Chapter 1 : Introduction

Chapter 1 : Introduction

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Contents: 1. Physical consideration, governing equation 2. Analysis of vertical, horizontal & inclined plates 3. Analysis of cylinder, sphere & enclosures 1 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection What is buoyancy force ?

The upward force exerted by a fluid on a body completely or partially immersed in it in a gravitational field. The magnitude of the buoyancy force is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. 2

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection 3 Thermal expansion coefficient / Volume expansion coefficient: Variation of the density of a fluid with temperature at constant pressure. Ideal gas The coefficient of volume expansion is a

measure of the change in volume of a substance with temperature at constant pressure. The larger the temperature difference between the fluid adjacent to a hot (or cold) surface and the fluid away from it, the larger the buoyancy force and the stronger the natural convection currents, and thus the higher the heat transfer rate.

4 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection - Ratio of buoyancy forces and thermal and momentum diffusivities. 5 Rayleigh Number, Ra=Gr.Pr In fluid mechanics, the Rayleigh number for a fluid is a dimensionless number associated with buoyancy driven flow

(also known as free convection or natural convection). When the Rayleigh number is below the critical value for that fluid, heat transfer is primarily in the form of conduction; when it exceeds the critical value, heat transfer is primarily in the form of convection. The Rayleigh number is defined as the product of the Grashof number, which describes the relationship between buoyancy and viscosity within a fluid, and the Prandtl number, which describes the relationship between momentum diffusivity and thermal diffusivity.

Hence the Rayleigh number itself may also be viewed as the ratio of buoyancy and viscosity forces times the ratio of momentum and thermal diffusivities. 6 Forced vs Natural Convection When analyzing potentially mixed convection, a parameter called the Archimedes number(Ar) parametrizes the relative strength of free and forced convection.

The Archimedes number is the ratio of Grashof number and the square of Reynolds number, which represents the ratio of buoyancy force and inertia force, and which stands in for the contribution of natural convection. When Ar >> 1, natural convection dominates and when Ar << 1, forced convection dominates. 7 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Natural convection over surfaces

1) *C & n is depend on the geometry of the surface and flow regime. n=1/4 laminar flow n-=1/3 turbulent flow 2) 1. What is the difference between ReL and RaL ? 2. What is the transition range in a free convection boundary ?

(Laminar) (Turbulent) 3) *All the properties are evaluated at the film temperature, T f=(Ts+T)/2 8 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Transition in a free convection layer depends on the relative

magnitude of the buoyancy and viscous forces *The smooth and parallel lines in (a) indicate that the flow is laminar, whereas the eddies and irregularities in (b) indicate that the flow is turbulent. 9 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection General correlations for vertical plate Eq. (9.24) where,

Laminar 104 RaL 109 C = 0.59 n = 1/4 Turbulent 109 RaL 1013

C = 0.10 n = 1/3 For wide range and more accurate solution, use correlation Churchill and Chu Eq. (9.26) Eq. (9.27) 10

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection For case of vertical cylinders, the previous Eqs. ( 9.24 to 9.27) are valid if the condition satisfied where For case of inclined plates In the case of a hot plate in a cooler environment, convection currents are weaker on the lower surface of the hot plate, and the rate of heat transfer is lower relative to the vertical plate case. On the upper surface of a hot plate, the thickness

of the boundary layer and thus the resistance to heat transfer decreases, and the rate of heat transfer increases relative to the vertical orientation. In the case of a cold plate in a warmer environment, the opposite occurs. cold plate-hot env. Hot plate-cold env. 11

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection at the top and bottom surfaces of cooled and heated inclined plates, respectively, it is recommended that Use equation 9.26 but replace g g cos and only valid for 0 60 12

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Example: Consider a 0.6m x 0.6m thin square plate in a room at 30C. One side of the plate is maintained at a temperature of 90C, while the other side is insulated. Determine the rate of heat transfer from the plate by natural convection if the plate is vertical. 13 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection

14 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection 15 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Example: Consider a 0.6m x 0.6m thin square plate in a room at 30C. One side of the plate is maintained at a temperature of 90C, while the other side is insulated. Determine the rate

of heat transfer from the plate by natural convection if the plate is i) Vertical ii) Horizontal with hot surface facing up iii) Horizontal with hot surface facing down Which position has the lowest heat transfer rate ? Why ? 16 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection The boundary layer over a hot horizontal cylinder starts to develop at the bottom,

increasing in thickness along the circumference, and forming a rising plume at the top. Therefore, the local Nusselt number is highest at the bottom, and lowest at the top of the cylinder when the boundary layer flow remains laminar. The opposite is true in the case of a cold horizontal cylinder in a warmer medium, and the boundary layer in this case starts to develop at the top of the cylinder and ending with a descending plume at the bottom. 17 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection General correlations for an isothermal cylinder

Eq. (9.33) where, For wide range of Ra, use correlation Churchill and Chu Eq. (9.34) 18 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Spheres

In case of isothermal sphere, general correlations is proposed by Churchill Eq. (9.35) * Recommended when Pr 0.7 and RaD 1011 In the limit as RaD 0, Equation 9.35 reduces to NuD = 2, which corresponds to heat transfer by conduction between a spherical surface and a stationary infinite medium, as in Eqs. (7.48 & 7.49) external convection for spherical object. 19

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Problem 9.54: A horizontal uninsulated steam pipe passes through a large room whose walls and ambient air are at 300K. The pipe of 150 mm diameter has an emissivity of 0.85 and an outer surface temperature of 400K. Calculate the heat loss per unit length from the pipe. 1. Schematic 2. Assumptions 3. Fluid properties 4. Analysis of total heat loss per unit length, q/L or q

- Calculate RaD - Calculate NuD - Calculate hD - finally, calculate total heat loss, q *If use Eq. 9.33, hD = 6.15 W/m2K *If use Eq. 9.34, hD = 6.38 W/m2K Within 4%

20 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Enclosures are frequently encountered in practice, and heat transfer through them is of practical interest. Characteristic length Lc: the distance between the hot and cold surfaces. T1 and T2: the temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces. Fluid properties at 24

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection - Flow is characterised by RaD value 25 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Nu = 1 26

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Selection will be determined by the value of RaL, Pr and aspect ratio H/L: 27 Chapter 8 : Natural Convection For larger aspect ratios, the following correlations have been proposed: 28

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection Example: The vertical 0.8m high, 2m wide double pane window consists of two sheet of glass separated by a 2 cm air gap at atmospheric pressure. If the glass surface temperatures across the air gap are measured to be 12C and 2C, determine the rate of heat transfer through the window. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Schematic Assumptions Fluid properties at Tavg Analysis of heat transfer - Calculate RaD - Calculate NuD - Calculate h - finally, calculate heat transfer 29

Chapter 8 : Natural Convection FC forced convection NC natural convection 30

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Science - Year 3/4B Spring 2 Plants Greatly

    Science - Year 3/4B Spring 2 Plants Greatly

    The competition will be to see which village can grow the biggest, tallest, heaviest and healthiest food and flowers. This is where we are going to need your help! We have heard that you are amazing at science so we...
  • Jose Strauss Visiting Professorship Award

    Jose Strauss Visiting Professorship Award

    The Jose Strauss Visiting Professorship Award Instituted in 2007 in honor to the Seminar Founder: Jose Strauss M.D. Is given every year for the past 9 years Recognizes a pediatric nephrologist for its academic achievements, role model for younger generations...
  • Glutamine

    Glutamine

    Massive/prolonged injury . Muscle production of adequate glutamine (endogenous) cannot be sustained. ... so that the administered glutamine serves as precursor in various biosynthetic pathways rather than simply as a fuel. Glutamine in wound healing.
  • Arithmagons - Maiden Beech

    Arithmagons - Maiden Beech

    Arithmagons - an introduction. An arithmagon is a shape with numbers and a rule attached to it. What are the rules? Aim. Our aim is to investigate arithmagon solutions. We will look for patterns and relationships in the numbers. This...
  • IP Installs So what have we learned? Nov

    IP Installs So what have we learned? Nov

    Initial meeting with arena TV was held around the time of IBC 2015. ... So, the TICO stream is used for the Production Switcher, it can go to the Tailboard whilst your 1080p monitoring stream can be sent around the...
  • Flight Patterns by Mary Erickson, Ph.D. Theres something

    Flight Patterns by Mary Erickson, Ph.D. Theres something

    . . . and in the varied regions around the state of Arizona. Which of these Arizona birds have you seen? Which can you name? Why do you think some birds live in some environments, and not in others? What...
  • Diapositive 1 - frop.fr

    Diapositive 1 - frop.fr

    I/ Les sens de la vie! II/Quels nutriments pour se construire III/ Le microbiote IV/ Les premiers pas vers l'autonomie immunitaire V/ Structure - fonction- environnement
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson: &quot;Nature&quot; and &quot;Self-Reliance&quot;

    Ralph Waldo Emerson: "Nature" and "Self-Reliance"

    Ralph Waldo Emerson: "Nature" and "Self-Reliance" God is always near He reveals Himself everywhere and at all times in nature. In His presence we feel real delight in spite of sorrow.