Transcription

1/21/2021Jan. 21, 2021ISDH-LTC COVID-19 UpdatePresented by:Dr. Dan Rusyniak, Chief Medical OfficerMatt Foster, Assistant Commissioner & Special CounselDr. Lindsay Weaver, Chief Medical OfficerJennifer Spivey, Program Manager Infection PreventionIndiana State Department of Health1Today’s Topics Clinical Nurse Observers reports Brenda Buroker LTC Response team update Jennifer Spivey Q&A – IDHThe Breaking Point: Taking Control of Your Stress & Chaos, a webinar (free for IHCAMembers) on January 26, RSVP required HEREIMDA COVID‐19 Update: Vaccine & Treatment Options, a free virtual event onFebruary 4, details HERE21

1/21/2021Contact Information Matt Foster [email protected] 317‐233‐7289 Jennifer Spivey [email protected] 317‐232‐0639 317‐471‐7844 cell Dr. Lindsay Weaver [email protected] Paul Krievins [email protected] Kelly White [email protected] David McCormick [email protected] Dr. Dan Rusyniak [email protected] Russell Evans [email protected] Dr. Kathleen Unroe [email protected] Jan Kulik [email protected] 317‐233‐7480 Peter Krombach [email protected] Michelle Donner [email protected] YOU!MAY 22, 2019IHCA.ORG42

1/20/2021COVID-19 VACCINEINFORMATION FORHEALTHCARE PROVIDERSEpidemiology Resource Center- Created 1/12/21Jennifer Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC , FAPICProgram Manager Infection PreventionEpidemiology Resource [email protected] COVID-19 is the disease caused by the coronavirus called SARSCoV-2. Those infected can be asymptomatic or experience a wide rangeof symptoms from mild to severe, with some cases being fatal. Most commonly causes respiratory symptoms but has beenlinked to issues in other body systems such as the cardiac andnervous systems. Spreads person to person through respiratory droplets, but alsocan be picked up from touching contaminated surfaces. First confirmed case of COVID-19 occurred in the US in January2020, First case in Indiana was confirmed in March 2020.221

1/20/2021LTC Facilities in Indiana33Indiana Long-term Care Facilities & COVID-19Data obtained from IDOH COVID-19 Dashboard on 1/12/2021442

1/20/2021The current vaccinesPfizer-BioNTechModernaType of vaccine: mRNAType of vaccine: mRNANumber of shots: 2 shots, 21 days apartNumber of shots: 2 shots, 28 days apartWho Can Get It: Anyone 16 years or olderWho Can Get It: Anyone 18 years or olderHow given: Shot in the muscle of the upper armHow given: Shot in the muscle of the upper armEfficacy after both doses: 95%Efficacy after both doses: 94.1%Does not contain:Does not contain: Eggs Eggs Preservatives Preservatives Latex LatexFull ingredients list can be found here:Full Ingredients list can be found s://www.fda.gov/media/144638/download55How did these vaccines getproduced so quickly?663

1/20/2021Vaccine safetyALL the COVID-19 vaccinesthat are being used have gonethrough the same safety testsas other vaccines producedand meet the same standardsthat ensure safety andefficacy!7Operation Warp SpeedOperation Warp Speed (OWS) from the U.S. Department of Defenseaccelerated the process in multiple ways: Worldwide interest led to increased funding and staffing Rapid whole-genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 early in the pandemic Utilizing pre-existing vaccine knowledge (mRNA vaccines have been studied forover 30 years) Large scale manufacturing of the most promising vaccines during Phase III ofstudies, to ensure timely distribution after approval by the FDA Began planning distribution and infrastructure techniques from the beginning Large scale Phase III studies that included 30,000 participants, allowing forcopious data on diverse patients Studies provided continuous safety and efficacy data to the FDA FDA looked at the studies immediately upon filing for EUA approval, instead ofthe normal 10 to 12-month processing wait period.884

1/20/2021Vaccine Life Cycle: Safety at Every Phase99Will I develop COVID-19after getting the vaccine?105

1/20/2021NO The full pathogen is not injected into yourbody. The vaccine gives your body the mRNA ofa SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein. Your body then creates that protein,causing your body to have an immuneresponse. The mRNA that was injected quickly getsdestroyed after the spike protein iscreated. That immune response and subsequentproduction of antibodies is what protectsus from getting infected if the real virusenters our bodies.1111Anaphylactic reactions21 cases of anaphylaxis occurred during 1,893,360(0.0011%) first doses of Pfizer administration 17 of the 21 occurred in individuals that have experiencedanaphylaxis before Majority happened within the first 15 mins of administration No deathsFacilities have been instructed to have epi pens on site incase of severe reactions and all recipients are monitored forthe first 15 minutes after administration of the vaccine.12126

1/20/20211313Can getting the vaccine cause meto test positive for COVID-19?14147

1/20/2021The full pathogen is not injected into your body.Instead, the mRNA for a spike protein from thevirus is used to create an immune response.NOSince the pathogen is not injected, the vaccinewill not cause you to test positive for the virusIMPORTANT TO NOTE– if you were infected withthe virus shortly before receiving the vaccines orshortly after, the vaccine will not prevent youfrom developing the disease. It can take up totwo weeks for the immune response to takeeffect. You could test positive, if you’ve caughtthe illness before immunity develops.15VaccineSideEffects vs.COVID-19SideEffectsNormal vaccine side effects are to be expected and indicatean immune response! These side effects should not lastlonger than 24-48 hours: Mild fever Sore Arm Headache FatigueIf you develop symptoms aligned with COVID-19, you shouldnot assume these are vaccine side effects and should betested for COVID-19: Cough Shortness of breath Loss of taste or smell Diarrhea Nasal congestion High fevers or mild fevers lasting longer than 48 hours16168

1/20/2021The full protection from thevaccine may take up to two weeksafter the second dose.1717You will still need totake precautions!Socially distanceMask upAvoid crowdsStay home if you are sickHand hygiene18189

1/20/2021Will the vaccine change my DNA?1919COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interactwith your DNA in any way.NOMessenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNAvaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorizedfor use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach ourcells how to make a protein that triggers an immuneresponse.The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters thenucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. Thismeans the mRNA cannot affect or interact with ourDNA in any way.2010

1/20/2021Does the vaccine containa microchip to track me?2121NOThe vaccine will not inject you with amicrochip.The only “microchip” potentially involved inthe vaccination process is similar to abarcode on the syringe itself, used to scanthe dose to check for expiration date andother manufacturer information. This helpskeep track of doses given. No patientinformation is collected from this microchipand it is NOT injected into your skin.222211

1/20/2021I’ve already had COVID-19.Should I get the vaccine?2323YES2412

1/20/2021Should I be concerned aboutlong-term side effects?2525No one has had the vaccine in their body longer than 9 months (as of January 2021),so while we cannot say with 100% certainty there are no long-term effects, thehistory of vaccines suggests long-term effects are unlikely.In the past, long-term effects of vaccines were rarely noted beyond 6 weeks. Inresponse to this fact, the FDA requires all Emergency Use Application (EUA)applicants to wait until 60 days after giving at least 50% of their study participantsthe last dose of the vaccine. This allows the researchers to monitor for these potentiallonger-term side effects and ensure safety.Over 30,000 participants received both vaccine doses and have not had significantside effects. Thousands of people are getting vaccinated daily across the world andworld health organizations are closely tracking short term and long-term effects.262613

1/20/2021COVID-19 Has Known Long-Term EffectsThe worst-case scenario from COVID-19 is obviously death, however, there are numerous shortterm and long-term effects associated with the disease: Fatigue Shortness of breath Join and muscle pain Rash and hair loss Concentration and memory problems Blood clots Organ Damage: Brain, Lungs, and HeartAs of January 2021, Over 22 million Americans have had COVID-19 and over 380,000 people havedied from the disease in the US alone. Nearly 2 million people have died worldwide.2727Why should I get the vaccine?282814

1/20/2021 Healthcare personnel are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 Vaccinating healthcare personnel protects healthcare capacity Vaccinating healthcare personnel helps prevent patients from gettingCOVID-19 Benefits of vaccination believed to outweigh possible risks Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases and early datafrom clinical trials, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine mayalso help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. The vaccine is FREE. Vaccinating Long-term care staff and residents WILL save lives!2929The Elderly Are atGreater Risk!LTC residents made-upover 48%of all Indiana COVID-19deaths, as of Jan 2021.When you protect yourself,you protect yourresidents!Data obtained from IDOH COVID-19 Dashboardon 1/12/2021303015

1/20/2021COVID-19 can have serious, lifethreatening complications, andthere is no way to know howCOVID-19 will affect you. And ifyou get sick, you could spreadthe disease to friends, family,your patients, and othersaround you.3131Thank you!Epidemiology Resource CenterJennifer Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC , FAPICProgram Manager Infection PreventionEpidemiology Resource [email protected]

1/20/2021References and Resources1. https://www.coronavirus.in.gov/2. uct/pfizer/index.html3. uct/moderna/index.html4. 1/-1/0/200813-D-ZZ999-100.JPG5. istory/index.html6. facts.html?CDC AA refVal ference and Resources cont’d1. /recommendations/hcp.html2. . 5. -20490351343417

COVID-19 VACCINEINFORMATION FORHEALTHCARE PROVIDERSEpidemiology Resource Center- Created 1/12/21Jennifer Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC , FAPICProgram Manager Infection PreventionEpidemiology Resource [email protected]

COVID-19 COVID-19 is the disease caused by the coronavirus called SARSCoV-2. Those infected can be asymptomatic or experience a wide rangeof symptoms from mild to severe, with some cases being fatal. Most commonly causes respiratory symptoms but has beenlinked to issues in other body systems such as the cardiac andnervous systems. Spreads person to person through respiratory droplets, but alsocan be picked up from touching contaminated surfaces. First confirmed case of COVID-19 occurred in the US in January2020, First case in Indiana was confirmed in March 2020.2

LTC Facilities in Indiana3

Indiana Long-term Care Facilities & COVID-19Data obtained from IDOH COVID-19 Dashboard on 1/12/20214

The current vaccinesPfizer-BioNTechModernaType of vaccine: mRNAType of vaccine: mRNANumber of shots: 2 shots, 21 days apartNumber of shots: 2 shots, 28 days apartWho Can Get It: Anyone 16 years or olderWho Can Get It: Anyone 18 years or olderHow given: Shot in the muscle of the upper armHow given: Shot in the muscle of the upper armEfficacy after both doses: 95%Efficacy after both doses: 94.1%Does not contain:Does not contain: Eggs Eggs Preservatives Preservatives Latex LatexFull ingredients list can be found here:Full Ingredients list can be found s://www.fda.gov/media/144638/download5

How did these vaccines getproduced so quickly?6

Vaccine safetyALL the COVID-19 vaccinesthat are being used havegone through the same safetytests as other vaccinesproduced and meet the samestandards that ensure safetyand efficacy!

Operation Warp SpeedOperation Warp Speed (OWS) from the U.S. Department of Defenseaccelerated the process in multiple ways: Worldwide interest led to increased funding and staffing Rapid whole-genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 early in the pandemic Utilizing pre-existing vaccine knowledge (mRNA vaccines have been studiedfor over 30 years) Large scale manufacturing of the most promising vaccines during Phase III ofstudies, to ensure timely distribution after approval by the FDA Began planning distribution and infrastructure techniques from the beginning Large scale Phase III studies that included 30,000 participants, allowing forcopious data on diverse patients Studies provided continuous safety and efficacy data to the FDA FDA looked at the studies immediately upon filing for EUA approval, insteadof the normal 10 to 12-month processing wait period.8

Vaccine Life Cycle: Safety at Every Phase9

Will I develop COVID-19after getting the vaccine?

NO The full pathogen is not injected into yourbody. The vaccine gives your body the mRNA ofa SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein. Your body then creates that protein,causing your body to have an immuneresponse. The mRNA that was injected quickly getsdestroyed after the spike protein iscreated. That immune response and subsequentproduction of antibodies is what protectsus from getting infected if the real virusenters our bodies.11

Anaphylactic reactions21 cases of anaphylaxis occurred during 1,893,360(0.0011%) first doses of Pfizer administration 17 of the 21 occurred in individuals that have experiencedanaphylaxis before Majority happened within the first 15 mins of administration No deathsFacilities have been instructed to have epi pens on site incase of severe reactions and all recipients are monitored forthe first 15 minutes after administration of the vaccine.12

13

Can getting the vaccine cause meto test positive for COVID-19?14

The full pathogen is not injected into your body.Instead, the mRNA for a spike protein from thevirus is used to create an immune response.NOSince the pathogen is not injected, the vaccinewill not cause you to test positive for the virusIMPORTANT TO NOTE– if you were infected withthe virus shortly before receiving the vaccines orshortly after, the vaccine will not prevent youfrom developing the disease. It can take up totwo weeks for the immune response to takeeffect. You could test positive, if you’ve caughtthe illness before immunity develops.

VaccineSideEffects vs.COVID-19SideEffects16Normal vaccine side effects are to be expected and indicatean immune response! These side effects should not lastlonger than 24-48 hours: Mild fever Sore Arm Headache FatigueIf you develop symptoms aligned with COVID-19, you shouldnot assume these are vaccine side effects and should betested for COVID-19: Cough Shortness of breath Loss of taste or smell Diarrhea Nasal congestion High fevers or mild fevers lasting longer than 48 hours

The full protection from thevaccine may take up to twoweeks after the second dose.17

You will still needto take precautions!Socially distanceMask upAvoid crowdsStay home if you are sickHand hygiene18

Will the vaccine change my DNA?19

COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interactwith your DNA in any way.NOMessenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNAvaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorizedfor use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach ourcells how to make a protein that triggers an immuneresponse.The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters thenucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. Thismeans the mRNA cannot affect or interact with ourDNA in any way.

Does the vaccine containa microchip to track me?21

NOThe vaccine will not inject you with amicrochip.The only “microchip” potentially involved inthe vaccination process is similar to abarcode on the syringe itself, used to scanthe dose to check for expiration date andother manufacturer information. This helpskeep track of doses given. No patientinformation is collected from this microchipand it is NOT injected into your skin.22

I’ve already had COVID-19.Should I get the vaccine?23

YES

Should I be concerned aboutlong-term side effects?25

No one has had the vaccine in their body longer than 9 months (as of January 2021),so while we cannot say with 100% certainty there are no long-term effects, thehistory of vaccines suggests long-term effects are unlikely.In the past, long-term effects of vaccines were rarely noted beyond 6 weeks. Inresponse to this fact, the FDA requires all Emergency Use Application (EUA)applicants to wait until 60 days after giving at least 50% of their study participantsthe last dose of the vaccine. This allows the researchers to monitor for these potentiallonger-term side effects and ensure safety.Over 30,000 participants received both vaccine doses and have not had significantside effects. Thousands of people are getting vaccinated daily across the world andworld health organizations are closely tracking short term and long-term effects.26

COVID-19 Has Known Long-Term EffectsThe worst-case scenario from COVID-19 is obviously death, however, there are numerousshort-term and long-term effects associated with the disease: Fatigue Shortness of breath Join and muscle pain Rash and hair loss Concentration and memory problems Blood clots Organ Damage: Brain, Lungs, and HeartAs of January 2021, Over 22 million Americans have had COVID-19 and over 380,000 peoplehave died from the disease in the US alone. Nearly 2 million people have died worldwide.27

Why should I get the vaccine?28

Healthcare personnel are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 Vaccinating healthcare personnel protects healthcare capacity Vaccinating healthcare personnel helps prevent patients from gettingCOVID-19 Benefits of vaccination believed to outweigh possible risks Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases and early datafrom clinical trials, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine mayalso help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. The vaccine is FREE. Vaccinating Long-term care staff and residents WILL save lives!29

The Elderly Are atGreater Risk!LTC residents made-upover 48%of all Indiana COVID-19deaths, as of Jan 2021.When you protect yourself,you protect yourresidents!Data obtained from IDOH COVID-19 Dashboardon 1/12/202130

COVID-19 can have serious, lifethreatening complications, andthere is no way to know howCOVID-19 will affect you. And ifyou get sick, you could spreadthe disease to friends, family,your patients, and othersaround you.31

Thank you!Epidemiology Resource CenterJennifer Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC , FAPICProgram Manager Infection PreventionEpidemiology Resource [email protected]

References and Resources1. https://www.coronavirus.in.gov/2. uct/pfizer/index.html3. uct/moderna