English, Literacies and policy contexts A

English, Literacies and policy contexts A

English, Literacies and Policy Contexts A Week Four Housekeeping Navigating Moodle: Hows it going? Next week, change of time change of venue: Canadian Lead PS Starting time 9.10 (See Moodle for more details) Readings: Set text, other readings Online basic skills test Questions/concerns Assessment Task One and referencing (APA) Assessment One Because assessments are all submitted through

Moodle you dont need to attach the plagiarism statement, you do this electronically when you submit. You dont need to provide a separate cover sheet, although you do need to ensure that your name and student number are on the front page of the document (in the header is fine). You do need to include the rubric in your submission. Assessment One All the files will be downloaded from Moodle so please ensure that your name is on the

file (eg John Smith Ass One). There is some flexibility with font, font size and spacing as long as the document is clearly set out and 'readable'. My personal preference is for Times New Roman 11 or 12 point with 1.5 spacing. Assessment One You dont need to provide a separate cover sheet, although you do need to ensure that your name and student number are on the front page of the document (in the header is fine). You do need to include the rubric in your

submission. Assessment One Extensions: There is a form and process for this. If you need to apply for an extension please email me the request using the required form. Unless there are exceptional circumstances you need to do this prior to the submission date. There is also a process for special consideration. Details of this are available on the Uni website (if you help locating the information please contact me).

Assessment One I encourage you to use Turnitin. This may even become a requirement for Assessment 2. Please create a Word document rather than a PDF, if this causes problems (eg Mac uses) please email or discuss this with me. Assessment Task One: Title: Self literacies Due date: Sunday 26th March Word count: 1500 words Weighting: 40% In this assignment we want you to think about yourself as a literacy learner at school, now and into the future

PART 1 (Approximately 1000 words) Describe how you learned to read and write. Discuss teaching strategies that were drawn upon and critique these strategies in relation to you as a learner. Think about your learning at home, school and beyond How do the ways in which you learned and were taught to read and write reflect some of the theoretical ideas related to literacy teaching and learning presented to you so far? How do ideas related to what is considered effective literacy teaching and learning reflect the ways in which you learned and were taught? How do current policy directions align or otherwise with your experiences? PART 2 (Approximately 500 words) Describe what you think you need to do in order to

build on your current strengths in literacy, language and literature to work towards becoming an effective and knowledgeable practitioner think about what you have learned about effective literacy teaching and learning and about current policy directions. When writing up your assignment it needs to be divided into 2 distinct parts and connections to the various ideas/ readings in this course need to be made where appropriate. EDFGC 5711 Rubric High Distinction Distinction

Credit Pass Fail Demonstrates connections between pedagogical practices and theoretical ideas explored in the readings and through the course and their own past present and future experiences of learning to read and write

15 marks Makes critical relevant connections between many of the pedagogical practices and the theoretical ideas explored in the readings and course material, and their own experiences of learning to read and write Makes very good informed connections between many of the pedagogical practices and the

theoretical ideas explored in the readings and course material, and their own experiences of learning to read and write Makes good connections between the pedagogical practices and the theoretical ideas explored in the readings, course material, and their own experiences of learning to read and write Attempts to make

connections between the pedagogical practices and the theoretical ideas explored in the readings and course material, and their experiences of learning to read and write Does not make relevant connections between the pedagogical practices and the theoretical ideas explored in the readings and course material, and their own experiences of learning to read and write.

Reflects on own past, present and future literacy learning experiences in relation to current policy and curriculum directions 15 marks Critically reflects on their own literacy learning experiences and makes excellent informed connections to current policy and curriculum directions

Reflects on their own literacy learning experiences making very good and informed connections to current policy and curriculum directions Reflects on their own literacy learning experiences and makes good connections to current policy and curriculum directions Reflects on their own

literacy learning experiences and attempts to make connections to current policy and curriculum directions Does not adequately identify and/or critically examine own literacy learning experiences in relation to current policy and curriculum directions Work is well presented, including proofreading for spelling and grammatical

errors and consistent and accurate referencing. 10 marks Work has been proofread. Shows a strong understanding of spelling and grammar. Ideas are expressed clearly and succinctly. Accurate paragraphing, referencing and consistent style. Work has been proofread Shows a very good understanding of spelling

and grammar. Ideas are expressed clearly. Accurate paragraphing, referencing and consistent style. Work has been proofread. Shows a good understanding of spelling and grammar. Cohesive writing style. Generally accurate use of paragraphing. and attempts to acknowledge sources and consistent referencing style.

Work has been proofread. Shows an understanding of spelling and grammar. Generally, writing is easy to follow. Makes a deliberate attempt to acknowledge sources. Insufficient proofreading. Multiple spelling and grammar errors. Ideas are not clearly conveyed. Referencing is inconsistent and/or inaccurate

Assessment One: Marking Criteria {see rubric for more details) Demonstrates connections between pedagogical practices and theoretical ideas explored in the readings and through the course and their own past present and future experiences of learning to read and write 15 marks Marking Criteria (continued) Reflects on own past, present and future literacy learning experiences in relation to current policy and curriculum directions.

15 marks Marking Criteria (continued) Work is well presented, including proofreading for spelling and grammatical errors and consistent and accurate referencing. 10 marks Reading reflections Developing Effective Readers and Writers Focus areas: Identifying what effective reading and writing involves (the skills and strategies students use).

Exploring the skills and strategies involved in the explicit and systematic teaching of reading and writing. Identifying classroom practices (program and organisation) that support the development of effective readers and writers. An Effective Program Effective teachers use a balanced approach to develop reading skills, They:

place meaning at the core of all reading recognises the interrelationship between reading and writing recognise the importance of code and context in reading place equal emphasis on the development of semantic, grammatical, graphophonic and visual/pictorial knowledge engage their students. They plan for and provide enjoyable, meaningful and achievable literacy experiences An Effective Program Effective teachers use a balanced approach to

develop reading skills. They recognise the importance of students devel oping effective strategies for processing both paper based and digital text An Effective Program Develops awareness and competency with a variety of text types, including: Narrative Poetry and songs Description

Transactional Recount Procedural Report Explanation Exposition Discussion Mixed genre Skills and Strategies: Decoding Code breakers use their knowledge of letter-sound relationships and high frequency sight words to decode print. (Hill, 2012, p. 197) Teachers support the role of code breaker by providing opportunities for children to develop their understanding of : the alphabet principle

phonemic awareness letter knowledge phonics They also develop (through both implicit and explicit teaching) knowledge and recall of common (sight) words (eg MIOOW words, Oxford First 100 words). Hill, S. (20012). Developing early literacy: assessment and teaching. South Yarra: Eleanor Curtain Publishing Reading for Meaning In groups list and discuss the features of and differences between literal, inferred and critical comprehension. You will find p. 280 of the set text (Tompkins et al.) helpful.

Reading for Meaning Effective meaning makers use thinking processes before, during and after reading. Levels of comprehension can vary according to tasks (listener v reader, fiction v non fiction). Reading for Meaning Fluency: Fluent readers understand what they are reading. They are able to apply a range of strategies to assist them when they read. The three components of reading fluency are: Accuracy

Reading Speed Prosody/Expression and phrasing Reading for Meaning Vocabulary knowledge: Students understand the meaning of familiar words and use word learning cues to support/develop their understanding of what they read. These include words linked to childrens oral language, including common words. new words (eg theme words) that are introduced to the children Vocabulary knowledge and reading achievement are closely linked (Tompkins et

Developing Comprehension Strategies Differing text types may require the use of different comprehension strategies. These may include: using prior knowledge predicting questioning visualising prioritising self monitoring (re reading, checking new vocabulary) summarising Task: In groups select a text (from the materials provided) and discuss which comprehension strategies would support a young student reading this text. Create some literal, interpretive and inferential questions that would assist you in gauging a childs understanding of this text.

Maintaining Meaning Teachers know that efficient readers combine information from all cue systems fluently and automatically to maintain meaning as they: use cues to decode words in a text identify errors and make corrections (self correct) When students make errors or pause when reading a loud, teachers use prompts to encourage student to effectively use cueing strategies. CAFE/Daily Five The Two Sisters, Gail Boushey and Joan Moser

CAFE menu Comprehension Accuracy Fluency Expand Vocabulary In groups create a CAF menu for a group of young literacy learners. Make a list of strategies for each area. For more informations http://www.thedailycafe.com/ and http://www.the2sisters.com/theDaily5.html The Four Roles of the Reader In groups discuss the four roles of the reader as outlined by Luke and Freebody. List each of the roles and then brainstorm

what skills and strategies need to be developed to support each role. Discuss and list teaching activities and approaches that will support learning in each areas. Shared Reading Discuss : The role of the teacher, the role of the students and the strategies and skills that can be developed through the implementation of shared reading.

Give consideration to: Matching students to text (reading level and interest). The three main steps in a reading lesson (before, during and after). Determining cue/s you will focus on. How you will know if the lesson is successful Guided Reading: Discuss : The role of the teacher, the role of the students and the strategies and skills that can be developed through the

implementation of shared reading. Select from the materials provided and plan a lesson based on a guided approach. https://www.google.com.au Four Roles of the Reader Brainstorm ways that the lessons/activities you planned related to the four roles of the reader. Code Breaker Meaning maker Text user Text critic/analyst

https://www.google.com.au Independent Reading What is it? Why do it in the classroom? When is it done? How is it done? What is reading stamina? https://www.google.com.au Developing Reading Skills Matching students to text, including levelled text. (Not too hard, not too easy, but just right.)

Running records: What are they and how and why do early years teacher use them? https://www.google.com.au Independent reading, identifying good fit books. Book responses, varying types of response including literal comprehension, open ended and personal responses and implementation of thinking skills. https://www.google.com.au

The readings and discussions over that last few weeks have tended to focus on the strategies that teachers use to develop reading competency. The importance of also developing an appreciation of books and reading should not be lost in the quest for developing skills. Think about how the lessons you planned would engage students. Are there any modifications you could/would make to engage students even more? Use a mind map to explore ways that teachers can develop a classroom that supports reading for pleasure. Effective Writers In groups discuss effective writers. What skills and strategies do they use? Compare these to the skills and strategies

that that effective readers use. Discuss and list teaching approaches that support early writers. How do they engage and motivate young learners? How do they develop essential skills and strategies? Reflections Questions Concerns

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