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Other Titles from the SeriesModern Greek Culture Mikis Theodorakis.Finding Greece in his music* Cretan Music. UnravelingAriadne’s thread*Coffee Table Books Greece, Star & Secret Islands(bilingual, hardcover) 2nd edition Magical Greece(bilingual, hardcover) 2nd edition Mikis Theodorakis.My posters (bilingual) Mikis Theodorakis. My posters(bilingual, collector’s edition,hardcover)Narratives The story of Minos Zombanakis.Banking Without Borders Diplomats & Doormats.An Hotelier’s Odyssey Chronicle of a life in shippingFiction A Likely Impossibility*Business History The Business of Olympic GamesSponsorship Following the Nereids: Sea routesand maritime business* also available as pwww.youtube.com/economiagrMarika MitsotakiRecipes of loveMarika Mitsotaki, wife, mother andcook extraordinaire, serves up a lifetimeof memories: about her mother andmentor in things culinary; about the serious blow to her health when as a childshe was struck by polio; about her meeting Kostas Mitsotakis, their courtship,marriage and the arrival of their fourchildren; about the difficult years of thedictatorship in Greece, the family’s selfexile to Paris and their eventual returnto the parental house in Crete. Moreover, the turbulent as well as exciting mosaic of her life as spouse of one of thecountry’s longest-serving statesmen isdirectly connected to important eventsof Greece’s recent history.But there is more. As food, eating andfamily lunches and dinners are a constantpoint of reference for the Mitsotakisfamily –as well as any family– this uniquebook fittingly offers another taste of history: the traditional recipes of “kyria Marika”. Yours to try and enjoy not only aspart of authentic Greek culture, but alsoas the perfect –not to mention delicious–excuse that gathered the Mitsotakis family around the table and kept it united.

MARIKA MITSOTAKIRecipes of loveForeword:ALEXANDRA MITSOTAKIText:EMMANUELA NIKOLAIDOURecipes edited by:KATERINA MITSOTAKITranslated by:MARIA ADAMANTIDIS COUTROUBAKIATHENS 2012

Marika Mitsotaki, Alexandra Mitsotaki, Katerina MitsotakiOriginal title in Greek: Μαρίκα Μητσοτάκη: Συνταγές με ιστορίαPublished by the LIVANI PUBLISHING ORGANIZATION S.A., 2011ISBN: 978-960-9490-18-4 Kerkyra Publications SA – Economia Publishing1st English edition, November 2012Series: Modern Greek CultureAuthor: MARIKA MITSOTAKIText: EMMANUELA NIKOLAIDOURecipes edited by: KATERINA MITSOTAKITranslated by: MARIA ADAMANTIDIS COUTROUBAKIFood photographer: MICHAEL KOUVIDISFamily photographs: V ASSILIKI GEORGIOU – FOCUS ART,GIORGOS PAPADAKIS – PAPADAKISPRESS,PERSONAL ARCHIVE (UNPUBLISHED MATERIAL),ARCHIVE OF THE MITSOTAKIS FOUNDATIONBackcover photograph: STUDIO PATRIDISProduction: Kerkyra Publications – Economia PublishingPublication Coordinator: Efi AndrikopoulouLayout: Makis Christopoulos, Atelier KerkyraDistributionKERKYRA Publications S.A.6-8 Vlahava street, 105 51 Athens-GreeceTel.: 0030-210-3314.714, Fax: 0030-210-3252.283www.economia.gr, [email protected] rights reserved. No part of this book may be reprinted or reproduced,stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means,electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recordingor otherwise, whether in its original form or in a translated or adapted version,without the publisher’s prior written permission.

ContentsForeword by Alexandra Mitsotaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9Around the table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11Grandmother Nonika’s kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Adversity and courage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Love, Crete and the magnificent red snapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22From the “Galaria” in Crete to Glyfada in Athens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29Hard times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34Sailing to salvation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39Reunited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42In Paris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44The house in Crete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50Snapshots and memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71Thank you, Grandma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75Recipes – Savory dishesMoussaka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78Biftekakia (Ground meat patties) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81Pastitsio with phyllo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82Taramosalata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84Soutzoukakia (Meatballs in tomato sauce) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86Roast pork with potatoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88Villeroy with spinach purée . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90Braised veal with aubergine purée (HünkarHünkar BegendiBegendi) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93Fresh beans with shrimps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94Keftedes (Meatballs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96Potato purée. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98Stuffed tomatoes with béchamel tops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100Roast beef with pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102Youvetsi (Braised meat and orzo casserole) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104Stuffed courgettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106Dolmadakia (Stuffed vine leaves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108Meat loaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1107

Chicken with rice and Milanaise sauce (Poulet au riz) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112Parmesan biscuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114Kaltsounia with cheese (Cheese-filled dumplings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116Hortokaltsouna (Spinach-filled dumplings). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118Fried cod with skordalia garlic spread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120Boiled fish with soup, mayonnaise and Athenian salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122Stifado (Rabbit and onion casserole) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125Stuffed turkey with potatoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126Mageiritsa soup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129Lemon-scented pot roast with potato chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130Sole, shrimp and spinach casserole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132Pasta with shrimps and leeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134Crêpes with salmon filling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136Chicken with okra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138Notes & tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139Recipes – SweetsBabas au rhum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14210 minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144Sponge cake log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146Vassilopita (New Year’s cake) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148Moustokouloura (Grape must cookies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150Pasta Flora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152Choux à la crème. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154Kourambiedes (Butter cookies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156Custard-in-a-plate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158Galaktoboureko (Custard and phyllo pie) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159Grandmother Nonika’s marble cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160Birthday cake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162Pêches melba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1648

ForewordThis book is a gift –a gift I wanted to make to my mother. When the Greek versioncame out on November 29, 2011, the day of her 81st birthday, she was deeplymoved and profoundly happy. She had had a difficult year spending months inhospital and rehabilitation. The “book of her recipes”, which in the end was tobecome also the book of her life, was actually designed to help her over thoselong months. Help her to regain her spirit, her joie-de-vivre and the strength towage yet another battle for her health. It provided her with something to lookforward to. Working on it allowed her to talk about food, to pick recipes, to tasteand to think about cooking even when she could not stand in her kitchen anymore. Just as importantly, it helped her reminisce and unfold memories of herchildhood years, of her love for our father, of the joys and sorrows of family life.As a mother of four, a grandmother of thirteen and a great-grandmother of five,she had had plenty.That autumn day in Athens, when the book was publicly launched, was her day.She was acknowledged and recognized not as the wife of my father –a prominentpolitician– but in her own right. That day she was the center of everybody’s attention, admiration and love. She deserved it and I am glad my sister Katerina –whoworked on the recipes– and I speeded up the process of finishing the book because, as it turned out, it was to be her last public appearance. She left us a fewmonths later.Her life certainly informed her cooking: there was pre-war Athens, my grandmother’s recipes and the support, as it were, of American technology –meaningthe refrigerator and the blender– which she discovered before they became staples of every Greek household; there was the influence of French cuisine duringthe years of political exile in Paris; and finally, the flavors of Greece and most specially of Crete, her adopted home.In our family, as in most Greek families, food plays a central role. In fact, thereare two things we consistently do at home when we are all together: we eat andwe talk! And strangely enough, even while eating, we talk about food. Food is,in the end, a strong social link: When we are all together, somebody is bound toask what we are having for dinner. For my mother, the long distance call –almosta daily habit– would inevitably include the question “What’s on the menu today?”, whereas her welcome from a night out would conclude with, “And howwas the food?”, just as the return from a long trip abroad was always met with“Did you eat well there, my dear?”. But the most important question of all, which9

made us all feel loved and welcome, remained: “What do you want me to cookfor you today?”.Actually the Greek language reflects that reality. In Greek the word for companionship –“syntrofikotita”– combines the prefix “syn”, which implies togetherness, with “trofi”: “food”.All of us, children and grandchildren, had been asking my mother for years tomake this book of family recipes. She agreed but, as it happened, there were always more pressing matters that required her attention. Life has a way of imposing its own rhythm and never allowed her enough free time to turn her attentionto this book. Perhaps because, in the end, she was not really interested; for mymother, cooking and eating were part of her daily routine with my father, with us,with her friends –and how do you turn all this into a book? Perhaps she also feltshe needed to save her energy and time –both no longer in abundance– in orderto cope with real life, which had not always been easy for her.So, in the end, “the book” became a gift, a gift my sister Katerina and I madeto her. But now, as so often happens in life with giving, we have come to realizethat this is also a gift we made to ourselves, our children and grandchildren andto the people who have known and loved her. It will keep her recipes alive, notonly those related to food and eating but also the one on how to keep a familyclose together –a recipe for love and fulfillment. And if any proof is needed, oneneed only glance at the photograph on the back cover of this book, where shelooks so astonishingly beautiful and happy.That is how we choose to remember her.Alexandra MitsotakiNovember 201210

Grandmother Nonika’s kitchenMarika Yannoukou, subsequently Mitsotaki, was born inthe inter-war period to oneof the most privileged Athenian families, who –as later events were to prove–was fortunate enough not to have other children. Her maternal grandfatherwas the well-known industrialist andformidable entrepreneur Zavoyannis.Also involved in politics as a member ofparliament for the party that supportedEleftherios Venizelos –the charismatic Marika Yannoukou,subsequentlyMitsotaki, withher father –a truegentleman, bycommon agreement.statesman and builder of modernGreece in the early 20th century– hergrandfather represented the district ofPiraeus from which he hailed.When it was time to marry, he chosea sweet and –by all accounts– beautifulyoung woman from the island of Hydrato be his bride. In her fervor to presenthim with the much-needed son, shegave birth to twelve girls, of which onlyfour survived into maturity. In the end,following subsequent losses, of thislarge family and its descendants onlyone daughter, Marika, was left. As theonly remaining child, she was dotedupon by her parents and all family relatives and especially her mother’s sisters.Marika Mitsotaki becomes emotionalwhen speaking of her parents.“They were extraordinary people. Myfather was a true bon vivant, a remarkable man! My mother, Dora, was a terrific homemaker, always making surethat everything was in perfect order Iremember, for instance, that she insisted that I use the pink clothes hanger formy pink dress, the blue one for the bluedress and so on. She was also a fantastic cook and I made a point of watchingher in action –I loved to see how shecombined ingredients to come up withwonderful flavors But I also observedwhat my parents ordered when we travelled, I wanted to know and try new13

The young loversare all smiles in thesesnapshots taken on therare trips away fromKostas Mitsotakis’hectic schedule as apolitician on the rise.was my mother-in-law’s cooking. Soone day, I walk up to her and brazenlyexclaim:”‘Mother, I need to tell you something: your cooking is terrible! You donot use butter or condiments, you donot use mustard or pepper ’”The only things that she made quitewell were the ‘kaltsounia’. I had decidedto be very direct about how difficult itwas for me to accept her cooking, because I wanted us to have a sincere andhonest relationship. So, after hearingmy complaint, though she was a ratherreserved and undemonstrative woman,she waves towards the kitchen and tellsme with a great deal of humor:”‘In you go, then, milady!’”So it was that I started preparingmy own dishes and let the others cooktheir tasteless mush!”“Our parental home in Crete,” explains Kostas Mitsotakis, “was a bighouse with a wonderful garden but itwas old, older than Eleftherios Venizelos’ house. My father bought it in 1920and restored it from the foundationsup. We used to call it ‘Galaria’ and itresembled a military camp as it was always crowded and noisy, teeming withpeople and children. My mother, sisterand brothers and their families –threegenerations– all lived under this oneroof, so there was scarcely any freespace left and naturally it was difficultfor Marika to adapt at first. But thingswent smoothly after a little while. Shehad a problem with the food, yes, but Ishould add that I made her changesome of her habits as well. She learned25

During the family’sself-exile in Paris, thechildren developed acloser relationship withtheir father.”Many years later, when my granddaughter Alexia was studying in Parisand I happened to be in the city, I wasdoing the shopping for meat. I used tobuy really good cuts for the famousFrench pot-au-feu. Often I would alsobuy fish. It is there that I got to knowabout turbot which in Greece we call‘kalkani’ –a species that the Frenchwould not eat in earlier times because itis truly ugly-looking! Marica absolutelyloves all shell-fish, while I love clams.Generally, I prefer classic French cuisine,not the rather pretentious ‘nouvelle cuisine’.”Marika is right when she says thatin Paris I got to really know my children.They went to an excellent German language school in the suburb of SaintCloud. It is with me that they learnedwhat it means to engage in dialogue,something that we Greeks do not knowhow to do well. We lived frugally in asmall house, but you can make a life inParis no matter what your finances are.In my first year there I lived alone. Thankfully, I had a Portuguese housekeeperwho knew how to cook salt cod in fiftydifferent ways!”France expanded our culinary vocabulary. We learned many things thatwe did not know of here in Greece. Marika used to cook regularly and we hadmany loyal customers, as it were! Oneof them was Constantinos Karamanliswho came very often for dinner. It isamazing how he managed to keep hisbody weight constant. I used to put onweight as the years went by, but hedidn’t. When he lived in Paris, he would47

MOUSSAKAIngredients:For the béchamel sauce:2 kg mixed minced meat150 g butter(beef and pork, 1 kg each)1 kg potatoes2 3/ 4 cup (180 ml) oil350 g flour1 kg courgettes2 1/ 2 milk1 kg aubergines400 g parmesan and3/ 2 cups plus a little more (900 ml)1tomato juice2 large onions, finely chopped3 1/ 2 tbsp (50 ml) cognacsalt, pepper/ 4 cup (180 ml) oil3oil for fryingEmmental (Swiss) cheese, grated5 egg yolksgrated nutmegsalt, pepperΤips: The layers do not50 g butter to scatteron the béchamelcheese for sprinklingbread crumbs to sprinkleon the roasting dishPreparation method:Heat the oil in a deep pan, add the onions and let simmer until light golden incolor, stirring from time to time. Addthe minced meat and cook for a fewminutes. Add the cognac, the tomatojuice, salt and pepper and let cook forabout half an hour.Slice the aubergines into rounds andsoak them in salted water for an hour tominimize the bitter flavor, taking care tochange the water 2 or 3 times. Gentlysqueeze