Go Figure! - Weebly

Go Figure! - Weebly

Go Figure! Recognizing Figurative Language The opposite of literal language. Figurative language is language that means more than what it says on the surface. It usually gives us a feeling about its subject. Types of Figurative Language

Simile Metaphor Extended Metaphor Personification Onomatopoeia Alliteration Hyperbole Irony Apostrophe

Metonymy Synecdoche Imagery Juxtaposition Oxymoron

Understatement Parody Assonance Allegory

Satire Symbolism idioms Simile A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are strong as iron bands.

Metaphor A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon wrapped through the desert.

Personification A figure of speech which gives the qualities of a person to an animal, an object, or an idea. Example: The wind yells while blowing." (The wind cannot yell. Only a living thing can yell.) Onomatopoeia The use of words

that mimic sounds. Example: The firecracker made a loud kaboom! Alliteration Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words. Example: 1. She was wide-eyed and wondering

while she waited for Walter to waken. 2. She sells seashells by the seashore'. Hyperbole An exaggerated statement used to heighten effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to emphasize a point. Example:

Shes said so on several million occasions. IRONY The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. Three main types: Verbal, Dramatic, and Situational Verbal: It was very nice of you to open my letter. Thank you very much. Situational: A fire station burning down. Dramatic: In Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Romeo finds Juliet in a drugged state and he thinks she is dead. He kills himself. When Juliet wakes up she finds Romeo dead and kills herself. APOSTROPHE ADDRESSING PERSONIFIED OBJECTS AS REAL PERSONS,THE ABSENT AS IF THEY WERE PRESENT AND THE DEAD AS IF THEY WERE ALIVE. Ex. "Oh, freedom! Hear our cry!"

METONYMY A figure of speech where a name of one thing is replaced with the name of something that is closely associated with it. Ex: We have always remained loyal to the crown SYNECDOCHE A part is used to represent a whole

Example: 1. The poor woman has ten hungry mouths to feed. 2. The sputtering economy could make the difference if you're trying to get a deal on a new set of wheels. Idiom A group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the

individual words Example: 1. He jumped the gun. 2. She has a chip on her shoulder. Imagery Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses in the readers

mind. Sight Hearing Touch Taste Smell sight: The rose is bright red hearing: It sounds like the chirping of several birds, with their high voices.

smell: The air smells like going to the countryside. Fresh and green. No smell of smoke but the fresh waters and the leaves. touch: It feels bumpy yet gives off a welcoming warmth. taste: It tastes sweet yet spicy at once, with a tinge of orange taste. Quiz! Choose the best answer.

The sea licked the grass at the edge of the shore. The sentence above is an example of a/an a. simile b. personification c. metaphor d. idiom You're just throwing money down the drain.

2. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. metaphor b. idiom c. personification d. simile These walls have ears. 3. The sentence above is an example of a/an a. simile

b. personification c. metaphor d. idiom His room was a junk pile. 4. The sentence above is an example of a/an a. simile b. metaphor c. personification d. idiom

The train was an angry animal roaring down the tracks. 5. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. metaphor b. simile c. idiom d. personification The mother is a tigress in

defending her children. 6. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. idiom b. metaphor c. simile d. personification The baby's skin was like a rose petal. 7. The above sentence is an

example of a/an a. personification b. idiom c. metaphor d. simile His pen flew across the page, frantically trying to catch up to what the teacher was saying. 8. The above sentence is an example of a/an

a. personification b. metaphor c. idiom d. simile The moonless night was dark as black velvet. 9. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. simile b .metaphor

c. idiom d. personification The sheets hanging on the clothesline danced in the wind. 10. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. simile b. personification c. idiom d. Metaphor

The hungry waves grabbed our sand castle and pulled it into the foamy sea. 11. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. idiom b. simile c. metaphor d. personification

The bacon was sizzling in the frying pan. 12. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. personification b. hyperbole c. onomatopoeia d. metaphor Some students would rather eat dirt and die than have to sit down and read a book.

13. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. onomatopoeia b. hyperbole c. idiom d. personification Jovial Jake joined Judy for juice. 14. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. onomatopoeia

b. hyperbole c. personification d. alliteration Pop bottle, pop bottles in pop shops. Pop bottles, pop bottles, little Pops drops 15. The above sentence is an example of a/an a. alliteration b. hyperbole c. personification

d. alliteration Teaching Similes and Metaphors Alliteration Lesson Plan and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/1allitera.htm Hyperbole- Lesson Plans and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/10lesson.htm Idiom Lesson Plan http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/6lesson.htm Imagery- Lesson Plans and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/imagery2.htm

Lesson Plan for Puns http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/5lesson.htm Onomatopoeia- Lesson Plans and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/9lesson.htm Personification Lesson Plans and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/7lesson.ht m Proverbs- Lesson Plans and Resources http://volweb.utk.edu/Schools/bedford/harrisms/proverbs2.htm

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