Evidence of Professional Practice

Evidence of Professional Practice

EVIDENCE OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE Danielle Inwood 2008 Sunbury Downs Secondary College INDEX ANALYSIS OF A SEQUENCE OF TEACHING & LEARNING: Component 1: Component 2: Component 3: Component 4: Component 5: Establishing the Teaching Context A Teaching and Learning Sequence Detail of Two Teaching and Learning Activities Analysis of Student Learning A Reflection on the Planned Teaching and Learning Process COLLEGIATE CLASSROOM ACTIVITY RECORD: Component 6: Component 7: The Provisional Teachers Classroom The Mentors Classroom COMMENTARY ON PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Component 8: Component 9: Record of Professional Activities Commentary on Professional Learning from Activities ANALYSIS OF A SEQUENCE OF TEACHING & LEARNING Component 1: Establishing the Teaching Context Sunbury Downs is a moderately sized co-educational secondary college for students from Years 7-12. Students are not ethnically diverse with most being of Anglo origin. Our students come to the College with English as their main language. While the students are orally literate, many struggle with complex forms of written English. A moderate proportion of the parent group have attained a tertiary level of education. The biggest step I have needed to take is to develop the units of work without a detailed curriculum framework. This is currently occurring on a school level which aims to complete a unit of work for each subject/year level by the end of the year. I have gained some previous work from experienced teachers and with newly developed projects have formed a unit of work. This unit of work has been shared between other teachers but is not definitive in each class. Teaching Science to two Year 9 classes as a graduate teacher has given me the opportunity to change work programs that have not worked effectively and trial other programs. The analysis of this teaching and learning sequence comes from my 9A class of 21 students. The class represents a wide range of learning needs. There are five students that would understand guidelines and tasks and work with minimal supervision. One of

these students is diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome and has a teacher aide assigned to one class per week. Around 9 students represent challenges in the classroom as they are disengaged or have literacy issues that do not receive support. The remaining students prefer to stay under the radar than excel themselves in class. The task when working with 9A would be to ensure that activities cater for all students, providing extension activities for more able students and adjusting work to enable more support and behaviour management for the less able students. The class is very chatty and there has been an increase in the bullying behaviour of some students. Consequently, the learning environment needs to become safe where students behave appropriately both in class work and practical sessions. The physical learning environment is also challenging. The majority of these classes are in a small laboratory classroom with limited room for movement. I have been displaying students work around the laboratory in order to increase their effort and presentation of work. It also gives them a sense of ownership or connectedness to the room (and science too). We also have one class a week in a computer room. Component 2: A Teaching and Learning Sequence Unit: Class: The Brain & Nervous System Year 9 At the end of this 5 week unit students should have an understanding on how the nervous system and brain work. They should be able to explain components such as a motor & sensory neurone, reflex action, locations and names of brain parts as well has the texture and feeling of this internal organ. They should be able to compare these organs between animals such as human and sheep.

They will build skills in researching, practical report writing, dissecting, model building and ICT. The prior knowledge and/or skill that the students needed were: 1. How to write up practical reports 2. How to research using the library and internet 3. No prior knowledge was required for information on the nervous system and brain. The teaching and learning activities that enabled the students to engage with and achieve their learning aims included ICT activities, the immersion activity, sheep brain dissection, a video, model building, poster making, experiments. To assist students with literacy difficulties a glossary was made. For students with behavioural issues I chose their dissecting partners to avoid issues of safety. Having the laboratory technician assist during this lesson also minimised issues. The science rooms were used during dissections and ICT rooms during research lessons. The lessons were planned around the timetabled rooms. The research activity enabled me to move around to individual students and monitor their student learning. It enabled them to develop ideas in the concept before applying their knowledge to dissections. This unit of work engaged students and this enabled me to move around the class and monitor the students and the work they were doing. They were able to explore throughout the unit in different areas of research and dissections. I constantly used questions to monitor student learning and help explain the topic. I used a video to introduce concepts, build on their understanding and help explain the topic. Dissections allowed students to elaborate on the information they researched and apply their new knowledge. Through a variety of assessment tasks I was able to evaluate and monitor student learning. Students performance in this section of the unit was assessed according to:

Completion of tasks and organization of workbooks Research assignment and experiment booklet Referencing for the research assignment Class discussions Practical report on sheep brain dissection Group work during the dissection Unit Plan Week Session Activity Referenc e 1 1 Concept cartoon plant & animal function Introduce homework sheet Introduce nervous system research

assignment Ref 1 Ref 2 Ref 3 2+3 Nervous system research assignment 4 Nervous system research assignment 1 Nervous system research assignment 2+3 Nervous system research assignment 4 Nervous system research assignment 1 Nervous system internet activity

Ref 4 2+3 EXP Nerves and microscopes & Build a neurone Text 96 Ref 5 4 Human body video Brain Power Ref 6 1 Brain immersion activity and quiz Ref 7 2+3 EXP Sheep brain dissection Ref 8 4

Report write-up & dissection website 1 Report write-up & dissection website 2 3 4 5 Codes ICT Room Library Booking EXP Experiment Text 96 School text reference page Reference 1: Concept Cartoon 1. The concept cartoon was to introduce the topic and discover students prior knowledge. They worked individually to identify their thoughts and opinions then discussed these within the class.

Reference 2: Homework Task 2. The homework sheet was developed to cater for the different students and learning requirements. Yet it would also enable them to increase their complexity of thinking. It followed Blooms Taxonomy & Multiple Intelligence Frameworks. Students were required to hand one homework task in each Tuesday. A work record

was also given to allow students to record their work. Reference 3: Research Assignment 3. This nervous system research assignment was a booklet that would allow students to research the nervous system at their own level rather than the old style chalk-&-talk. They would be allowed 2 weeks to work on and complete the research task. Included in the assignment were short experiments that would apply concepts they were learning about (i.e. reflex actions). An assessment matrix was given at the start of the year and it was explain that students should follow these for their marks. The assessment on the booklet aligned with the assessment matrix previously given. A glossary also provided the students with literacy needs to clarify terms used. There was also an additional research project for those who showed advanced knowledge or had an interest on the topic. Reference 4: Internet Activity 4. The internet activity enable students to reflect on their learning about the nervous system and build on that knowledge by seeing the different nerve regions and complexity of nerves. It also enabled more ICT learning. Reference 5: Internet Activity

5. The practical began with students being able to use microscopes to see sections of nerves and brain components. During this time students were also asked to build models of nerves. This provided an opportunity for group work and reflection on the nerves before moving on to the brain. Reference 6: Brain Power Video 6. The brain power video gave students a visual representation of how nerves work and an example of a nerve being fired. This is something they would not have been able to see during an experiment. The video provided reflection on nerves as well as how nerves tie into the next topic the brain. Reference 7: Brain Immersion & Quiz 7. These activities were used to introduce the brain and how it can be compared with different objects. It would help them think about these things in response to

the dissection. It also allowed students who did not want to be involved in the dissection to understand the brain without necessarily dissecting it. Reference 8: Sheep Brain Dissection 8. The sheep brain dissection was used to further engage the students. It would also be used as an assessment task. It enabled them to see and feel what they have learnt and also enable higher order thinking. Component 3: Detail of Two Teaching and Learning Activities ACTIVITY 1: Research Assignment Following the concept cartoon the research assignment (Reference 3) was given. Students received a booklet containing the research assignment

and other assessment tasks. Students were told there would be 8 lessons in which they would have to research the topic. The final product would be the development of a pamphlet as well as complete the experiments in the booklet. Additional work included the Multiple Sclerosis assignment. A library session was booked to enable them access to research materials including books, computers and newspapers. I supervised and guided them to websites and books, using a lot of time to also manage student behaviour. This assignment was designed to provide students with student based learning. It was hoped that by the end of the activity the students would have achieved more knowledge than by teacher based learning.

This task also provided an opportunity for students to build on ICT and research skills. Students were instructed to finish the assignment for homework. ACTIVITY 2: Sheep Brain Dissection The sheep brain dissection was also an assessment task (Reference 8). We went through the dissection method and the lab technician was introduced and present during the lesson. Students were sent to lab tables where they were assigned partners. This was because there were many with possible behavioural issues that needed to be controlled and less tempted to do the wrong thing if away from the other students. The final product would be a detailed practical report including sketches of the brain and answers to questions.

They would be given two additional lessons to research answers to the discussion questions and type up their report if preferred. I supervised and guided them to names and areas of the brain and also promoted self learning. Alternative online dissections were provided to those students who felt uncomfortable with this prac. This dissection was designed to provide students with a hands on dissection to extend their knowledge and develop higher order thinking. It would provide an opportunity to summarise their learning in a practical sense. Component 4: Analysis of Student Learning PROFILE: Student A PROFILE: Student B Student A is a high achiever who is highly capable across all subject areas.

He has been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome. Student B presents with significant behavioural difficulties. He has issues outside of school and has been expelled from a previous school. There is also an issue with his inconsistent attendance and organisation. He works excellently independently and regularly asks questions to confirm his understanding of the topic, tasks and outcomes required. He prefers highly structured tasks in which he knows what he is required to complete in the lesson. He becomes stressed if required to define his own end product. He works well with peers but is easily frustrated by students who are less engaged than him. He also has a competitive nature but prefers to avoid competitions in which he becomes very stressed. Specific learning goals for Student A were: To develop his research and practical writing skills in science.

To extend his research and processing skills. To develop his skills in dissection and group work with peers. To develop his interpersonal skills to deal with stressful situations. He shows he is able to comprehend the work however lacks the appropriate effort and initiation. As a result, work is often not fully completed and submission of work is inconsistent. He does not complete homework. His behaviour can deteriorate quickly if he remains unsettled, unfocused and unengaged. His commitment to work occurs in spurts and he is often distracted by anything and everything. Specific learning goals for Student A were: To develop his research and practical writing skills in science. To complete assessment tasks and hand them in. To improve on his behaviour in

the class room Annotated Work Samples Student A Research Pamphlet Student A completed this task with minimal assistance. He understood the aim of the task quickly and was able to apply himself to complete the work satisfactorily. He successfully described terms and processes in his own words showing a clear understanding of the concepts. His work is neat

and organised so that information is easily followed (i.e. contents page). Annotated Work Samples Student A Sheep Brain Dissection Student A produced an excellent example of a Prac Report on the Sheep Brain Dissection. He shows a clear understanding and ability to elaborate on his knowledge learnt during the Research Pamphlet and apply his new knowledge and skills. Annotated Work Samples Student B Research Pamphlet Student B has successfully produced a pamphlet on the nervous system. The dotted lines indicate work completed before being prompted. He showed little understanding of the tasks aim and constantly

required prompting. However he rarely produces completed works and this was an achievement for this student. Unfortunately he doesnt describe the terms in his own words and this would limit his understanding of concepts. I was however happy to receive a completed task from this student. Annotated Work Samples Student B Kidney Dissection Student B was unfortunately away during the Sheep Brain Dissection. However, was present during a Kidney Dissection which followed the Sheep Brain Unit and as a result I have chosen to add this as his work sample. Again Student B produced a prac report with little effort however by receiving another completed task this was an achievement in itself. He has managed to improve from the start of the year by including an aim and method and over the year will attempt to improve this so it includes all titles (results, discussion, conclusion).

Student B clearly requires constant support in order to complete tasks. Component 5: A Reflection on the Planned Teaching and Learning Process Most students were engaged throughout the unit: using ICT, Dissections and Videos catered well for the different types of learners in the class. The quality of research, discussions and group work during dissections

improved from that at the beginning of the year. The homework task sheet worked well as a modified work for one student who was presented with severe learning difficulties. Students skills have developed in terms of researching and producing sound pieces of work. By the end of the unit most students were able to attempt and apply some knowledge of their research project to their dissections and evaluation tasks (quizzes, tests and work sheets). Student A was able to use my time effectively asking questions when needed. Student B was given feedback in Term 1 about how to improve on his report writing skills. He previously produced reports without titles. This was one improvement made in this report. Student B was also able to complete tasks which has been a problem throughout the year. Student B required constant supervision in order to complete tasks. Although Student B produced the work it used a lot of time supervising him. I am worried that the time spent with Student B will impact on my time spent with other students trying to work. I also need to observe more students that are staying under the radar. The concept cartoon was not used effectively. Students tried to say their opinions over the top of other students. Next time I will allow only one student to discuss their view by holding the microphone. The library was not accessible this term and as a result had to replace these with computer rooms. Many students were too reliant on their text book for all the answers and did no additional research. In the next unit, this will be discussed and their aim will be to include other resources. Many students copied information word-for-word from their resources. In the next unit, this will be discussed and their aim will be to answer questions in their own words.

Their bibliography skills also need to be developed in the next unit. The Quality Learning Correlation Chart On completion of the unit I asked the students from the Year 9 class to complete a Quality Learning Correlation Chart. This enabled me to see what they thought they learnt and how engaging it was for them. It was good to see that majority believed they learnt quite a bit and liked it. It tells me there is still room for improvement in my ability to provide engaging lessons and this is something I will continue to work on. I hope that by attending more PDs my ability to engage students will improve. A lot 1 Quite a bit How much did I learn? Some 3 2 Not much Nothing Quality Learning Correlation Chart

7 2 1 1 Hated it Didnt like it Okay, I guess Liked it How much did I enjoy it? Loved it Letters to the teacher On completion of the unit I also asked the students to write a letter to me. In the letter I asked them to comment on: How they enjoyed the topic How much do they enjoy science

What things did they like doing this term What things would they like to do in future lessons What needs to be improved Am I treating them fairly I explained to them that they could be honest and that I wouldnt take offence to anything they would write. As a result it gave me insight into their thoughts on the topic. The letters follow on. Overall, most of the students found parts of the topic interesting. They enjoyed learning about their body and how it works. I learnt from these letters that some students I thought were engaged werent. To improve on this I have involved them in the curriculum of the next topic where they get to choose what the want to learn. I also took away that some students who were misbehaving in class knew they were and understood their punishment and didnt hold negative feelings. However, some students thought I was unfairly picking them out. From this it has made me more careful in who I choose to address when a group is talking. Instead of blaming one of the group I should use other behaviour modifications such as seating plans, modified work or discussing it with individual students away from their peers. By writing the letters I feel the student are able to express their feelings and ideas to the teacher. They may not get opportunities on a regular basis to do this and it allows them to express feelings and be anonymous if they want. Letters to the teacher Letters COLLEGIATE CLASSROOM ACTIVITY RECORD

What worked well in this teaching and learning activity to progress student learning? What did not work as well as expected? What would you do differently given the opportunity to repeat the activity? What have you learnt about your own teaching practice or about the students? Is there any professional learning you would like to pursue as a result of this reflection? Component 6: The Provisional Teachers Classroom (1) Discussion prior to activity Teachers Involved: Date: Michael Lynch 30/07/08

Focus for the Activity: Management of classroom behaviour during a practical experiment in science. The focus of this activity was to ensure I created and maintained a safe and challenging environment. The Planned Learning Activities and Outcomes: This practical experiment looked at the properties of light on mirrors. Using a raybox kit, students were put in pairs and moved to science benches to complete the practical experiment from Garton & Williamson (2005, p129). Once completed the experiment students were asked to write it up as a scientific report including: title, aim, method, results and discussion. I led the lesson and Mike acted as an observer. Other Contextual Information: This is not the first lesson they used the raybox kits, so minimal information was given to them on how to set them up. Discussion following the activity A Summary of the Teaching and Learning: The students set up their equipment effectively and efficiently. They worked well on the investigation and were obviously engaged. Your movement around the class and positioning when not at a bench helped maintain a safe environment and student focus. Students often have difficulty with a report after practical activity so they need to understand the importance of it and accept it as the norm. Mike Lynch Reflection on the Activity: The students enjoyed the darkened room and provided a way to engage them. They were able to observe and apply the properties of light learnt in previous research on

the topic. The activity didnt maintain their interest over the entire class session and that they lost their engagement when asked to write up the activity as a report. We did a share session at the end to understand what was required in the report and why we needed to do it. It also reiterated the concepts introduced and enabled the students to clarify their understanding. Component 6: The Provisional Teachers Classroom (2) Discussion prior to activity Teachers Involved: Date: Anina Alexander 18/09/08 Focus for the Activity: Delivery of information during a practical experiment in science. The focus of this activity was to ensure I created and maintained a safe and challenging environment. The Planned Learning Activities and Outcomes: This practical experiment looked at the use of fingerprints in Forensic Science. Students were put in pairs and moved to science benches to complete the practical experiment from Garton & Williamson (2005, p183). Once completed the experiment students were asked to write it up as a summary report including: title, results and conclusion. I led the lesson and Anina acted as an observer. Other Contextual Information: There would be 3 activities during this double session attempting to provide an

engaging class for the end of term. Discussion following the activity A Summary of the Teaching and Learning: The introduction to the activity was good. Students knew what they had to do when they moved to the side bench to carry out the experiment. Students were engaged and Danielle created a safe and challenging environment Anina Alexander Reflection on the Activity: The students knew about fingerprints and enjoyed the activity. We then extended this knowledge by looking at obtaining prints from different surfaces and looking at them under different microscopes (light and stereo). Following the fingerprint activities the were looking at collecting evidence using UV and stains. All together most of the students were engaged for the entire lessons and enjoyed not having to write up all the activities as a scientific report and more as a summary report. This was a final activity in understanding how we can collect evidence for Forensic Science. At the end we did a share session to understand what different methods of collecting evidence are and how accurate these can be. Component 7: The Mentors Classroom (1) Discussion prior to activity Teachers Involved: Date: Anina Alexander 08/09/08 Focus for the Activity: The focus of this activity was to observe the delivery of information during a practical

experiment in science. It also focused on ensuring that a safe and challenging environment was maintained. The Planned Learning Activities and Outcomes: Anina prepared a heart dissection for the students. Prior to this classroom information had been delivered to the students. This was now a practical session to apply the knowledge that they learnt in a practical sense. Students were highly engaged throughout the lesson. Other Contextual Information: Discussion following the activity A Summary of the Teaching and Learning: Students were engaged throughout the lesson. Some students didnt follow instructions properly and dissected the heart wrongly. However Anina postively reinforced how to dissect for future events and made them observe the structures by viewing other students dissections. Students were engaged enough to enable both teachers to move around the room and observe, ask questions and examine their ability in the lab. Reflection on the Activity: This was an excellent example of how to engage students. I learnt that the hands on practical activities enable students to understand and apply their knowledge that they had learnt in previous classes and if they hadnt been learning in previous classes created an interest for them to ask questions about how things worked. Component 7: The Mentors Classroom (2) Discussion prior to activity Teachers Involved:

Date: SB, JG August 6th, 2008. Session 2 Focus for the Activity: Look at a mathematic problem and observe year 8 students attempting to solve it with limited instruction on how to do it. The Planned Learning Activities and Outcomes: Show a picture of Venus DiMilo and explain to students that they are required to find the 2 lengths of her arms. They have a number of ways to solve it and it was up to the group of students (no more than 4) to come up with a consensus about their strategy of finding the lengths. They were given tools such as tape measures, measuring tapes, 30cm string lengths, pens and paper. They had time to work in groups to solve the problem and then return and explain their strategies. Other Contextual Information: Four year 8 classes were combined during this activity. Discussion following the activity A Summary of the Teaching and Learning: Students were engaged in the activity. Some students explained how they didnt know any maths yet they were able to find the answer. It was interesting to understand that students can use different ways to get an answer and they shouldnt be restricted to do this in the classroom. Teachers may teach one method of finding an answer, but have to be open to students working out different methods. Some students werent engaged and used the time to talk to students outside their classroom. I would be discussing this behaviour before the class in future to ensure more students are on task and not just allowing other students to control all the work.

Reflection on the Activity: Most students found an answer to the problem. Although the teacher didnt give them an exact answer, she wrote some of the groups answers on the board and had them explain the variety of ways they found it. One student came up during the working out phase and said she didnt know how to do maths but was happy she came up with a solution of her own which she believed was right. This activity was a way of engaging students in maths, which is something I am keen to include in my lessons. However, it is difficult to use these strategies when teaching set topics to students which they are unfamiliar with. This is more an activity you would do that wouldnt contribute to a topic area but would be used to engage students in maths generally. COMMENTARY ON PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: Component 8: Record of Professional Activities List of professional activities undertaken Nature of professional activity 1 2

Developing inquiry-based curriculum using an online planning tool (eUP) Standards 1, 2 VIT registration Firefox & Dreamweaver applications A survival Guide for Beginner Teachers* STAVCON 2008* 4 Report writing & exams Behaviour management and Student Engagement 3

The domain &/or standards the professional development activity addresses Standards 2, 4, 5, 8 All Domains All Domains Standards, 1, 6 Standards 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 All Domains MAVCON 2008* All Domains

Code- Nature of the professional activities Ace Professional Development Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 1. External to the school 2. Undertaken on the initiative of the teacher 3. Within the school with an external presenter 4. Within the school in collaboration with other colleagues * Commentary on these professional activities. Component 9: Commentary on Professional Learning from Activities Commentary on Professional Learning This can be found on my Blog: http://danielleinwood.wordpress.com STAVCON 2008 - November 28, 2008, 11:32 pm My first science focused PD which gave me access to a number of resources. Unfortunately I only attended 1 of the 2 days, but was opened to the resources and activities there are in the science and maths teaching realm. Landlearn - Engaging Students with Fieldwork and Real Science Experiences:

About providing schools with structure and support in the areas of sustainable agriculture and natural resource management. Unfortunately it was about excursions and support for Eastern Victoria which had little context for my current employment. However a benefit was learning about the Young Rural Scientist program they offer to students in collaboration with any DPI office. Here students can do a week of work experience with the aim of learning and being involved in an environmental project. Another benefit is that they offer free PDs at schools when more than 12 staff. LEGO Green Cars: This was a sales pitch for a lego kit. Although it would be an excellent resource to have in class it was expensive. They do have excursions in which they have stations and students can build a number of lego projects looking at environmental approaches to infrastructure. Arguably the Most Useful Free Online Resource: This was the most helpful session for the day. A teacher (Peter Razos) who has developed his own website with multiple science topics. Each topic has information, questions, experiments (with videos of results) and assessments. You do need to email him in order to access the online assessment program which enables you to make an online test in which students answer and can find out their answers online. These results are also emailed to you. An excellent resource for any science teacher. The Student Environmental Initiative: Ian MacDonnell gave insite into how he has established a student-controlled environmental groups at a number of schools. He suggests having a student decision-making body who meets weekly and manages their own set of activities to heighten environmental awareness. He explained a number of approaches in which students spent a weekend away doing one day of a community environmental program and the other of leisure (ie. snorkelling with seals at Sorento. Students have also created memberships ($2 fee - includes a badge, newsletter and priority access to activities). They made environmental displays, videos, websites, stalls and a student environmental conference. Component 9: Commentary on Professional Learning from Activities Commentary on Professional Learning This can be found on my Blog:

http://danielleinwood.wordpress.com STAVCON 2008 - November 28, 2008, 11:32 pm My first science focused PD which gave me access to a number of resources. Unfortunately I only attended 1 of the 2 days, but was opened to the resources and activities there are in the science and maths teaching realm. Landlearn - Engaging Students with Fieldwork and Real Science Experiences: About providing schools with structure and support in the areas of sustainable agriculture and natural resource management. Unfortunately it was about excursions and support for Eastern Victoria which had little context for my current employment. However a benefit was learning about the Young Rural Scientist program they offer to students in collaboration with any DPI office. Here students can do a week of work experience with the aim of learning and being involved in an environmental project. Another benefit is that they offer free PDs at schools when more than 12 staff. LEGO Green Cars: This was a sales pitch for a lego kit. Although it would be an excellent resource to have in class it was expensive. They do have excursions in which they have stations and students can build a number of lego projects looking at environmental approaches to infrastructure. Arguably the Most Useful Free Online Resource: This was the most helpful session for the day. A teacher (Peter Razos) who has developed his own website with multiple science topics. Each topic has information, questions, experiments (with videos of results) and assessments. You do need to email him in order to access the online assessment program which enables you to make an online test in which students answer and can find out their answers online. These results are also emailed to you. An excellent resource for any science teacher. The Student Environmental Initiative: Ian MacDonnell gave insite into how he has established a student-controlled environmental groups at a number of schools. He suggests having a student decision-making body who meets weekly and manages their own set of activities to heighten environmental awareness. He explained a number of approaches in which students spent a weekend away doing one day of a community environmental program and the other of leisure (ie. snorkelling with seals at Sorento. Students have also created memberships ($2 fee - includes a badge, newsletter and priority access to activities). They made

environmental displays, videos, websites, stalls and a student environmental conference. Component 9: Commentary on Professional Learning from Activities Commentary on Professional Learning This can be found on my Blog: http://danielleinwood.wordpress.com MAVCON 2008 - December 5, 2008, 9:27 am My first maths focused PD which gave me access to a number of resources. Many of these were hardcopy so I cannot link them to websites. Again I only attended 1 of the 2 days, but this was enough time to open me to the resources and activities available around maths. Prior to this I felt I was struggling to engage my students. Hopefully after these PDs I will able to implement more engaging mathematic classes. Engaging Mathematics Classes For Middle Years Students This session was discussed by Donna Krenn, who provided a possible structure to the classroom. She suggested having: 5 minute - Introductory automatic response 10 minute - Mental maths strategies time 25 minutes - Explicit teaching of a concept 10 minutes - Sharing new knowledge, results, ideas, conclusions She gave specific teaching activities for the first 15 minutes including: Tables football, Tables knockout, Basic facts challenge, Building the greatest sum, Whats my number and Beat the teacher. Although she explained these as primary activities, I feel it would still be enjoyable for years 7-10. Bungee Jumping and The Leaning Tower of Poser This session was enjoyable and practical. We did two investigation tasks relating to maths. These were out of the Solving Real Life Stuff with Maths textbooks (which we luckily have already at school). In the Bungee Jumping activity, we used rubber bands and 50g weights to determine the linear equation for our possible barbie bungee jumper. We did the activity and were told to extend it in the

classroom by having the students build reports on the activity including business cards, letterheads and a results report. In the Leaning Tower of Poser, we rolled up an A4 sheet of paper to simulate a tower. We then used methods to assess at what angle the tower fell over. This would then allow us to estimate when in the future, this tower would fall. Again they were required to do reports and present findings. What an engaging way to stimulate students and get them thinking about how the maths they are learning will help them. Improving Student Engagement and Results Through e-learning This was an advertising session for Matheletics. However, the program is another way to keep students engaged with maths. There were online maths races with students across the world, an online curriculum and questions database as well as an assessment program. As students are engaged through e-learning, this would be an excellent program to introduce into the school. Component 9: Commentary on Professional Learning from Activities Commentary on Professional Learning This can be found on my Blog: http://danielleinwood.wordpress.com MAVCON 2008 - Continued Project Based Learning in the 21st Century This was a discription of a project done by Lyn McGoldrick in a Yr 9 class. The class was given two terms in which they were to design a library for 21st century learning. The students were to form an architectural company and sumbit a proposal to redesign their school library. The teacher brought in an architect and it was clear that this program could be used in a number of subjects being an excellent integrated program. The project wasnt solely about learning maths, but was a way to engage students and get them to learn about area and budgeting in a way not obvious to a maths class. My only criticism is that building the library was a realistic project being done in the school. If this project based learning was to occur in another school setting it would have to have clear and visible reasons and outcomes for a class to do this. By the students seeing that their proposals could be considered in the

library development - they were more engaged. A SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR BEGINNER TEACHERS - December 1, 2008, 3:44 am This Workshop was run by ACER and was used as a reflection and discussion for beginner teachers. As a beginner teacher it was very valuable to meet with other beginning teachers and discuss our first years. We were able to reflect on teaching methods that worked and didnt work between us. I was able to receive advice on how to improve my effectiveness as a teacher. I was able to discuss rules and routines for a classroom, methods for self assessment, how to effectively manage student behaviour and how to have positive student relationships. The professional development activity provided very practical information that I will be able to put to good use in preparing for my classes next year.

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • DLA Director's External Briefing Template

    DLA Director's External Briefing Template

    Network Security Requirements to Safeguard CDI. DFARS Clause 252.204-7012 Safeguarding Covered Defense Information and Cyber Incident Reporting. b) Adequate security. The Contractor shall provide adequate security on all covered contractor information systems.
  • Chapter 9 Work  2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Slide

    Chapter 9 Work 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Slide

    Next, consider the spring by itself as the system. When the compressed spring is released, the decrease in the energy of the spring implies the work done by the block on the spring is negative. The force exerted on the...
  • I256: Applied Natural Language Processing

    I256: Applied Natural Language Processing

    The resulting network of meaningfully related words and concepts can be navigated with the browser. WordNet is also freely and publicly available for download. WordNet's structure makes it a useful tool for computational linguistics and natural language processing. NLTK includes...
  • Christian Humanists - LPS

    Christian Humanists - LPS

    Corbel MS Pゴシック Arial Wingdings 2 Wingdings Wingdings 3 Calibri Module 1_Module 2_Module 3_Module 4_Module 5_Module 6_Module Christian Humanists Definition: Christian Humanist Savonarola Erasmus Excerpts from The Praise of Folly Excerpts from The Praise of Folly Sir Thomas More Excerpts...
  • Farming STEMterprise

    Farming STEMterprise

    Drawing a line graph. Draw your graph on squared or graph paper. When deciding on a scale for your y axis, look at the data you have collected to see how large your range is.
  • La invención de la imprenta

    La invención de la imprenta

    * Profª Dra. Ana Sofía Pérez-Bustamante Mourier / Historia del Libro y la Lectura / Curso 2017-2018 Ars moriendi (1922), de Manuel Machado El tema del Ars moriendi, opuesto a lo que en el mundo clásico fue el Ars amandi...
  • Chapter 6 Electronic Structure of Atoms

    Chapter 6 Electronic Structure of Atoms

    To understand the electronic structure of atoms, one must understand the nature of electromagnetic radiation. ... (the "rainbow"), as one gets from a white light source. Only a . line spectrum. of discrete wavelengths is observed. Each element has a...
  • The Toledo Maya Land Rights Case The ongoing

    The Toledo Maya Land Rights Case The ongoing

    Wainwright, J. (2008). Decolonizing development: colonial power and the Maya. Blackwell Publishing ' We raise here, we grow here, we know the lands, and we survive on the land' ' It is about land, about culture, about the rules. It...