Market Segment Strategies - Ultra Electronics

Market Segment Strategies - Ultra Electronics

Analyst Briefing 2015 24th June 2015 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 2 Ultras Market Facing Segments Mark Anderson 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data What have we done? Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 3 We have: Segmented our capability portfolio to better reflect the markets that we address, consistent with being an outward facing organisation Re-organised the business reporting lines consistent with the market facing segment authority, accountability and responsibility remain aligned in autonomous businesses Why now? Evolution right time now Complexity - >30% inter-divisional sales Coherency many businesses overlap Minimal cost of implementation 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 4 The 8 market segments

Lead 2014 revenue Aerospace Infrastruct ure Nuclear Rob McDonald 16.4% Chris Binsley 8.2% Chris Binsley 5.7% Comms C2ISR Brian Bates Brian Bates 15.3% 22.6% Underwat er warfare

Maritime Land Rusty Kollmorge n 19.6% Rusty Kollmorge n 9.6% Mike Clayton 2.6% Cyber Aerospace & Infrastructure Graeme Stacey Communications and Security Mike Baptist Maritime & Land Bill Terry 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 5 The reporting change Before Aircraft & Vehicle Systems Revenue

140.3m Profit 24.6m Order book 160.2m Operating margin 17.5% Information & Power Systems Revenue 204.0m Profit 29.2m Order book 175.9m Operating margin 14.3% Tactical & Sonar Systems Revenue 369.4m After Aerospace & Infrastructure % of Group revenue

before Information & Power Tactical & Sonar Revenue 198.6m Profit 29.6m Order book 253.0m Operating margin 14.9% Communications & Security Revenue 224.4m Aircraft & Vehicle % of Group revenue after Maritime & Land Profit 37.0m Order book

214.5m Aerospace & Operating Infrastructure margin 16.5% Maritime & Land Revenue 290.7m Profit 64.3m Profit 51.5m Order book 451.2m Order book 319.8m Operating margin 17.4% Communications Operating margin & Security 17.7%

2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 6 Market segment operating principles 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Internal benefits Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 7 Market segment strategies aligned with business operations reduces inter-division revenue to <10% of total Collaboration to rationalise the segments portfolio of capability Grow market share with affordable, scalable, modular, reliable systems more comprehensive offerings Select and grow new market capabilities in growth sectors through acquisition and development consideration at a segment rather than individual business level Improved market analysis better, shared understanding Improved customer recognition of the wide portfolio of capabilities available from Ultra improved brand awareness Improved internal processes talent recognition & development deployment of specialist resources 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data External benefits Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 8 Customer-focused market segment strategies replace Divisional strategies

Presents a joined-up Ultra to our customers allows Ultra to offer more competitive and broader offerings Clearer external presentation easier to compare to market parameters new divisional financial data from H1 2015 revenues by market segment from FY2014 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Introducing 3 of our segments Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 9 Underwater warfare Rusty Kollmorgen C2ISR Brian Bates Infrastructure Chris Binsley 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 10 Market Segment Strategies Underwater Warfare Rusty Kollmorgen 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Underwater Warfare Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 11 Actionable intelligence provided to independent or

networked platforms (aircraft, ship, submarine) through sensor detection of energy anomalies in the water (data) software processing and fusing of the data (information) presentation of information through specific human-machine displays (knowledge) Core capabilities acoustic expertise the physics of sound propagation in water mechanical properties of sound producing materials hydrodynamics of sensors on moving and deep hull forms packaging of sensitive sensor suites in demanding environments real-time digital processing manufacturing processes for throughputs of tens of thousands of units human factors as it applies to optimised display of information 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Underwater Warfare Market segment characteristics Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 12 Market growing at a projected 6.2% CAGR (segment is 19.6% of Ultra revenue) Customer requirements cost effective modular architecture that allow scalable functionality for tailored solutions human machine interfaces that minimise unique training SSTD a case study in collaboration and market approach (2002-2014) Surface Ship Torpedo Defence (S2170) grows and wins multiple international awards three Ultra businesses collaborate to capture Australias AWD ISS incumbent unseated on S2050

Positioning & growth established offerings enhance Pwin for India Navy pursuits investing in thinner, single tow solutions accelerating leadership in multi-static processing 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 13 Market Segment Strategies C2ISR Brian Bates 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data C2ISR Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 14 Enabling security and mission effectiveness through solutions that turn data into actionable information connecting different sensors and systems (collect) processing and fusing data (process) presenting timely information though specialist visualisation systems (disseminate) Core capabilities command and control surveillance and security communications surveillance covert reconnaissance airborne surveillance electronic warfare identity security forensic analysis 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data C2ISR

Market segment characteristics Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 15 Market large, diverse and competitive market that is forecast to grow at around 4.5% CAGR C2ISR segment represented 22.6% of Ultras 2014 revenue Customer requirements rise in asymmetric warfare and the need for advanced sensors and networked capabilities growing requirement for integrated solutions and interoperability increasing need for connectivity to aid situational awareness Positioning & growth acquisition of Herley Industries investing in integrated surveillance systems for Middle East, Far East and South America law enforcement market channels being used to cross market legal intercept 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 16 Market Segment Strategies Infrastructure Chris Binsley 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Infrastructure Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 17 Integrated infrastructure solutions through secure operational software, control systems and power management

domain expertise spanning airport & airline operational performance systems, rail transit power and energy sectors (efficiency & resilience) Core capabilities integrated information management systems power management & energy storage secure localised network communications for measurement and control protection of critical energy & transport information systems energy management & control smart infrastructure 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Infrastructure Market segment characteristics Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 18 Market overall growth forecast 6.5% CAGR (airports 4.5%, rail 3.9%) infrastructure segment 8.2% of Ultra revenue Customer requirements increasingly driven by global commoditised infrastructure programmes focus on value-add in smart, resilient infrastructure which

plays to core strengths prudent approach to growth whilst realigning into market segments Positioning & growth targeting of longer term strategic opportunities within energy networks and transportation hubs underpinned by refreshed shorter term offerings in packaged airport systems, export rail and stand-alone smart grid 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 19 Standardisation and Shared Services Mary Waldner and Graeme Stacey 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 20 S3 - Evolution not step change S3 We have been steadily developing and evolving the structure of the Group as we have increased the scope, diversity and complexity of our portfolio of capabilities Highly autonomous businesses

Collaborative Autonomy LAUNCH Segment behaviours Demanding tier 2 activities Centres of excellence More comprehensive offerings Divisional & segment structures Market segments LEAP Predominently tier 3/4 Singular markets Individual businesses Increased diversity

Divisional management Strongly acquisitive with high levels of internal investment Aligned authority, responsibility & accountability Strong financial accountability 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 21 What is S3? A Group-wide initiative to standardise non-differentiating processes and systems Standardisation will allow businesses to share resources in the following back-office functions Finance Commercial Procurement Legal risk management Human Resources Facilities and Information & Communications Technologies S3 will deliver a scaleable, sustainable operating model to support the future growth of the Group 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 22 S3 Impact on culture Business Autonomy Retained S3 Scope Competitive business

strategies Property strategy & site rationalisation Financial insight & accountability for business performance Financial transaction processing Engineering & technology design & specification High value procurement sourcing Talent selection, engagement & development Transactional HR processing Negotiation of commercial contract terms Legal risk management Management of information security risk ICT service delivery 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 23 S3 Indicative timescale 2015

2016 2017 2018 Strategy & business case Procurement & facilities Organisation & systems requirements Transition lead businesses Systems build, test & integration Lead business systems implementation Transition of the Group to shared services 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 24 Investment case Estimated project costs of 30m over three years ERP systems programme management restructuring cost of site closures Initial one off non-underlying cost of 5m (2m cash) in 2015 to cover programme set up Project self-funds during 2016 as efficiency savings cover project costs Estimated enduring efficiency savings of 20m will be deployed to: fund programme from 2016 - 2018 increase investment in R&D increase competitiveness improve profits

2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 25 Programme benefits Improved controls through standardisation and governance Working capital optimisation Standard and timely data to support decision making Businesses freed up to focus on value-add Enables retention of talent through extended career paths and global mobility Scaleability increased synergies from future acquisitions 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 26 EPD Acquisition Rakesh Sharma 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data NON-RELIANCE PROVISION PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence The Recipient understands and agrees that neither Fairmont Consulting Group LLC or any of their respective Representatives: (a) have made or make any representation or warranty hereunder, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the following analysis, OR (b) shall have any liability hereunder to the Recipient or

its Representatives relating to or resulting from the use of the analysis or any errors therein or omissions therefrom. May 2015 27 COMPANY OVERVIEW PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence Defense Primes Generate Over Half Of EPD Revenues EPD Revenues By Major Customer 2012A-2014A; $ Millions $140 $123.0 $120 $118.0 $116.8 Northrop Grumman accounts for over 25% of the three years of revenues and has experienced a slight decline since 2012 Revenues primarily driven by EA-18 Growler platform deliveries $100

Lockheed Martin sales accounts for 13% of revenues $60 Raytheon accounts for 5% of revenues $40 Boeing and DLA Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) each generate an additional 3% No single Other customer represents more than 2% of total revenues $80 $20 $0 2012A 2013A 2014A June 2015 28

COMPANY OVERVIEW PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence Win/Loss Record Shows Great Success Retaining Work; Varying Messages Regarding Pursuit Of New Business EPD pursued a total of $304M in business over the 2012-2014 period; the company won $234M of that value, and lost $70M $350 $300 $250 $200 Among business classified as new (not recompete) EPD won $76M out of $140M in total bids (54% win rate) Within that $76M in new business wins, $64M came from CTI/EWST, $10M from Lancaster, and $2M from New England Among business classified as recompete, EPD won $158M out of $164M in total bids (96% win rate) EPD: TOTAL COMPANY-WIDE WIN-LOSS PERFORMANCE $303M 70.05 $140 $50 $0 104.22 $164 $76M 12-14 Unit

$160 5.76 12-14 Rec-New 33.34 $40 EPD: RECOMPETES ONLY $158M 12-14 Win-Loss $158M $140 $66 $120 $100 75.51 $64 42.16 $0 $20 $1 12-14 Win-Unit 12-14 Prime-Sub CTI pursued $102M in new business and won 63% 2. Lancaster pursued $35M and won $10M (29%); $9M of this value was won as a subcontractor

3. New England pursued only $2M, and won $1.6M $91 12-14 Win-Loss 12-14 Win-Unit 1. $60 $40 12-14 Win-Loss The win/loss data for EPD allows the following observations 1. The company is VERY successful at retaining existing business, with a 96% recompete win rate on a value basis 2. The companys success in pursuit of new business varies widely by business unit 153.2 158.28 $76M $2 $10 $60 $20 $164M $0

64.29 $80 233.78 $180 $80 $120 $100 $150 131.41 EPD: NEW BUSINESS ONLY $140M $140 68.21 $100 $160 5.1 12-14 Prime-Sub June 2015 29 MARKET POSITIONING PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence

Electronic Warfare Is Segmented Into Three Distinct Missions; Mission Lines Are Blurring Electronic Warfare (EW) is a broad term, pertaining to any military action involving the use of the electromagnetic (EM) or directed energy to control the EM spectrum or to attack/disrupt the enemys use of the spectrum However, EW is not a monolithic mission set capabilities and programs broadly align with three Electronic Electronic Surveillance Electronic Protection distinct areasAttack (EA) Mission: Degrade, neutralize, or destroy enemy combat capability through EM, directed energy, or anti-radiation weapons Example Missions And Programs: Jamming and EM deception are examples of preventing or reducing an enemy's effective use of EM spectrum Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) Lasers, radio frequency weapons, particle beams are

examples of weapons that use either EM or directed energy as their primary destructive mechanism (ES)sensing for Mission: Tactical real-time response including: intercept, identify, and locate sources of intentional and unintentional radiated EM leading to threat avoidance, targeting, homing, and intelligence collection Example Missions And Programs: SEWIP Block II antennas and receivers F-16 Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR) fire control radar (EP)EM systems Mission: Protect against interference sourced from both friendly and enemy EW activities Example Missions And Programs:

ALQ-165 airborne self protect jammer (ASPJ) multiple platforms including the F-18 B-52 self protect jammer Havequick frequency-hopping system Advanced Test High ENergy Asset (ATHENA) Technology advancements and integration of systems have led to the blurring of EW missions May 2015 30 MARKET POSITIONING DoD Emphasis On Electronic Warfare Has Continued To Grow And Is Expected To Continue To Be An Area Of Focus PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence DoD Electronic Warfare Unclassified Procurement Budget 2014A-2020P; $ Billions $10 4.0% CAGR FY15-FY20 $9 $8.6 $7.8

$8 $6.9 $7 $7.9 $8.1 $8.5 $7.0 FY2014A; $1.6 MarketsandMarkets estimates the worldwide EW budget will grow from $17.7B in 2014 to $24.3B in 2020 (5.4% CAGR), driven by stealth aircraft and ships The EW budget contained in this study was created by reviewing unclassified budget line items currently of interest to EPD as well as similar programs where EPD components and integrated assemblies could be used $5 $4 P-8A Poseidon increased due 14 full rate production aircraft and CFE equipment

reassigned to GFE procurement $3 $2 $1 $0 FY2014A FY2015E FY2016R FY2017P FY2018P FY2019P May 2015 Fairmont estimates total DoD unclassified EW budget, Procurement and RDT&E, will grow at a 4.7% CAGR FY15-FY20 Electronic Protection $6 DoD unclassified EW budget is expected to grow from $7.0B in FY15 to $8.4B in FY20 representing a 4.0% CAGR FY2020P EW will continue to be a portion of new platforms

across the services and as technology advances, the 31 MARKET POSITIONING PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence DoD Has Increased Focus On Entire Electromagnetic Spectrum and Regaining EW Competitive Edge EW developments today involve the successful management of the electromagnetic spectrum in order to control all aspects of the battlefield either with a single system or a system of systems BBP 3.0 focuses on breaking down barriers to entry for commercial firms and increasing technology integration in order to maintain the EW technological superiority the U.S. had entering the Cold War The Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Frank Kendall, plans to collaborate with industry to receive concept definition input prior to issuing finalized requirements Electromagnetic Spectrum and Uses Source: Association of Old Crows Increasing R&D spending in key areas of technology while leveraging industry IR&D, commercial focus will leverage investments similar to system-on-chip technology which has made wideband digital elemental AESAs feasible BBP conversations have focused on taking a step back and rethinking the concept of programs like F-35, tightly integrated The DoD

procurement hopes to leverage lessons complex capabilitiesprocess crammed into one single military platform, which cost billions of dollars to upgrade and limit the ability to learned from past programs and products modernize subsystems at the same pace technology advances Modular designs with common architectures will be required to achieve advanced military applications and shorter implementation cycles Future EW capabilities will focus on collaborative work between platforms, leveraging manned and unmanned technology together to control the battlefield; specific capabilities under development include: Unmanned aircraft EW and ISR capabilities to provide manned system alternatives Modular systems, common interfaces, and software driven platforms (i.e. Angry Kitten) Interoperability with technology spanning the electromagnetic spectrum (i.e. DARPAs Arrays at Commercial Time-scales (ACT)) Battle field management and increased system correlation (i.e. System of Systems Integration Technology and Experimentation (SoSITE)

Cyber attack/protection (i.e. CHAMP ability to shut down rooms full of computers using an electromagnetic pulse) future programstechnology will have an increased focus on commercial technology, modular DoD systems, common interfaces, software driven reprogrammable systems which support an EW ecosystem May 2015 32 COMPETITIVE ASSESSMENT PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence Electronic Warfare Supply Chain Tiers Tier 1: Platforms and Systems The major defense primes have absorbed some Tier II capabilities in order to maintain unique selling positions while continuing to lowering the overhead cost base

Most of the Tier I firms have acquired technology and capability to pursue the high-margin work associated with cutting edge technology such as Electronic Attack Tier II: Sub-Systems Producing both custom and commoditized sub-systems such as RF Switches, Filters, and Receivers Many of the companies currently making sub-systems for major platforms and defense primes have aspirations to move up the value chain, producing complete systems such as EW stimulators and EW pods Tier III: Components and Integrated Components Maintain high volume production/manufacturing capability Many Tier III companies maintain both build-to-print capability and are able to engineer integrated components Larger Tier III firms maintain both custom build and build-toprint capability with extensive inventories and broad COTSbased product offerings EPDs direct competitors are looking to move EPDs direct competitors are looking to move up upthe thevalue valuechain, chain,beginning beginningtotocompete competewith

with their historical buyers creating opportunities their historical buyers creating opportunities within withinthe thesystems systemsand andintegrated integratedcomponents components segment of the market segment of the market May 2015 33 PROJECT JUPITER: Market Due Diligence Market Positioning: Key Takeaways The EW Market Is Growing US DoD and foreign governments understand the importance of EW and budgets dedicated to this mission will continue to grow even amidst ongoing fiscal pressures Radar, missile, and tactical communications budgets are all expected to grow over the forecasted period The applications of technologies included in the EW spectrum are merging and lines between communication, cyber, ISR and many others are blurring EPD Understands Place Within EW Supply Chain EPDs current technology focuses on Radar and Electronic Surveillance receive functions Programs included in managements forecasted pipeline, with the exception of SEWIP BLK III, include opportunities within EPDs current technological capabilities SEWIP BLK III will provide EPD an opportunity to develop and compete for a new capability within the EW marketplace

DoD Acquisition Has Increased Focused On EW Technology Requirements and product development will focus on modular, reprogrammable solutions with common interfaces Commercial technology will be leveraged in order to quicken the pace of DoD technology development and maintain superiority relative to a quickly evolving threat environment A system of systems will be used for battlefield management across the EW spectrum New systems will include technology spanning the spectrum, including communication, cyber-security, surveillance, detection, tracking all working simultaneously together May 2015 34 Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 35 Questions 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 36 Appendices 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Market positioning Presentation to Investors and s Analyst Briefing 2015 Investors and Analysts SLIDE 37 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 38 Old divisions Tactical & Sonar Systems Aircraft &

Vehicle Information & Power Systems Naval Systems Tactical Systems Aircraft & Vehicle Systems Infrastructure & Power 3 Phoenix 3eTI Controls Airport Systems Avalon Systems Communication & Integrated Systems CEMS EMS Precision Air & Land Systems Nuclear Control Systems Nuclear Sensors &

Process Instrumentatio n PMES Command & Control Flightline Maritime Systems Ocean Systems Sonar Systems GigaSat TCS ID Secure Intelligence Systems Advanced Tactical Systems ProLogic/ SOTECH Forensic Technology USSI 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data Analyst Briefing 2015 SLIDE 39 New divisions Aerospace & Infrastructure Communicatio

ns & Security Maritime & Land Airport Systems 3eTI 3 Phoenix Controls Nuclear Control Systems Nuclear Sensors & Process Instrumentatio n Precision Air & Land Systems Advanced Tactical Systems Communication & Integrated Systems Avalon Systems Command & Control EMS Forensic Technology Flightline GigaSat

Maritime Systems ID Ocean Systems ProLogic/ SOTECH PMES TCS Sonar Systems USSI 2015 Ultra Electronics: Proprietary Data

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