramarespondtochallengesor howthespeaker inapoemreflectsupona topic; summarizethetext. Priority Infer a theme based on key details in the text of a story, drama, or poem Analyze the relationship between a character in a story and drama, and his/her response to challenges Determine the author's point of view about a topic in a poem Create a summary of a story, drama, or poem

3. Compareandcontrasttwoor morecharacters, settings, or eventsina story or drama, drawingonspecific Supporting detailsinthetext(e.g., howcharactersinteract). Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story by providing specific details Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a drama by providing specific details Strand: Craft and Structure (CAS) Rating CSIPPart 4 Key Tasks Identify the skills to target for improvement Decide on instructional strategies Agree on what the plan will look like in classrooms

Put the plan in writing in the CSIP Three ways to improve student learning: simultaneously 1. Increase the level of knowledge and skills that the teacher brings to the instructional process 2. Increase the level and complexity of the content that students are asked to learn 3. Change the role of the student in the instructional process Decide on instructional strategies

Read books and articles on the strategies; but dont over think it!!! Avoid just increasing the quantity of academic tasks as an instructional strategy, instead ask: how does this strategy improve my practice? Avoid including multiple instructional stragies for each grade and school. CSIPPart 4 Key Tasks Identify the skills to target for improvement Decide on instructional strategies Agree on what the plan will look like in classrooms View videos that model the use of the instructional strategies; use the Teaching

Channel as a resource Put the plan in writing in the CSIP Protocol: Examine Model Instruction 1. Watch a video of instructional strategy a. What do you notice? Wonder? 2. Report and record noticings and wonderings 3. Discussion: a. What patterns do we see in the noticings? b. How did the model instruction add to our understanding of the instructional strategy? c. What is new about this instructional strategy? How is it similar to other instructional strategies we already use? 18

Protocol: Maitred Protocol 1) Find a partner (or triplet). 2) One instructional strategy will be called out. Discuss that strategy with your partner. How well does this strategy support teaching the skills on the CSIP? 3) Switch partners (or triplets) and repeat, until all strategies have been discussed. 1 9 Instructional Strategy Resources Marzano Research Click here to

access Teaching Channel Click here to access What Works Clearinghouse Click here to access EduCore: Tools for Teaching the Common Core Click here to access Common Core Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample

Performance Tasks Click here to access Engage New York Click here to access Reading strategies book by J. Serravallo Click here to Workshop Objectives Objective 2- Discuss the process to identify an assessment plan

to monitor the CSIP Level and Type of Learning How would you know the level and type of learning in your school without using test scores? No standardized tests No benchmark tests No unit tests How would you know? Levels of Demonstrating Learning: Blooms Taxonomy

Levels of Demonstrating Learning: Higher Order Thinking Skills Levels of Demonstrating Learning: Depth of Knowledge Tasks predict student performance Think of the task as the ceiling of what we would expect students to know from in class Tasks with low cognitive demands require low cognitive student responses

Tasks with high cognitive demands require high cognitive student responses Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level 12 11 10 Average Assignment Grade Level 9 8

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 4

5 6 Grade Level 7 8 9 1 0 1 1

1 2 Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level 1 2 1 1 1 0 9 11 10

Average Assignment Grade Level 9 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4

4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0 12 0 0

1 2 3 4 5 6 Grade Level Grade Level Standard 7

8 9 1 0 1 1 1 2 Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level 1 2

1 1 0 9 1 1 1 2 Average Assignment Grade Level 7.82 7 5.78

6 6.3 7 4.97 5 4.34 3.62 4 2.88 3 2

0 9.7 8 8.5 8 1 9.5 6 0.00 2 0

0.9 9 1 1.9 4 2 3 4 Grade Level Standard 5

6 7 8 Grade Level Average Assignment Grade Level 9 1 0 Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level 1

2 1 1 0 9 1 1 1 2 Average Assignment Grade Level 7.82 7

5.78 6 6.3 7 4.97 5 4.34 3.62 4 2.88 3

2 0 9.7 8 8.5 8 1 9.5 6 0.00 2

0 0.9 9 1 1.9 4 2 3 4 Grade Level Standard

5 6 7 8 Grade Level Average Assignment Grade Level 9 1 0 Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level

1 2 1 1 0 9 1 1 1 2 Average Assignment Grade Level 7.82

7 5.78 6 6.3 7 4.97 5 4.34 3.62 4 2.88

3 2 0 9.7 8 8.5 8 1 9.5 6 0.00

2 0 0.9 9 1 1.9 4 2 3 4 Grade Level Standard

5 6 7 8 Grade Level Average Assignment Grade Level 9 1 0 Grade Level Standard to Average Assignment Grade Level

1 2 1 1 0 9 1 1 1 2 Average Assignment Grade Level 7.82

7 5.78 6 6.3 7 4.97 5 4.34 3.62 4 2.88

3 2 0 9.7 8 8.5 8 1 9.5 6

0.00 2 0 0.9 9 1 1.9 4 2 3 4 Grade Level

Standard 5 6 7 8 Grade Level Average Assignment Grade Level 9 1 0 Questions to consider when analyzing

the task: 1.What is the actual work that students are being asked to do? 2.What do you have to know in order to engage the task? 3.What is the actual product of the task? 4.What is the distribution of performance among students in the class on the task? 5.If you were a student and did the task, Questions to consider when analyzing the task: 1. What is the actual work that students are being asked to do? 2. What do you have to know in order to engage the task?

3. What is the actual product of the task? 4. What is the distribution of performance among students in the class on the task? 5. If you were a student and did the task, what would you know and be able to do? Analyze the task: Grade 4 math What is the actual work that students are being asked to do? If you were a student and did the task, what would you know and be able to do?

Analyze the task: Grade 4 math What is the actual work that students are being asked to do? If you were a student and did the task, what would you know and be able to do? Plan to Assess Progress Assessment Type Short-term Examples student classwork, student homework, ACT Aspire Classroom Assessments, Quizlets (select items) Teacher Classroom Observations:

Peer to Peer and Principal Medium-term ACT Aspire Interim Assessments, Quizlets (select items), unit/chapter quizzes (formative), unit/chapter tests (summative) Long-term ACT Aspire summative test End-of-Course Assessment (teachers collaborate to create these assessments) Example Plan to Assess Progress What is the name of the assessment?

Teachergenerated formative assessments ACT Aspire Classroom Assessment #'s 5, 6, 7, and 8 Quizlets ACT Aspire Interim Assessments Assessment Type Short-term

Short-term Medium-term Medium-term Who is assessed? Grades K-8 Grade 3 Grades K-8 Grades 3-8 When is the

data collected? Results will be collected bi-weekly on Fridays through the end of the first trimester, Nov. 7 Classroom Assessment #5 on Sept. 15, #6 on Sept. 22, #7 on Oct. 6, and #8 on Oct. 13 Learning Goal

Who is responsible for collecting and keeping track of the data? At least 66% of students will be Paul Bambrickproficient in each Santoyo (grade 3 teacher) assessment. At least 66% of Paul Bambrickstudents will be Santoyo (grade 3 proficient in each teacher) assessment.

Results will be collected by the end of the first trimester, Nov. 7 At least 66% of Paul Bambrickstudents will be Santoyo (grade 3 proficient in each teacher) assessment. Results will be collected October 20, January 18,

and March 5 At least 66% of students will the Paul Bambrickminimum score that Santoyo (grade 3 places them onteacher) track to meet the benchmark Workshop Objectives Objective 3- Discuss the alignment between professional development and the CSIP Improving Practice Improves Student Learning

Questions to consider regarding professional development Is the professional development our school provide intensive, ongoing, and connected to practice? Does the professional development our school provide focuses on the teaching and learning of specific academic content? Is the professional development our school provide connected to other school initiatives? Does the professional development our school provide builds strong working Characteristics of Effective Professional Development 1. Professional development should be

intensive, ongoing, and connected practice 2. Professional development should focus on student learning and address the teaching of specific curriculum content 3. Professional development should align with school improvement priorities and goals 4. Professional development should build BREAK Objectives Objective 4- Identify key tasks in adjusting instruction as a result of the CSIP Objective 5- Define a process to adjust instruction in response to assessment results Objective 6- Distinguish between technical challenges and

adaptive challenges Key Task in Adjusting Instruction: What skills? Which skills on the CSIP have been taught and assessed? What is the evidence that shows students are learning the skills identified on the CSIP? Key Task in Adjusting Instruction: What evidence? Which skills on the CSIP have been taught and assessed? What is the evidence that shows students are learning the skills identified on the CSIP?

ACT Aspire Interim Monitoring ACT Aspire Interim Monitoring ACT Aspire Classroom Assessment(s) ACT Aspire Classroom Assessment(s) Key Task in Adjusting Instruction: What Evidence? 1. Teacher teams work collaboratively to collect and analyze short-term data and medium-term data to evaluate the impact of the action plan on student learning

Key Task in Adjusting Instruction: What Evidence? 2. Teacher teams compare short-term and medium-term assessment results to individuallevel and group-level student learning goals. Compare student results to the learning target. Key Task in Adjusting Instruction: What Evidence? 3. Questions to respond to when analyzing tasks for short-term assessments: First: What is the actual work that students are being asked to do? Second: What do you have to know in order to engage the task? Third: What is the tasks Depth of Knowledge level?

Fourth: What is the distribution of performance among students in the class on the task? Fifth: If you were a student and did the task, what would you know and be able to do? Levels of Complexity: Webbs Depth of Knowledge 4. Key Task in adjusting instruction: what evidence? Teacher teams implement and assess the instructional strategies described in the action plan. 5. Teacher teams use short-term and medium-term data to assess the impact of the action plan on student

learning. Answer the question: Are these instructional strategies delivering the desired results? 6. Teacher teams use data about implementation and student learning to make adjustments to instruction. Are these instructional strategies delivering the desired CSIP: Grade 3 reading results? Benchmark: 3.RL.IKI.9 Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters Strategy: Does the story have to be set there, and then? from

Reading Strategies (Seravallo, page 151). Think about the setting of the story. Consider if the settings is just background, or it it plays an important role in the story. One way to do this is to think, If the story were set someplace else, or at a different time, how would the story be any different? Then think, Based on the setting the author has chosen, what impact does the setting have on the story? Are these instructional strategies delivering the desired results? Adjusting the strategy on the CSIP Identify a new strategy(ies) to teach the benchmark skill Better lessons: theme lesson

Objective 1- Identify key tasks in adjusting instruction as a result of the CSIP. Objective 2- Define a process to adjust instruction in response to assessment results Objective 3- Distinguish between technical challenges and adaptive challenges Whole-group or Small-group instruction? The optimal percent of proficiency to determine adjusting to small-group instruction is 66%.

The optimal success rate for fostering student achievement is 80%. A success rate of 80% shows large groups of students are learning the material. Adjust from Whole-group Instruction to Differentiated Small-group Identify the skills on the CSIP that have a Instruction

proficiency rate of 66% or greater. Provide differentiated small-group instruction: those not proficient and those that are proficient Identify the skills on the CSIP that have a proficiency rate that is less than 66%. Wholegroup instruction continues until a proficiency rate that is equal to or greater than 66% is reached. Objective 1- Identify key tasks in adjusting instruction as a result of the CSIP Objective 2- Define a process to adjust instruction in response to assessment results Objective 3- Distinguish between technical challenges and adaptive challenges Technical and Adaptive

Challenges What is the difference between technical and adaptive challenges? Why is this important? Technical Challenges vs TechnicalAdaptive Challenges Adaptive Challenges Challenges Problems that can be solved through the Problems that require leadership knowledge of experts or senior authorities are those that the experts cannot Problems reside in the head; solving them solve requires an appeal to the mind, to logic,

The solutions lie not in technical and to the intellect answers, but rather in people The solutions are clear themselves Problem reside in the heart; to solve them, requires changes in peoples values, beliefs, habits, ways of working Schools face technical challenges Establish a mentoring program for beginner teachers Improve the technology infrastructure to enhance teaching and learning

Organize field trips and assemblies Schools face adaptive challenges Create, implement, and monitor an authentic school improvement plan Provide meaningful performance evaluation that improves teachers practice Provide students with high quality instruction that requires student collaboration and critical thinking Why is this important? The work of school leadership is not technical work. That is, the work is not made up of precise procedures done either correctly or incorrectly. The skills on the CSIP are the ones that challenge

students the most on the summative test. A technical solution: use the same instructional strategies and tasks from prior years. Adaptive solution: use new instructional strategies and tasks to target these skills. Complete the key tasks from Objective 1 of this webinar Have teachers collect and analyze results from short-term and medium-term assessments Identify the skills that show a proficiency rate at or above 66% Have teachers share how they will adjust instruction in response to assessment results Questions? Email: [email protected] @archchicago.org

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