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HOME LEARNING The Woman in White. Question 1 Look at lines 1-8. What four things from this section of text that tell us about Lady Glydes state. The Woman in White The company was my mistress's niece, and the back bedroom on the rst oor was got ready for her. My mistress mentioned to me that Lady Glyde (that was her name) was in poor health, and that I must be particular in my cooking accordingly. She was to come that day, as well as I can remember but, whatever you do, don't trust my memory in the matter. I am sorry to say it's no use asking me about days of the month, and suchlike. Except Sundays, half my time I take no heed of them; being a hard-working woman and no scholar. All I know is, Lady Glyde came; and, when she did come, a ne fright she gave us all, surely. I don't know how master brought her to the house, being hard at work at the time. But he did bring her, in the afternoon, I think; and the housemaid opened the door to them, and showed them into the parlour. Before she had been long down in the kitchen again with me, we heard a hurry-skurry, up-stairs, and the parlour bell ringing like mad, and my mistress's voice calling out for help. We both ran up; and there we saw the lady laid on the sofa, with her face ghastly white,

and her hands fast clenched, and her head drawn down to one side. She had been taken with a sudden fright my mistress said; and master he told us she was in a t of convulsions. I ran out, knowing the neighbourhood a little better than the rest of them, to fetch the nearest doctor's help. The nearest help was at Goodricke's and Garth's, who worked together as partners, and had a good name and connexion, as I have heard, all round St. John's Wood. Mr. Goodricke was in; and he came back with me directly. The Woman in White The company was my mistress's niece, and the back bedroom on the rst oor was got ready for her. My mistress mentioned to me that Lady Glyde (that was her name) was in poor health, and that I must be particular in my cooking accordingly. She was to come that day, as well as I can remember but, whatever you do, don't trust my memory in the matter. I am sorry to say it's no use asking me about days of the month, and suchlike. Except Sundays, half my time I take no heed of them; being a hard-working woman and no scholar. All I know is, Lady Glyde came; and, when she did come, a ne fright she gave us all, surely. I don't know how master brought her to the house, being hard at work at the time. But he did bring her, in the afternoon, I think; and the housemaid opened the door to them, and showed them into the parlour. Before she had been long down in the kitchen again with me, we heard a hurry-skurry, up-stairs, and the parlour bell ringing like mad, and my mistress's voice calling out for help. We both ran up; and there we saw the lady laid on the sofa, with her face ghastly white,

and her hands fast clenched, and her head drawn down to one side. She had been taken with a sudden fright my mistress said; and master he told us she was in a t of convulsions. I ran out, knowing the neighbourhood a little better than the rest of them, to fetch the nearest doctor's help. The nearest help was at Goodricke's and Garth's, who worked together as partners, and had a good name and connexion, as I have heard, all round St. John's Wood. Mr. Goodricke was in; and he came back with me directly. QUESTION 2 Question 2 Language Analysis Worth 8 marks spend 10 minutes answering it in 2 PEELA paragraphs AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and inuence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views This question assesses language: Words / Phrases / Language Features / Language Techniques / Sentence Forms Look at the source. Look at lines.How does the writer use language to describe/show.? Include:

Words and phrases Language features and techniques Sentence forms. Question 2: Language Analysis Level Skills Descriptor 4 Analyses the effects of the writers choices of language Perceptive, Selects a judicious range of quotations detailed Uses sophisticated subject terminology accurately 7-8 marks

3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Clearly explains the effects of the writers choices of language Selects a range of relevant quotations Uses subject terminology accurately F A R O Opinions: Personal thoughts

Rhetorical Questions or Repetition. Facts & Figures: Using numbers to support your ideas All Figures of Speech: Simile, Metaphor, Personification E Emotive language: Words used to trigger your feelings S T (Rule of) Three

Sounds Alliteration. Assonance. Sibilance. Onomatopoeia Lamb to the Slaughter 3 she was returning to her husband And now, she told herself as she hurriedPage back home, and he was waiting for his supper. She had to cook it well and make it taste as good as possible, because the poor man was tired; and if she found anything unusual or terrible when she got home, then it would be a shock and she would have to react with grief and horror. Of course, she was not expecting to nd anything unusual at home. She was just going home with the vegetables on Thursday evening to cook dinner for husband. That's the way, she told herself. Do everything normally. Keep things absolutely natural and there'll be no need for acting at all. As she entered the kitchen by the back door, she was quietly singing to herself. "Patrick!" she called. "How are you, darling?" She put the package on the table and went into the living room; and when she saw him

lying there on the oor, it really was a shock. All the old love for him came back to her, and she ran over to him, knelt down beside him, and began to cry hard. It was easy. No acting was necessary. A few minutes later, she got up and went to the phone. She knew the number of the police station, and when the man at the other end answered, she cried to him. "Quick! Come quickly! Patrick's dead." QUESTION 2 PRACTICE How does the writer use language to describe Marys reaction to the death of her husband? Highlight parts of the section that could be used to answer this question and annotate the techniques which are used. And now, she told herself as she hurried back home, she was returning to her husband and he was waiting for his supper. She had to cook it well and make it taste as good as possible, because the poor man was tired; and if she found anything unusual or terrible when she got home, then it would be a shock and she would have to react with grief and horror. Of course, she was not expecting to nd anything unusual at home. She was just going home with the vegetables on Thursday evening to cook dinner for husband.

That's the way, she told herself. Do everything normally. Keep things absolutely natural and there'll be no need for acting at all. As she entered the kitchen by the back door, she was quietly singing to herself. "Patrick!" she called. "How are you, darling?" She put the package on the table and went into the living room; and when she saw him lying there on the oor, it really was a shock. All the old love for him came back to her, and she ran over to him, knelt down beside him, and began to cry hard. It was easy. No acting was necessary. A few minutes later, she got up and went to the phone. She knew the number of the police station, and when the man at the other end answered, she cried to him. "Quick! Come quickly! Patrick's dead." And now, she told herself as she hurried back home, she was returning to her husband and he was waiting for his supper. She had to cook it well and make it taste as good as possible, because the poor man was tired; and if she found anything unusual or terrible when she got home, then it would be a shock and she would have to react with grief and horror. Of course, she was not expecting to nd anything unusual at home. She was just going home with the vegetables on Thursday evening to cook dinner for husband. That's the way, she told herself. Do everything normally. Keep things absolutely

natural and there'll be no need for acting at all. As she entered the kitchen by the back door, she was quietly singing to herself. "Patrick!" she called. "How are you, darling?" She put the him lying there to her, and she easy. No acting package on the table and went into the living room; and when she saw on the oor, it really was a shock. All the old love for him came back ran over to him, knelt down beside him, and began to cry hard. It was was necessary. A few minutes later, she got up and went to the phone. She knew the number of the police station, and when the man at the other end answered, she cried to him. "Quick! Come quickly! Patrick's dead." CONNECTIVE Firstly, then,

more importantly, ironically, significantly, later on, in addition, interestingly, finally, to conclude POINT says, points out, insists, claims, decides, concludes, asserts, quotes, gives examples of, lists, thinks, mocks, laughs at, ridicules, asks, hints, suggests, examines, comments, explores, praises, continues, describes, reports, admits

EVIDENCE + EXPLANATIO N LANGUAGE ANALYSIS + AUDIENCE that _____ Words/ phrases such as which suggests. The simile/metaphor/personification etc which suggests/highlights/ shows/emphasises to the reader that How does the writer use language to describe Marys reaction to the death of her husband? Firstly, Roald Dahl uses repetition to emphasise Marys mixed reaction to her

husbands death. Initially, she plans to act shocked however upon returning home it really was a shock, and she began to cry hard before she called the police and cried again. This shows her changing emotions about her actions. The use of the word shock is ironic as Mary has killed him and so should not be surprised by the sight of his dead body. Arguably, the shock is her realising exactly what she has done which then makes her cry hard. Furthermore, the fact that she is crying indicates that she is genuinely upset especially as it states that no acting was necessary. This repetition emphasises to the reader how upset and distressed Mary is at the murder which she has committed and the sight of the dead body of her husband. EVALUATION Question 2: Language Analysis Level Skills Descriptor 4 Analyses the effects of the writers choices of

language Perceptive, Selects a judicious range of quotations detailed Uses sophisticated subject terminology accurately 7-8 marks 3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Clearly explains the effects of the writers choices of language Selects a range of relevant quotations Uses subject terminology accurately End of page 3 / Top of page 4

How does the writer use language to describe the actions of the detectives? 5 minutes to annotate - 10 minutes to write In a few words she told her story about going to the grocer and coming back, when she found him on the oor. While she was crying and talking, Noonan found some dried blood on the dead man's head. He hurried to the phone. Some other men began to arrive -- a doctor, two detectives, a police photographer, and a man who knew about ngerprints. The detectives kept asking her a lot of questions. They always treated her kindly. She told them how she'd put the meat into the oven -- "it's there now"--and how she had gone to the grocer's for vegetables and how she came back to nd him lying on the oor. The two detectives were exceptionally nice to her. They searched the house. Sometimes Jack Noonan spoke to her gently. He told her that her husband had been killed by a blow to the back of the head. They were looking for the weapon. The murderer might have taken it with him, but he might have thrown it away or hidden it. --- "It's the old story," he said. "Get the weapon, and you've got the murderer." Later, one of the detectives sat down beside her. Did she know, he asked, of

anything in the house that could have been used as a weapon? Would she look around to see if anything was missing. HOME LEARNING: Small Island How does the writer use language to describe the effect of the hurricane? Include: Words and phrases Language features and techniques Sentence forms Annotate the extract and write a PEELA paragraph in response to the question.

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