Grade 11 stst Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions

Grade 11 stst Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions

Grade 11 stst Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Teacher Directions Reading 12 Selected-Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed-Response Writing 1 Full Composition (Performance Task) 1 Brief Write 1 Write to Revise Writing w/ Integrated Language 1 Language/Vocabulary 1 Edit/Clarify Sequential Steps Sequential Steps toward Standard toward Standard Mastery. Mastery. Performance Task Performance Task at Grade Level. at Grade Level. 11 stst Quarter Quarter Three Three PrePreReading: Literature Grade One Assessment Assessment Targets Standards DOK 3 Word Meanings RL.4 1-2 6 Text Structures/Features RL.7 2 5 Analysis Within and Across Texts RL.9 4 Reading: Informational Grade One Targets Standards

DOK 10 Word Meanings RI.4 1-2 11 Reasoning and Evidence RI.8 3-4 12 Analysis Within and Across Texts RI.9 2-3-4 Note: There may be more than one standard per target. Standards can have different DOKs per target. Actual assessed writing standards are boxed. Narrative Writing and Language Targets Standards DOK 1a Brief Narrative Write W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 3 1b Write-Revise Narrative W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 2 2 Full Narrative Composition W-3a, W-3b, W-3c, W-3d, W-4, W-5, W-8 4 8 Language-Vocabulary Use L.1.6 1-2 9 Edit and Clarify L.1.1.d 1-2

All elementary ELA assessments were reviewed and revised in June of 2015 by the following amazing and dedicated HSD K6th grade teachers. Deborah Alvarado Lincoln Street Ko Kagawa Minter Bridge Linda Benson West Union Jamie Lentz Mooberry Anne Berg Eastwood Sandra Maines Quatama Aliceson Brandt Eastwood Gina McLain TOSA Sharon Carlson Minter Bridge Teresa Portinga Patterson Deborah Deplanche Patterson Judy Ramer Consultant Alicia Glasscock Imlay Sara Retzlaff McKinney Sonja Grabel Patterson Jami Rider Free Orchards Megan Harding Orenco Kelly Rooke Free Orchards Renae Iversen TOSA Angela Walsh Witch Hazel Ginger Jay Witch Hazel Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 3 Performance Task: Optional! Background This is a pre-assessment to measure the task of writing an informational piece. Full compositions are always part of a Performance Task. A complete performance task would have: Part 1 A Classroom Activity (30 Minutes) Activity should include (group activity) vocabulary or language from either text that students are unfamiliar with. The activity may also

include an internet search or a read aloud about life cycles that are not directly pre-teaching any part of the assessment. (35 minutes Independent work) Passages or Stimuli to Read 3 Research Questions There may be other constructed response questions. Part 2 An Informational Composition (70 Minutes) Students should have access to spell-check resources but no grammar-check resources. Students can refer back to their passages, notes and 3 research questions and any other constructed responses, as often theyd like. Directions 30 minutes 1. You may wish to have a 30 minute classroom activity. The purpose of a PT activity is to insure that all students are familiar with the concepts of the topic and know and understand key terms (vocabulary) that are at the upper end of their grade level (words they would not normally know or are unfamiliar to their background or culture). The classroom activity does not pre-teach any of the content that will be assessed! 35 minutes 2. Students read the passages independently. If you have students who can not read the passages you may read them to those students but please make note of the accommodation. Remind students to take notes as they read. During an actual SBAC assessment students are allowed to keep their notes as a reference. 3. Students answer the 3 research questions or other constructed response questions. Students should also refer to their answers when writing their full opinion piece. 15 minute break 70 Minutes 4. Students write their full composition (informational piece). Scoring An Informational Rubric is provided. Students receive three scores: 4. Organization and Purpose 5. Evidence and Elaboration 6. Conventions Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 4 Describing Experiences Classroom Activity Give Before the Performance Task This classroom pre-activity follows the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium general design of contextual elements, resources, learning goals, key terms and purpose [http://oaksportal.org/resources/] The content within each of these was written by The Classroom Activity introduces students to the context of a performance task, so they are not disadvantaged in demonstrating the skills the task intends to assess. Contextual elements include: 1. an understanding of the setting or situation in which the task is placed 2. potentially unfamiliar concepts that are associated with the scenario 3. key terms or vocabulary students will need to understand in order to meaningfully engage with and complete the performance task The Classroom Activity is also intended to generate student interest in further exploration of the key idea(s). The Classroom Activity should be easy to implement with clear instructions. Please read through the entire Classroom Activity before beginning the activity with students to ensure any classroom preparation can be completed in advance. Throughout the activity, it is permissible to pause and ask students if they have any questions. Resources needed: Chart paper, white board or chalkboard, markers or chalk Some method of displaying ancillary materials* Colored copies of pictures Learning Goals: Students will understand the context of the key concepts related to the topic: o how characters respond to experiences o how characters describe their experiences Students will understand the key terms: Note: Definitions are provided here for the convenience of facilitators. Students are expected to understand these key terms in the context of the task, not memorize the definitions. experiences narrative feel

[Purpose: The facilitators goal is to . Help students understand how characters respond to and describe their experiences. *Facilitators can decide whether they want to display ancillary materials using an overhead projector or computer/Smartboard, or whether they want to produce them as a handout for students. Describing Experiences Classroom Activity Facilitator says: Today, we will get ready for the Narrative Writing Performance Task where you will be writing a make believe story. Remember, a narrative is a story that describes events that have happened. Facilitator says: Do you know what every story needs to have? Possible student responses: Beginning, middle, end Characters Setting Plot Problem Solution [Write down student responses on board. If students do not come up with reasonable or relevant responses, use the examples from the possible student answers above.] Facilitator says: Today, we are going to focus on characters. Im going to show you some pictures and we are going to look at the pictures to see how the characters might be feeling. [Show picture of dinosaur] Facilitator says: I have a picture of a dinosaur. I am looking at the dinosaur and the other objects in the picture. I notice that he is in bed. Next to him are tissues, flowers and a get well card. I think he might be sick. Sometimes when I get sick people send me cards. Facilitator says: You can usually tell how a character feels by the clues from the pictures and story. Now I am going to show you more picture and you will get a chance to figure out how you think characters are feeling. [Show students the picture of the Frog and Toad] Discussion question: What clues can you use from this picture to figure out how a character is feeling in a story? Turn to your partner and talk about this question. [Give students one minute to discuss with partners] Possible student responses: Theyre hungry They like cookies They are happy [Write down student responses on board. If students do not come up with reasonable or relevant responses, use the examples from the possible student answers above.] [Show students the picture of David ] Discussion question: What clues can you use from this picture to figure out how a character is feeling in a story? Turn to your partner and talk about this question. [Give students one minute to discuss with partners] Possible student responses: He is feeling silly He has a lot of energy He is feeling artistic [Write down student responses on board. If students do not come up with reasonable or relevant responses, use the examples from the possible student answers above.] [Show students the picture of The Lorax] Discussion question: What clues can you use from this picture to figure out how a character is feeling in a story? Turn to your partner and talk about this question. [Give students one minute to discuss with partners] Possible student responses: He is feeling sad He is wondering what happened He is upset [Write down student responses on board. If students do not come up with reasonable or relevant responses, use the examples from the possible student answers above.] Facilitator says: In your performance task, you will be learning more about describing characters and how they feel. The group work you did today should help prepare you for the research and writing you will be doing in the performance task. ancillary materials Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Order at HSD Print Shop http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintSho Order at HSD Print Shop p/WebSubmissionForms.aspx http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintSho p/WebSubmissionForms.aspx

Directions The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform instructional decision making. It is not the intent of these assessments to have students guess and check answers for the sake of finishing. All students should move toward taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies. If students are not reading at grade level and cant read the text, please read the stories to the students and ask the questions. Allow students to read the parts of the text that they can. Please note the level of differentiation a student needed. About this Assessment This assessment includes: Selected-Response (SR), Constructed-Response(CR), and a Performance Task (PT). Types of SBAC Constructed Response Rubrics in this Assessment http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=774846 Reading 2 Point Short Response 3 Point Extended Response Writing 4 Point Full Composition Rubric (Performance Task) 3 Point Brief Write (1-2 Paragraphs) Rubric 3 Point Write to Revise Rubrics as Needed Research 2 Point Rubrics Measuring Research Skill Use Quarter 3 Performance Task The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC. Please take 2 days to complete performance tasks. Part 1 Part 2 Classroom Activity if Desired/Needed Read two paired passages. Take notes while reading (note-taking). Answer SR and CR research questions about sources Components of Part 1 Note-Taking: Students take notes as they read passages to gather information about their sources. Students are allowed to use their notes to later write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be taught as structured lessons throughout the school year in grades K 6. A teachers note-taking form with directions and a note-taking form for your students to use for this assessment is provided, or you may use whatever formats youve had past success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking page in this document before the actual assessment if you choose to use it. Research: In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed response questions written to measure a students ability to use research skills needed to complete a performance task. These CR questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than reading response rubrics. Plan your essay (brainstorming/pre-writing). Write, Revise and Edit (W.5) Writing a Full Composition or Speech

Components of Part 2 Planning Students review notes and sources and plan their composition. Write, Revise and Edit Students draft/write, revise and edit their writing. Word processing tools should be available for spell check (but no grammar check). This protocol focuses on the key elements of writing narratives: 1. introduction (narrator and/or setting and characters) 2. organization (event sequence) 3. development (narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, description reflection, and multiple plot lines) 4. transitions (to sequence events) 5. conclusion 6. conventions of standard English. There are NO Technology-enhanced Items/Tasks (TE) Note: It is highly recommended that students have experiences with the following types of tasks from various on-line instructional practice sites, as they are not on the HSD Elementary Assessments: reordering text, selecting and changing text, selecting text, and selecting from drop-down menu Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Pre-Assessment and Learning Progressions The pre-assessments measure progress toward standard mastery. Unlike the Common Formative Assessments which measure standard mastery, the pre-assessments are more like a base-line picture of a students strengths and gaps, measuring skills and concepts, students need along the way, in order to achieve standard mastery. Beg. of QTR END of QTR Example of a Learning Progression for RL.2.1 Pre-Assessments Measure Adjustment Points (in purple) CFA After the pre-assessment is given, Learning Progressions provide informal formative assessment below and near grade-level tasks throughout each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall who, what, where, when, why and how about a story read and discussed in class. DOK - Kc Use and define Standard Academic Language: who, what, where, when, why, and how; ask, answer, questions, key details DOK 1 - Cd Connect the terms who to characters; where and when to setting; what

and how to sequence of events. DOK 1 - Cf Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why and how questions about key details in a text. Throughout the QTR DOK 2 - Ck DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Student understands that key details help tell who, what, where, when, why and how. Uses key details to identify who, what, where, when, why and how about a story not read in class. DOK 2 -Cl Finds information using key details to answer specific questions about a new story. RL.2.1 grade-level standard assessment. Standard Mastery RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text So what about a post-assessment? There is not a standardized post-assessment. The true measure of how students are doing along the way, is assessed in the classroom during instruction and classroom formative assessment. For this reason The CFAs are not called post-assessments. The CFAs measure the end goal, or standard mastery. However, without the pre-assessments, how will we know what our instruction should focus on throughout each quarter? Learning Progressions: are the predicted set of skills needed to be able to complete the required task demand of each standard. The learning progressions were aligned to Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix. The pre-assessments measure student proficiency indicated on the boxes in purple (adjustment points). These points are tasks that allow us to adjust instruction based on performance. For instance, if a student has difficulty on the first purple adjustment point (DOK-1, Cf) the teacher will need to go back to the tasks prior to DOK-1 Cf and scaffold instruction to close the gap, continually moving forward to the end of the learning progression. There is a Reading Learning Progression checklist for each standard in each grade that can be used to monitor progress. It is available at:

http://sresource.homestead.com/Grade-2.html Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 11 Quarter Three: Reading Literature Learning Progressions The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall specific feeling and sensory (the 5 senses) words in a story read and discussed in class. DOK 1 - Kc Understands and uses Standard Academic Language: words, phrases, story, poem, feelings, taste, L.1.5a Sort touch, smell, words into hear and feel categories (e.g., (in words and colors, clothing) phrases). to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent. DOK 1 - Ce Identifies appropriate feeling or sensory words or phrases to use when speaking and writing. DOK 1 - Cf Answers questions that require using feeling or sensory words or phrases about a story read and discussed in class. NOT ASSESSED DOK 1 - Ka DOK 1 - Kc Locate illustrations Define and use in a story. Standard Academic Language: Recall details illustrations, story, about characters, details, describe, setting or events. characters, setting and event. (read and

discussed in class) DOK 1 - Kc Understand and use Standard Academic Language: character, experience, compare, contrast, adventures and stories. DOK 2 - Cl Give examples and nonexamples of words and phrases that suggest L.1.5c Identify real-life feelings or connections between appeal to words and their use (e.g., senses in note places at home that stories or are cozy). poems DOK 2 - APm Use context of stories or poems to identify words or phrases that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. SELECTED RESPONSE SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 1 - Cf Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about literary elements (characters, Identify text details setting and words that help events). describe a character, setting or event. DOK 2 Ci Identify a Answers Summa character, a who, what, rize a setting and when, charact an event where or ers sequence in how advent a story questions ure in a

(general about story understandi specific read in ng). experiences class. of characters. DOK 1 - Cd DOK 2 - Ch Concept Understanding Understands that some words or phrases can tell how someone feels (emotional) and some explain how something looks, smells, feelstouch, tastes or sounds. DOK 1 - Cd Identify an illustration in a story that helps describe a character, setting or event. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 1 Ka Recall or locate characters in a story read and discussed in class. DOK 1 - APg Reads sensory or feeling words using the language structure or word relationships to determine word meaning at a first grade level (i.e., smell, smelled, smelling L.1.4c). DOK 1 Cf DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Explain how details and illustrations are used by an author to describe characters, setting or events. DOK 2 - Cl Locate illustrations and details that answer specific questions about

characters, setting or events. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 Ch Concept Developm ent Understan ds that stories tell about experienc es and adventure s of characters (and gives NOT examples) ASSESS . ED DOK 2 ANp Locate Lists on a informatio graph n about details characters about the adventure adventur s or es or experience experienc s in two es of 2 stories. character s. DOK 2 - Cl SELECTED RESPONSE Standard RL.1.4 Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. L.1.4a Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events.

Standard RL.1.7 Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE DOK 3 APx Distinguishe Determine s which similarities details in a and text show differences similarities between and characters differences adventures in in a new characters text. experiences or adventures. DOK 3 - Cu SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 3 - EVS Write a concluding sentence about the main differences and similarities of characters experiences or adventures. DOK 4 SYU Standard RL.1.9 Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories. CONSTRUCTE D RESPONSE Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 12 Quarter Three: Reading Informational Learning Progressions The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. Path to DOK - 2 Path to DOK - 1 End Coal DOK 1 - Ka Recalls the

meaning of specific words and phrases asked about a text read and discussed in class. DOK 1 - Kc DOK 1 - Ce DOK 1 Cf DOK 2 APg DOK 2 Ch Use and understand Standard Academic Language: ask, answer, question, determine, clarify, meaning, word, phrases and text. Select words or phrases connected to a text read and discussed in class when asked. L.1.6 Ask and answer who, what, when, why, and how questions about words and phrases in a text read and discussed in class. Use language structure (pre/suffixes) and word relationships to help determine the meaning of words. L.1.4b Uses frequently occurring root words (looks, looked) to help determine meaning. L.1.4c Concept Developme nt: Understand s that word and phrases have specific meaning in a text.

NOT ASSESSED SELECTED RESPONSE Path to DOK - 1 DOK 2 APm Use context to help ask or answer questions about the meaning of unknown words or phrases. L.1.4a SELECTED RESPONSE L.1.5d Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings. Standard RI.1.4 Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text. Path to DOK - 3 Path to DOK - 2 End Goal DOK 1 - Ka DOK 1 - Kc DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ch DOK 2 - Ci DOK 2 - Cl DOK 2 - ANs Retell specific points from a text read and discussed in class. Understands and uses Standard Academic Language: identify reasons, author, support, points and text.

Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about specific points in a text read and discussed in class. Concept Development : Understands that reasons are details that tell or explain WHY. Uses a summarizing sentence frame to explain the reasons of a specific point (i.e., The author said ___ because ___). SELECTED RESPONSE Matches teacherprovided reasons to specific points in a text (which reasons explain __?) SELECTED RESPONSE Locates relevant points (points that are important) in a new text about a topic. NOT ASSESSED Path to DOK - 1 Path to DOK - 2 DOK 3 EVC DOK 3 - Cu Standard Identifies the RI.1.8 Identify reasons an author reasons an author gives to support gives to support points in a new text points in an (will lead to main informational text. idea and key details in upper grades). CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Path to DOK - 3 End Goal DOK 1 - Ka DOK 1 - Kc Recall basics Understand facts from s and use two texts Standard read and Academic

discussed in Language: class. Similarities, differences, between illustrations, descriptions , procedures and topic. DOK 2 DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ck Ch Answers Concept Identifies questions Develop or explains requiring ment the student to Understa purpose of explain nds that an information two texts illustration, found in on the a illustrations same description , topic will or description have procedure s or similaritie (in procedures. s and general). difference NOT s. ASSESSED DOK 2 - Cl Practices locating information from two texts about the same topic (i.e., which text uses an illustration to show ____?). SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 2 - APn DOK 1 - ANo DOK 2 - ANt Lists information found in two texts illustrations, descriptions or procedures to obtain and show understanding of a topic (can categorize information on a graphic organizer).

Identify specific text features (titles, captions, etc...)within illustrations, descriptions or procedures in order to answer questions about a text. Identify basic similarities of two new texts on the same topic. Identify basic differences between two new texts on the same topic. SELECTED RESPONSE DOK 3 - ANy Standard Analyze RI.1.9 Identify similarities of basic similarities information in in and differences two new texts on between two the same topic texts on the same and differences topic (e.g., in between two illustrations, new texts on the descriptions, or same topic procedures). (graphics, paragraph prompt, speech, discussions, etc...) CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 13 R E- Grade 1 S E read SOMETHING NEW EXPLAIN MORE A AGAIN and AGAIN

R RELEVANT OR NOT? C CONCLUDE H HAVE EVIDENCE Write one new key idea you learned about the main topic. . students to look at a part of the Instruct 1 passage they liked or at one youve chosen for 1 Instruct students to look a part of the . (a paragraph themthey or section). passage liked or one youve chosen for them (a paragraph or section). Ask students Does this part of the paragraph sectionDoes tell you something new about the Ask or students this part of the paragraph main topic? (remind themnew of the mainthe topic). or section tell you something about This is a key idea them aboutof the main topic. main topic? (remind the main topic). This is a key idea about the main topic. Explain more key details about the new key idea you learned. You can use words and pictures to tell about it. Ask students to look for key details that more about Ask explain students to look

forthe keysomething details that new. explain more about the something new. key details give evidence to support a key (orgive idea). key idea details evidence to support a key idea (or idea). Example if the main topic is about dogs and ...if the main topic is about dogs Example and ... The dog likes to play, (is the key Idea), key details might TheThen dog some likes to play, (is the keybe: Idea), the dogkey likes to play fetch. Then some details might be: the the to play with the ball. dogdog likeslikes to play fetch. the dog likes to play with the ball. Remember students will Remember students will need to have a noteneed to have a notetaking form for each taking form for each passage. passage. 2 2 3 Differentiation: Differentiation: In grade one you can scaffold students by starting with writing key idea andstudents move toward writing key details. In grade onejust youa can scaffold by starting with Students whoidea would from enrichment

continue writing just a key andbenefit move toward writing keycan details. on with more sections or paragraphs. Students who would benefit from enrichment can continue on with more sections or paragraphs. Students who need more direct instruction teach each part inwho a mini lesson. can be taught Students need more These direct concepts instruction teach each partseparately: in a mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately: Main topic Key Main Ideas topic Key Key Details Ideas Key Details ELL Students may need each part taught using language frames transitional words. ELL (sentence) Students may needemphasizing each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words. 3 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 14 Grade 1 Optional Informational Note-Taking Form Name_____________________ Passage_________________ Write one new key idea you learned about the main topic. Explain more key details about the new key idea you learned. You can use words and pictures to tell about it. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 15

Determining Grade Level Text Grade level text is determined by using a combination of both the CCSS new quantitative ranges and qualitative measures. Example: If the grade equivalent for a text is 6.8 and has a lexile of 970, quantitative data shows that placement should be between grades 4 and 8. Common Core Band Flesch-Kincaid The Lexile Framework 2nd - 3rd 1.98 - 5.34 420 - 820 4th - 5rd 4.51 - 7.73 740 - 1010 6th 8th 6.51 - 10.34 925 - 1185 9th 10th 8.32 - 12.12 10.50 - 1335 11th - CCR 10.34 - 14.20 11.85 - 1385 Four qualitative measures can be looked at from the lower grade band of grade 4 to the higher grade band of grade 8 to determine a grade level readability. Rate your text from easiest to most difficult between bands. 4 Qualitative Factors Beginning of lower (band) grade End of lower (band) grade Beginning of higher (band) to mid End of higher (band) grade Purpose/Meaning Structure Language Clarity Language Overall Placement The combination of the quantitative ranges and qualitative measures for this particular text shows that grade 6 would be the best readability level for this To see more details about each of the qualitative measures please go to slide 6 of: text. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Not suited

to band A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there are right and wrong answers, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2 Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information. Question # 7 Prompt: What details in the illustration and text help the readers to know more about the setting in The Wind and The Sun? Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information about specific illustrations and text (need both) that give an indication of the story setting. The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate the connections between the story and the illustrations. The response prompt should show an integration of both the story and the illustration details selected that support the setting of the story. Details from the illustration that students could use in their response may include: (1) the setting is outside, (2) the boy is outside and (3) the sun and wind show it is outside. Details from the text that students could use in their response may include: (1) the wind and sun saw a boy walking which infers being outside, (2) the boy had on a coat which infers that it may have been a cold day to begin with, (3) the boy took off his coat which infers it was eventually a warm day, (4) it was a windy day when the wind blew and (5) it was a hot day when the sun shone. Student Language Response Examples 2 1 0 The student locates and selects information about the setting of the story and interprets/integrates that information to explain how the details and pictures help the readers understand more about the setting. The setting of this story is outside. The picture shows the boy is outside. The sun and the wind are always outside, so it has to be outside. The outside is first cold because the boy has a coat on in the story. Then it is hot because the sun shines. The boy takes his coat off to show it is hot. The student locates and selects some or minimal information about the setting of the story and interprets/integrates that information to explain how the details help the readers understand more about the setting but with little reference to details from the text or illustration. The setting is where the boy and sun and wind are. They are outside. The student does not give enough evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information. The setting is where something happens. Toward RL.1.7 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 17 A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RL.1.9: 3- Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #8 (prompt): What lesson can readers learn from The Wind and The Sun ? Explain why you think so. Directions for Scoring Notes: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence (conclusion or central idea) of the prompt would be a complete answer to the prompt along with an explanation about why the student chose the specific lesson the story could teach readers. Specific identifications (key details) that support the lesson the story could teach readers depends on the student response. The response must be logical and make sense, of the inferences in the story or be connected to the story details in some way. Student responses should include, however, comments that address one or some of the following: (1) arguing, (2) boasting, (3) daring or competing, (4) never thinking youre wiser or stronger than others or you could be proven wrong, (5) getting along is better, (6) is winning important or not, and (7) what the sun or wind might have

learned about being right or wrong. Any response is accurate if supported by logical details from the text. Full Support (other details) could include specific details alluding to the above such as: (1) the wind boasted, (2) the sun boasted, (3) the wind began the boasting, (4) both the sun and wind argued, (5) both tried to prove they were right, (6) the wind could not remove the boys coat because and (7) the sun removed the boys coat by. The student gives a proficient response by stating a specific statement of a lesson readers could learn from the story and supporting that statement with logic and textual evidence or details. 3 2 1 0 The lesson readers can learn is to not always think you are better than other people. The wind said he was strongest. Then the sun said he was. They argued a lot. They both tried to show who was the strongest. In the end the sun was the strongest. I think the sun won because the wind started the argument and it shows he wasnt the best. It is kind of like you should not brag. The student gives a partial response by stating a somewhat specific statement of a lesson readers could learn from the story and supporting that statement with partial logic and textual evidence or details. This story gives a good lesson to be nice to others. If the wind was nice this would not have started the fight. The student gives a minimal response by stating a vague lesson readers could learn from the story but with little or no supporting logic or details from the text. I learned a lesson to button my coat outside. It could be windy. The student provides no evidence of stating a lesson or providing logical details from the text or illustration. Wind can blow hard and the sun can be very hot. Toward RL.1.9 DOK 3 - EVS Write a concluding sentence about the main differences and similarities of characters experiences or adventures. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2 Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information. Question # 15 Prompt: Tell why the wind is important. Use examples from both articles. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response: gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information about the prompt. Sufficient evidence that students can find and select information about the prompt would include facts/details students write about from both passages about what makes wind important. Students should be encouraged to use their notes. 3-5 examples are sufficient (if they are from both passages). The response: gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate information about the prompt. Students interpret when they select facts as relevant evidence to support the prompt and integrate when they write about their evidence. Relevant evidence can include that the wind is Important for a reason. Reasons should be stated (i.e., wind pushes birds, wind makes mountains, wind helps seeds to grow, wind blows leaves off trees, wind cools us in the summer with a sea breeze, etc...). Student Language Response Example Student gives 3- 5 sufficient reasons as evidence explaining why the wind is important from both passages. 2 1 0 The wind is important for a lot of reasons. The wind helps the leaves blow off of trees. In the summer you can feel a soft sea breeze on the beach. That can help you feel not so hot. Did you know wind can help make energy too? The wind blows a windmills blades around and around and it helps make a motor go. Wind can even help a bird fly when it pushes it. Student gives 1- 2 limited reasons as evidence explaining why the wind is important (limited means few details).

The student does use examples from both passages. The wind blows a lot. It makes the beach cool and it makes mountains too. The student does not give enough relevant information to answer the prompt. Wind makes my hair blow. I dont like it. Toward RI.1.8 DOK-3 Cu Identify reasons an author gives to support points in an informational text. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 19 A Note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 3 evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion Question #16 Prompt: Tell facts you learned about the wind from both articles. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information (or such as fact from opinion) about the prompt. Relevant information from Article 1 could include: (1) air is all around, (2) when air moves it makes wind, (3) warm air goes up and meets cool air, (4) winds can be hard or soft and (5) a sea breeze is a soft wind. Relevant information from Article 2 could include: (1) wind make mountains, (2) wind moves plant seeds, (3) wind pushes birds and kites, (4) wind helps make energy and (5) any information about how wind moves windmills mentioned in Article 2. Student Language Response Example Student presents sufficient relevant facts learned about the wind from both articles (student does not need to mention each fact). 2 In the first story, I learned how wind is made. The sun shines down and makes the land warm. This makes the air warm too so it goes up. Warm air goes up. Then when it goes up it meets the sky where the cold air is. When warm and cold air meet it makes the wind! This is like the sea breeze wind. First the warm air goes up from the beach. Then it meets the cool sea air and makes a sea breeze. In the next story I learned that the wind blows rocks and dirt. When this happens it makes mountains. The mountains take many years to become mountains. Wind blows seeds to new places and then they grow. The wind can do lots of things! Student presents partial or minimal relevant facts learned about the wind from both articles. 1 Wind is really neat. I feel wind sometimes and it hurts my ear. Wind happens when cold and warm air meet. I think thats why when I feel wind sometimes its cold and sometimes its hot. Wind can push birds and kites around too. 0 Student presents no evidence to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information about the prompt. Wind blows at my school and makes me feel bad. Toward RI.1.9 DOK-3 ANy RI.1.9 Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 20 Note: Brief Writes should take no longer than 10 minutes. Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are

assessing comprehension. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Brief Write Constructed Response Answer Key Organization: Conclusion W.1.3.c Target: 1a In your concluding statement, use temporal words to signal event order. W.3 Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. Prompt #17: Read the story below. Write an ending for the story that solves the problem. The Sad Cow One day a cow went to drink water from a big tank. The wind was blowing, but the windmill blades did not turn around and around. The motor did not pump water into the big tank. The cow was sad. Write a Brief Text, W.3b Temporal Words Target 1a Teacher /Rubric Language Response Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and lengthy. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: The student response should provide a conclusion (1-2 sentences) that logically follow and support the preceding information about the Sad Cow transitioning from the beginning to the end using specific temporal words to signal event order as this is the central focus of this brief write. The student will show that they recognize event sequence from the beginning of the story to the ending by using temporal words to signal event order. These words may include but are not limited to: (1) then, (2) but, (3) finally, (4) next, (5) and so, and (6) now (etc..). The conclusion should make sense and support the preceding information about the Sad Cow. Student Language Response Examples for a Brief Write 2 The brief write transitions from a beginning to a conclusion using temporal transitioning words to signal an event order that follows logically from the preceding information. Then, a farmer came by and saw that the cow was sad. He looked at the big water tank. Oh no, it is empty. So the farmer fixed the windmill blades. Now the cow has water and is happy. 1 The brief write transitions from a beginning to a conclusion using at least one temporal transitioning word to signal an event order but vaguely or somewhat follows logically from the preceding information. A farmer saw the broken windmill and water. So the farmer fixed it. 0 The brief write does not show transitions from a beginning to a conclusion. The motor got fixed. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 21 W.1.3 Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. Narrative Full Composition Performance Task Score 4 Example score 4 Rubric Student Explanation Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Elaboration of Evidence Conventions Statement of

Purpose/Focus Language and Vocabulary Organization Beginning establishes engaging context for story line/events (e.g., asks a question; starts with action or feelings) Effectively presents and maintains focus (controlling idea) of story line Has a beginning, middle, and an ending with a sense of closure(e.g., a lesson learned next time; he never did that again) Variety of transitions used appropriately Chronology is logical Relevant, concrete details create vivid images or ideas Effective use of dialogue, sensory and concrete details, strong verbs to advance the action; or to show how characters motivation, development or growth, change in the text. Maintains consistent narrators voice Uses precise language and sentence variety (simple, compound, with phrases) May use figurative language (e.g., imagery) Edits with support from peers, adults, resources Has few or no errors in grammar, word usage, mechanics as appropriate to grade (e.g., uses conventional spelling for words with common patterns) The student establishes the story line and engages the reader when the rabbit asks a questions and expresses feelings about wanting to go outside. The student has a beginning, middle and an ending in sequential order that moves forward with transitional words. The student

elaborates on the topic of wind by using concrete details and some sensory words as well as dialogue to advance the action in the story. The students voice is knowledgeable about the information. The student knows uses precise vocabulary (windmill, blades, motor, blow, etc) and a variety of sentence structures. The student has few or no errors in grammar, word usage, or mechanics as appropriate to grade. The student is beginning to use some quotes for dialogue, but not scored in grade one. Performance Task: You are going to write a narrative story. This means it has a beginning, middle and an ending. This is a make believe story. In your story you will write about a character who is going to go on a long walk to learn more about the wind. You will use details to help you write your story from all of the passages you have read. Then, you will tell the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. Where is the setting? Who is the character? What happened along the way? What did the character see, hear and feel? What did the character learn about the wind on the walk? Exemplar Student Writing Sample: Conventions for grammar and mechanics are used appropriately throughout. Dialogue is in the beginning stages. Engages reader and establishes storyline JoJo was a rabbit sitting in his house hole with his mom. He wanted to go outside but his mom said It is too windy. Please, please, he said. I like the wind. OK said mom. We can go on a windy walk and you can learn about the wind. Transitional words move story in event order. Uses topic vocabulary from texts. So, Mom and JoJo went walking in the wind. JoJo said What is that feeling? that is wind on your face mom said. It is blowing air. See the leaves blow off the trees? Will I blow away, he said. Next, JoJos ears blew straight up in the wind! Then, JoJo saw something strange. Mom said it was windmill! The wind made it turn around and around. It made a motor go vroooom! That made a big noise and scared JoJo. What is that in the wind I see JoJo said? Those are flower seeds! The wind helps them by blowing them where they can grow! Has a clear and logical conclusion. Elaborates with concrete, sensory details and dialogue. Finally, It was time to go home. It was windy but it was fun. But JoJo missed his nice warm house hole in the ground. JoJo learned that wind is blowing air and it can make things work like windmills. It can blow seeds to make flowers. After JoJo and mom got home they took a long nap. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 22 ELP 1st Grade Band Standards Organized by Modality Receptive modalities*:

Ways in which students receive communications from others (e.g., listening, reading, viewing). Instruction Listening and assessment of receptive modalities & reading focus on students communication of their understanding of the meaning of communications from others. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing Standard An ELL can 9 - create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text in which students communicate to others (e.g., Speaking speaking, writing, and & drawing). Instruction and Writing assessment of productive modalities focus on students communication of their own understanding or interpretation. 10 - make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate speech and writing Productive modalities*: Ways 1 construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing 8 determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text 3 speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics 4 construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence 7 adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing 2 5 participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems By the end of an English language proficiency level, an ELL

in 1st Grade can . . . 1 2 3 4 5 express a express an express an express opinions express opinions about a construct preference or opinion about opinion about a about a variety of variety of texts & topics, gradefamiliar topic or texts & topics, & give introducing the topic & giving appropriate oral opinion about a a familiar familiar topic. topic. story, & give a a reason for the a reason for the opinion, & and written reason for the opinion. providing a sense of closure. claims and Productive support them opinion. Interactive modalities*: Collaborative W) and with reasoning use(S of& receptive productive and evidence. modalities as students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and This performance task isopinions based on writing. As an option if youd like to monitor growth for ELP as a second goal, teachers can choose to emotions, and exchange 6 analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing (Phillips, p. 3). 4 because it aligns with this specific performance task. assess ELP2008, standard Your students full composition can be analyzed to identify 4 English language proficiency levels. It is evident that students will be navigating through the modalities to get to the end product. However, it is important to keep in mind what the full opinion writing performance task is assessing and how deeply the student understands class content and language. The ELP growth goal is to provide the just-right scaffolds for students to demonstrate their understanding in order for them to move from one proficiency level to the next. Oregon ELP Standards Aligned with Performance Task, 2014; Arcema Tovar Narrative Writing Pre-Assessment Student and Class Scoring: Scoring Key: Total # Correct

1 = Emerging 0-4 2 = Developing 5 - 7 3 = Proficient 8 - 10 4 = Exemplary 11 - 12 School Year: Grade: Teachers Name: School: Student Name: Focus and Elaboration and Conventions Organization Evidence Score Score Student ELP Total Score Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 10 0 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0

16 0 17 0 18 0 19 0 20 0 21 0 22 0 23 0 24 0 25 0 26 0 27 0 28 0 29 0 30 0 31 0 32 0 33 0 34 0 35

0 Grades K - 2: Generic 4-Point Narrative Writing Rubric Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization Score Statement of Purpose/Focus CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: Kinder-W.K.3 1st-W.1.3.1-2 2nd-W.2.3.1-2 Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Organization CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: Kinder-W.K.3.2 1st-W.1.3.2-3 2nd-W.2.3.3-4 Elaboration of Evidence Language and Vocabulary CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes/Production and Distribution of Writing: Kinder-W.K.3.3 1st-W.1.1.4 & W.1.5.2 2nd-W.2.1.4 CCSS and Report Card Alignment Conventions & Vocab. Acquisition: Kinder-L.K.1b-f & L.K.6 1st-L.1.1b-j & L.1.6 2nd-L.2.1 & L.2.6 Conventions CCSS and Report Card Alignment Conventions: Kinder-L.K.1a, L.K.2a, & L.K.2d 1stL.1.1a, L.1.2 2nd-L.2.2 Beginning establishes engaging context for story line/events (e.g., asks a question; starts with action or feelings) Effectively presents Exemplary and maintains focus (E) (controlling idea) of story line Has a beginning, middle, and an ending with a sense of closure(e.g., a lesson learned next time; he never did that again) Variety of transitions used appropriately Chronology is logical Relevant, concrete details Maintains consistent create vivid images or ideas narrators voice Effective use of Uses precise language dialogue, sensory and

and sentence variety concrete details, strong (simple, compound, verbs to advance the action; with phrases) or to how characters May use figurative motivation, development, language (e.g., imagery) growth, or change Edits with support from peers, adults, resources Has few or no errors in grammar, word usage, mechanics as appropriate to grade (e.g., uses conventional spelling for words with common patterns) Uses a combination of drawings, dictation, and writing (K) Event/ series of events is supported with key elements (gr K-2) Has title (gr 1-2) Proficient and clear focus (gr K-2) Clear order of events; provides a reaction (K) Has beginning, middle, and end or problem solution (gr 1-2) Uses basic transitions (e.g., before, after, then, next, later) to show event order or chronology (gr 1-2) Details include nouns, Appropriate use of verbs, and adjectives words (singular-plural) May use dialogue, sensory and prepositional or concrete details for effect phrases (gr 1-2) Produces variety of Elaborates on actions, complete sentences reactions, motivations, orally (K) or in writing thoughts, or feelings orally Uses adult/peer or in writing feedback to revise Edits with support from peers, adults, or resources (gr 2) Minor errors do not interfere with readers understanding Beginning has some context (when, why, etc.) for story line/events Includes key elements (characters, problem or Developin main event) and attempts g to establish a central focus (NM) Has beginning, middle, and end, but some parts need

work or need more clarity (e.g., may have digressions or gaps in the story; sequence or connection of events is not clear) Transitions are lacking or cause confusion Some elaboration strategies are evident in drawings or writing, or added with support/questioning from peers or adults Uses some details or dialogue to elaborate on images or ideas (actions, thoughts, feelings) Vocabulary use has minor errors Dictates, writes, and expands simple complete sentences Uses adult/peer feedback torevise Edits with support from peers, adults, or resources (gr 2) Uses grade-appropriate basic mechanics and word use with some errors Beginning may have confusing context or no context for story line/events Lacks key elements of the story line/events (character(s), problem, Merging or main event) Attempts a beginning, middle, and end, but one or more parts are missing or generic (e.g., once upon a time; the end) Attempts to add details to drawings or writing are random, generic (e.g., good, nice, pretty), or may seem irrelevant to story line OR May identify literary elements (characters, setting, action) without any added description or details Generally uses basic, incorrect, or below grade level vocabulary when dictating (K) or writing Uses adult/peer feedback to revise Edits with support from peers or adults(gr 2) Grade-appropriate mechanics are not used or have frequent errors

4 3 (M) 2 1 (NY) 0 A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to [fill in with key language from the intended target]. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer/Points Key Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer/Points Key Question 1 Why would the boy sit under the shade tree? Toward RL.1.4, DOK-2 Ch A 1 Question 2 What does the sentence mean? Toward RL.1.4, DOK-2 APm A 1 Question 3 How are both the wind and sun the same? Toward RL.1.7 DOK-1 Cd C 1 Question 4 What two things did the boy do? Toward RL.1.7, DOK-1 Cf (must have both correct) A, B 1 Question 5 What do the wind and the sun say to each other? Toward RL.1.9 DOK2 Cl A 1 Question 6 Which details explain why the sun was able to take off the boys coat? Toward RL.1.9 DOK-3 Cu B 1 Question 7 Literature Text Constructed Response 2 Question 8 Literature Text Constructed Response 3 Question 9 What word means about the same as pushes? Toward RI.1.4 DOK-2 APg A

1 Question 10 Which phrase in the sentence tells you what a breeze is? Toward C 1 Question 11 Which sentence tells the most about the wind? Toward RI.1.8 DOK2 Ci C 1 Question 12 Why does the author tell readers about warm and cool air? Select the best reason? Toward RI.1.8 DOK-2 CL B 1 Question 13 Look at both articles about wind. Which paragraph would you read to learn about hard and soft winds? Toward RI.1.9 DOK-2 CL C 1 Question 14 Which paragraph can tell you about how mountains are made? Toward RI.1.9 DOK-1 ANo B 1 RI.1.4 DOK-2 APm Question 15 Informational Text Constructed Response 2 Question 16 Informational Text Constructed Response 2 Write and Revise Question 17 Brief Write W.1.3c 2 Question 18 Which sentence could be added to the end of the paragraph? W.1.3d C 1 Question 19 Which word or phrase helps the reader best understand the meaning of the word form in the sentence below? L.1.6 B 1 Question 20 Which word should go in the blank to finish the sentence? L.1.1d B 1

Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 26 Grade 11 stst Student Copy Pre-Assessment Quarter 3 Name____________________ Directions: Read each story. Then answer the questions about the story. Student Directions: Part 1 Your assignment: You will read three texts. 1. Read texts. 2. Take notes about the texts. 3. Answer the questions. Part 2 Your assignment: You are going to write a narrative story. This means it has a beginning, middle and an ending. This is a make believe story. In your story you will write about a character who is going to go on a long walk to learn more about the wind. You will use details to help you write your story from all of the passages you have read. Then, you will tell the following things in your story: 4. 5. 6. 7. Where is the setting? Who is the character? What happened along the way? What did the character see, hear and feel? What did the character learn about the wind on the walk? 8. Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 9. Write Revise and Edit your first draft. 10. Write a final draft about the character who is going on a long walk to learn more about the wind. How You Will be Scored Purpose Did you tell what happened? Did you tell about a character and setting? Organization Did you tell what happened from beginning to end? Elaboration: of evidence Did you use details from all of the passages? Elaboration: of language and vocabulary Conventions Did you use describing words to show what the character saw, heard and felt? Did you follow rules for capitals, punctuation and spelling? Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 28 Grade Equivalent: 1.7 Lexile: 620 Mean Sentence Length: 11.47 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.93

Word Count: 218 The Wind and The Sun an Aesop Fable One day the wind said to the sun, I am stronger than you! The sun said, No, I am the strongest! The wind and sun argued back and forth most of the day. The next day they started to argue again. Then the wind and the sun looked down and saw a boy walking down the street. The boy had on a long, heavy coat. First, the wind said, I can take off the boys coat! But quickly afterwards, the sun said, I can take off the boys coat! Again they argued and argued about who was the strongest of the two. Will the sun win? Will the wind win? Who can take off the boys coat first? Then, the wind blew strong air, so strong that the boy could hardly walk. The harder the wind blew, the tighter the boy held unto his coat on. The wind blew until he was tired, but he still could not take off the boys coat. Now it was the suns turn. He sent his light upon the boy. The sun did not have to do much. He shone upon the boys head and back, until the boy became so warm, that he took off his coat and sat under a shade tree. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 29 1. Why would the boy sit under the shade tree? A. to cool down B. He liked trees. C. He was tired. Toward RL.1.4 DOK 2 Ch L.1.5c Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are cozy). 2. Read the sentence. The sun sent his light upon the boy. What does the sentence mean? A. The light shines on the boy. B. The sun sat on the boy. C. The sun had light. Toward RL.1.4 DOK 2 APm Use context of stories or poems to identify words or phrases that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. 30 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 3. How are both the wind and sun the same? A. Both made the boy take off his coat. B. Both could blow wind at the boy. C. Each believed he was the strongest. Toward RL.1.7 DOK 1 - Cd Identify text details words that help describe a character, setting or event. 4. What two things did the boy do? Choose 2 answers. A. The boy held his coat on tight when the wind blew. B. The boy took off his coat when the sun sent light on him. C. The boy did not take off his coat. Toward RL.1.7 DOK 1 - Cf Answer who, what, when, where and how questions about literary elements (characters, setting and events). 31 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 5. What do the wind and the sun say to each other? A. "I can take off the boys coat.

B. I can make the boy walk. C. I can make the boy warm. Toward RL.9 DOK 2 - Cl Locate information about characters adventures or experiences in two stories note: only 1 text is used thus students locate information about two characters. 6. Which details explain why the sun was able to take off the boys coat? A. I can take off the boys coat. B. He sent his light upon the boy. C. I am the strongest. Toward RL.9 DOK 3 - Cu Distinguishes which details in a text show similarities and differences in characters experiences or adventures. 32 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 7. What details in the illustration and text help the readers to know more about the setting in The Wind and The Sun? Toward RL.1.7 DOK 2 - APn Obtain and interpret information using illustrations and details to describe characters, setting, or events. 8. What lesson can readers learn from The Wind and The Sun? Explain why you think so. Toward RL.1.9 DOK 3 - EVS Write a concluding sentence about the main differences and similarities of characters experiences or adventures. 33 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Wind By Elizabeth Yeo Article 1 Grade Equivalent: 1.2 Lexile: 670 Mean Sentence Length: 11.13 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.24 Word Count: 167 1 Air is All Around You Did you know that air is all around you? When air moves it makes wind and you can feel wind on your face. You can see wind blow leaves off a tree. 2 What Makes the Wind? Do you know what makes the wind or have you ever wondered what makes the wind? First, the sun heats the land and then the warm land air goes up to the sky and clouds. There is cool air in the sky. When the cool air meets the warm air it makes the wind.

1. 2. 3. 4. Sun warms the land. Land warms the air. Warm air rises. Cool air moves down to meet the warm air. 3 What Makes a Sea Breeze? Do you like hard winds or soft winds? Some winds blow very hard but some winds blow softly. Soft blowing wind is called a breeze. If you feel a soft wind in the summer at the beach, it is a sea breeze. Warm beach air rises up to the sky. The air above the sea is cool. When the cool sea air meets the warm beach air it makes a sea breeze wind. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 34 What Can Wind Do? Grade Equivalent: 1.7 Lexile: 580 Mean Sentence Length: 8.33 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.43 Word Count: 125 By Elizabeth Yeo Article #2 Did you know that wind is very important? What can wind do? 1 Wind Makes Mountains When wind blows and blows it picks up rocks and dirt and moves them to another place. This makes mountains. It takes many years for mountains to form. 2 Wind Helps Plants Wind helps plants. It can make new plants by blowing their seeds to new places. 3 Wind Pushes Birds Birds know where to fly because the wind pushes them in a certain direction. Wind can help push airplanes and kites too. 4 Wind Makes Energy Windmills need wind to help make energy. First the wind blows. The wind moves the windmills blades. Then the blades turn around and around. When this happens it starts a motor. The motor helps make energy. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 35 9. Read the sentence. The wind pushes the birds in the right direction. Which word means about the same as pushes? A. moves B. stops C. starts

Toward RI.1.4 DOK 2 APg Use language structure (pre/suffixes) and word relationships to help determine the meaning of words. L.1.4b Uses frequently occurring root words (looks, looked) to help determine meaning. L.1.4c 10. Read the sentence: Soft blowing wind is called a breeze. Which phrase in the sentence tells you what a breeze is? A. blowing wind B. hard wind C. soft wind Toward RI.1.4 DOK 2 APm Use context to help ask or answer questions about the meaning of unknown words or phrases. L.1.4a Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 36 11. Which sentence tells the most about the wind? A. Some winds blow hard. B. Some winds are soft. C. Wind can do many things. Toward RI.1.8 DOK 2 - Ci Uses a summarizing sentence frame to explain the reasons of a specific point. 12. Why does the author tell readers about warm and cool air? Select the best reason. A. To help the reader know how warm air feels. B. To help the reader understand what makes the wind. C. To help the reader understand about cool air. Toward RI.1.8 DOK 2 - Cl Matches teacher-provided reasons to specific points in a text (which reasons explain __?) Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 37 13. Look at both articles about wind. Which paragraph would you read to learn about hard and soft winds? A.Air is All Around You B.Wind Makes Energy C.What Makes a Sea Breeze? Toward RI.1.9 DOK 2 - Cl Practices locating information from two texts about the same topic (i.e., which text uses an illustration to show ____?). 14. Which paragraph can tell you about how mountains are

made? A. What Makes the Wind? B. Wind Makes Mountains C. Wind Makes Energy Toward RI.1.9 DOK 1 - ANo Identify specific text features (titles, captions, etc...)within illustrations, descriptions or procedures in order to answer questions about a text. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 38 15. Write about why the wind is important. Use examples from both articles. RI.1.8, Research Target 2 Toward RI.1.8 DOK 3 - Cu Identifies the reasons an author gives to support points in a new text (will lead to main idea and key details in upper grades). 16. Write about facts you learned about the wind from both articles. RI.1.9 Research Target 3 Toward RI.1.9 DOK 3 - ANy Analyze similarities of information in two new texts on the same topic and differences between two new texts on the same topic (graphics, paragraph prompt, speech, discussions, etc...) Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 39 17. Read the story below. Write an ending for the story that solves the problem. The Sad Cow One day a cow went to drink water from a big tank. The wind was blowing, but the windmill blades did not turn around and around. The motor did not pump water into the big tank. The cow was sad. Write a Brief Text, W.3c Temporal Words Target 1a Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 40 18. Read the paragraph a student wrote about the wind. Revising a text W.3d elaboration Target 1b The wind blows and blows. It blows dirt to make a mountain. It blows seeds to help new plants grow. It blows windmills to make energy. Which sentence could be added to the end of the paragraph? A. Many plants were started by seeds the wind blew. B. I like how the wind blows. C. The wind can do many things. Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 41 19. Which word or phrase helps the reader best understand the meaning of the word form in the sentence below? It takes many years for mountains to form. Language and Vocabulary L.1.6 Lang. Use Target 8 A. start

B. be made C. begin 20. Read the sentence below. Edit and Clarify L.1.1d Indefinite Pronouns Target 9 The boy saw _____ of the leaves blow off the tree. Which word should go in the blank to finish the sentence? A. many B. some C. any Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 42 Student Directions: Part 2 Your assignment: You are going to write a narrative story. This means it has a beginning, middle and an ending. This is a make believe story. In your story you will write about a character who is going to go on a long walk to learn more about the wind. You will use details to help you write your story from all of the texts you have read. Then, you will write about the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. Where is the setting? Who is the character? What happened along the way? What did the character see, hear and feel? What did the character learn about the wind on the walk? 5. Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 6. Write Revise and Edit your first draft. 7. Write a final draft about the character who is going on a long walk to learn more about the wind. How you will be scored Purpose Did you tell what happened? Did you tell about a character and setting? Organization Did you tell what happened from beginning to end? Elaboration: of evidence Did you use details from all of the passages? Elaboration: of language and vocabulary Conventions Did you use describing words to show what the character saw, heard and felt? Did you follow rules for capitals, punctuation and spelling? Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 43 Performance Task Name: ___________________________________ ____________________ (title) Who is the character? Where is the setting? What happened at first? What happened along the way? What did the character see, hear and feel?

What did the character learn? How did the story end? Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 44 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions! Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 45 Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was not correct . Literary Text 1 I can recognize words used at school and home. RL.1.4 2 I can use the sentence to help me figure out what a word or phrase means. RL.1.4 3 I can use and find words that describe a character, setting or event. RL.1.7 4 I can answer who, what, when, where and how questions about characters, setting and events. RL.1.7 5 I can tell about characters adventures or experiences from two different stories. RL.1.9 6 I can find details to tell what is the same and different about characters experiences or adventures. RL.1.9 7 I can find and use illustrations and the text to describe characters, setting, or events. RL.1.7 8 I can write to tell what is the same and different about characters experiences or adventures. RL.1.9 3 2 1 0 2 1 0 Informational Text 9 I can use root words to know what a word means or how it should be used. RI.1.4 10 I can find clues to help me figure out what words mean. RI.1.4

11 I can summarize (with reasons) why an author tells about something. RI.1.8 12 I can match the reasons to specific points about something. RI.1.8 13 I can find information in two texts about the same topic. RI.1.9 14 I can find information in titles, captions and other informational text features. RI.1.9 15 I can find the reasons an author gives to support specific points about something. RI.1.8 2 1 0 16 I can find information about the same topic from two texts and explain how the information is the same and different. RI.1.9 2 1 0 Writing 2 17 W. W.1.3c (Brief Write) 18 Which sentence could be added to the end of the paragraph? W.1.3d 19 Which word or phrase helps the reader best understand the meaning of the word form in the sentence below? L.1.6 20 Which word should go in the blank to finish the sentence? L.1.1d 1 Rev. Control: 07/01/2015 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 0 46

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