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Florida A&M UniversitySchool of Architecture Engineering TechnologyARC 6373 – 301 (#3019)Urban Design StudioMWF 1:30pM - 5:30PMRoom 360/ Graduate StudioSemester: Fall 2018Credits: 6Associate Professor Andrew Chin,[email protected], 850.339.8168 cellOffice Hours: MWF, 10:00AM - 12:00 NoonWe don’t want a plan based on land uses. We want a plan based on experiences.Who visits downtown to see land uses? Mitchell Silver.

ARC 373 - 601 (#3019)Urban Design StudioCOURSE DESCRIPTIONThe graduate class focuses on the planning and management of urban development projects. Upon the completion of thecourse students will have an introductory understanding of the planning and management processes and proceduresinvolved in urban development projects.COURSE GOALS/ OBJECTIVES Students will have an awareness of contemporary urban design theory. Students will have an understanding of issues related to rural, suburban and urban contexts. Students will have an understanding of urban design terminology. Students will be able to use urban design graphic communication techniques. Students will be able to apply ADA requirements related to site planning issues.TOPICAL OUTLINE Urban Design Theory Urban Design Graphics Urban Design Terminology ADA Site PlanningRECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS READINGS (NOT REQUIRED)A series of course readings and video lectures are posted to the class Google Drive.COURSE REQUIREMENTS EVALUATIONClass ParticipationAndrew Chin10%Project 1Jose Gamez30%Project 2Herman Howard30%Project 3Donald Gray30%GRADING SCALEA is 90-100%B is 80-89%C is 70-79%D is 65-69%F is less than 65%ATTENDANCE POLICY STATEMENTThe class will follow the University attendance policy. Also, if a student is more than 10 minutes late for class, the latearrival is equal to50% of an absence.

ARC 373 - 601 (#3019)Urban Design StudioACADEMIC HONOR POLICY STATEMENTThe Florida A&M University SAET Student handbook states that “the relationship between students and faculty isbased upon trust, and the continued maintenance of this trust is necessary for education to be successful. (1) Studentsneed to trust that faculty has made appropriate judgments as to the content and structure of the course. (2) Facultymembers need to trust that the work turned in by students represents their own effort. Violation of this trust underminesthe educational process. As such, academic dishonesty will be dealt with seriously. Any student found to have copied ahomework assignment, cheated on a quiz or examination or submitted work that was created by another individual willreceive a failing grade (F) for the assignment, and will be referred to the Dean of the School of Architecture Engineering Technology for disciplinary action. Students are cautioned that the disciplinary sanctions for academicdishonesty (imposed in addition to the F grade) can be quite severe.” Additional detail on FAMU Academic HonestyViolations are provided in University Policy 2.012 (10.)(s). If you have any questions, please see your AcademicAdvisor.AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) STATEMENTThe Florida A&M University Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy Statement sates that “Individuals whoneed a reasonable accommodation must notify the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at 599-3076.” It is theresponsibility of the FAMU Equal Opportunity Programs (EOP) Office, through the ADA Coordinator, to ensure theFlorida A&M University is in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you have any questions, pleasecontact your Academic Advisor or the University EOP Officer, Equal Opportunity Programs, 674 Gamble Street,Tallahassee, FL 32307, (850) 599-3076NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY STATEMENTIt is the policy of Florida A&M University to assure that each member of the University community be permitted towork or attend classes in an environment free from any form of discrimination including race, creed, color, age,disability, sex, martial status, national origin, veteran status and sexual harassment as prohibited by State and Federalstatues. This shall include applicants for admission to the University and employment. Questions concerning this policyand procedures for filing complaints under the policy should be directed to: University EOP Officer, Equal OpportunityPrograms, 674 Gamble Street, Tallahassee, FL 32307, (850) 599-3076ACADEMIC LEARNING COMPACTS (ALC)The Florida Board of Governors has articulated the importance of student achievement in its strategic planning andaccountability processes. Therefore, FAMU has developed Academic Learning Compacts (ALC) and related assessmentprocesses to define and demonstrate student achievement in its degree programs. The FAMU SOA Academic LearningCompacts (ALC) are posted online. cLearningCompacts

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)General Description:This phase of your core studio will explore emerging trends in the field of urban design with a focus onthe future of suburban/urban areas that now face increasing pressure to redevelop, to densify and tobecome more sustainable. The first phase of this studio will take on an array of multi-disciplinary topicsaround the subject of “retrofitting” urban areas to meet a 21st century set of social, environmental,physical, and economic needs through several lenses: Infrastructure, People, Ecologies,Typologies, and Technologies. Given the need to imagine a new set of futures for our metropolitanlandscapes, this phase of the studio will set its planning horizon on the year 2050—by which time manyof the impacts of global climate changes and cultural flows will be evident.This will involve a set of exercises culminating in the design of a networked and reinvented suburbanprototypes that respond to a specific urban location in Tallahassee, Fl. The first week of the term will introduce a series of topics and readings that will establish aworking urban design vocabulary for the group.In the second week of the term, we will focus on the analysis and illustration of issuescorresponding to each of the lenses listed above as they relate to the current state ofTallahassee—as well as projections of those same conditions for the year 2050. This willinvolve online team-based presentations and in-person exhibitions/pin ups at FAMU.The third week of the term will focus on site analysis in Tallahassee. This will involve onlineteam-based presentations and in-person exhibitions/pin ups at FAMU.The fourth week of the term will involve an initial design charrette at FAMU. Working in teams,visions for the city’s “(sub)urban future” will be proposed through new urban prototypes thataddress each of the research lenses and each team’s individual speculation regarding thefuture of Tallahassee.The fifth and sixth weeks will focus on design development and delivery of a schematic andprojective new suburban prototype that corresponds to both the group’s collective analysis aswell as each team’s speculative design brief, ideas for growth/phasing, and a new urbanfabric/DNA for the city.Organization:Working in teams, the studio will engage two phases of exploration: Analysis and Speculation.Phase I: Analysis: Understanding the Urban ConditionTeams will select one of the topics listed below to present a general “snap-shot” of the current state ofInfrastructure, People/Demographics, Ecologies/Environment, Urban and Building Types, andTechnologies impacting North American suburbs generally and Tallahassee specifically. This exercise isintended to expose students to both the general issues and trends facing cities today, as well as toground their charrettes and design proposals in quantitative data, analysis, mapping, and documentation.Phase II: Speculation: Looking for a New New UrbanismThe second phase will ask teams to develop a speculative design brief – a vision and provocation for thecity -- as they would in a professional setting. Assuming a multi-disciplinary approach, each team will beresponsible for addressing the analytical resources developed by the class and a specific site within anetwork of urban locations. This charrette and the research from phase I will be the basis for the deliveryof a schematic design proposal by the end of the session. These schematic designs will form the basematerial for an exhibition at FAMU and a report to be assembled by the instructor.New New Urbanism1

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)FALL 2018 FAMU URBAN DESIGN STUDIO: (SUB)URBAN RETROFIT CHARETTE CALENDAR**SUBJECT TO CHANGE***Week 1MonWedAug 27Aug 292:00PMSemester Begins: Independent PrepIntroduction Online: New New Urbanism?Readings: LA Now Volumes 1 & 2 (reference material)Watch:Roger Sherman: Architect as Agenthttps://vimeo.com/51215270David Grahame Shane: Recombinant Urbanism Lecturehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v 1YRqsEPD0HsEllen Dunham Jones: Retrofitting Suburbiahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v R 5tTnsaVA4Teddy Cruz: The Informal As Praxishttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v F0WP2v PPoMJoe Minicozzi: Dollars and Sense of Downtown Developmenthttps://vimeo.com/130384860FriAug 313:00PMSeminar Online: UrbanismsReadings: Michigan Debates On Urbanism SeriesEveryday UrbanismNew UrbanismPost-Urbanism and Re-UrbanismKevin Lynch: Elements of the CityAldo Rossi: The Architecture of the CityWeek 2MonWedSep 3Sep 5FriSep 7Holiday - Labor Day (University Closed)Online Seminar: Phase 1 Lenses and AnalysisReadings: Stan Allen, Points and LineJames Corner, Agency of MappingAlbert Pope, LaddersDavid Grahame Shane, Urban Design Since 1945Jones and Williamson, Retrofitting SuburbiaDNA SamplingWorkdayWeek 3SunMonWedFriSep 9Sep 10Sep 12Sep 14FAMU CharretteFAMU CharretteWorkdayWorkdayPhase 1 Analysis DueBegin Site AnalysisWeek 4SunMonWedFriSep 16Sep 17Sep 19Sep 21FAMU CharretteFAMU CharretteWorkdayWorkdaySite Analysis and DNA Samples DueBegin SpeculationsWeek 5WedFriSep 26Sep 28Charrette Session Online: Conceptual Visions Due/Begin Design DevelopmentWorkdayNew New Urbanism2

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)Week 6MonWedFriSunMonOct 1Oct 3Oct 5Oct 7Oct 8Charrette Session Online: Design DevelopmentWorkdayWorkdayCharrette Drawings and Report DueFinal PresentationNew New Urbanism3

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)Phase 1: Suburban Research LensesFor each lens, teams must cite and showcase the most relevant and pressing issues from a quantitativeand geo-spatial perspective. This will be done through an inventory of nationa/globall trends andstatistics and their impacts upon the local landscape. The analysis must represent a “current snap-shot”,meaning that data should be collected from recent reputable sources (census reports, for example). Thissnap-shot should also compare current conditions to projections for the year 2050.Using the LA Now documents as references, each team will pick one lens to produce:1x Poster1x Map1xSetStatistical info-graphics of relevant information (24x36 landscape format)Continental United States Regional and Metropolitan District (24x36 landscape format)11x17 spreads (8 to 10 in InDesign) that present the results of the team’s research in theformat of a “chapter” for future publicationBelow is a non-exhaustive list of possible topics to research as they relate to their lenses (the lenses are fixed butthe topics can be expanded through each lens):Infrastructure: Federal, state, and municipal spending and deficit information; infrastructure failures and/orinvestments; locations and concentrations of public amenities such as parks, schools or libraries; publicservice centers; transportation systems and networks; water-related services (potable, grey, storm/run-off); etc.People: Migration and immigration; age groups shifts and trends; ageing and millennial concentrations; household incomes; concentrations of wealth and/or poverty; education levels, gender; race and ethnicity; healthindices; food deserts and/or commercial shopping destinations; etc.Ecologies: Local natural systems and phenomena; percentages of pervious / impervious surfaces;biodiversity and ecological integrity indices; air and/ or water pollution, wild-life regeneration and degradation;food and waste consumption; industries, agriculture and other production networks and quantities; soilquality; etc.Typologies: Urban patterns and form; retail and housing; cultural amenities; open-spaces; real-estatevalues and market influences; new construction patters, locations and character; big-box development, newmalls and aging/dead malls and/or commercial stock; employment centers; foreclosure numbers andconcentrations; architectural styles; typical massing, scale, volume, and/or square footage figures; etc.Technologies: Mobility; telecommunications and digital divides; concentrations of connectivity; networks;energy production and/or consumption; renewables and/or recycling; industries and production networks;innovative employment centers; knowledge centers; etc.New New Urbanism4

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)Phase 1.A: Suburban Site AnalysisUsing the South Monroe Corridor as our case study site, document and analyze the existing conditions of thearea. Reinvent the traditional SWOT Analysis and Identify Opportunity Sites for Intervention.Use the same formatting strategy established for your first set of presentation materials.1x Poster1x Poster1x Map1xSetStatistical info-graphics of relevant information (24x36 landscape format); these shouldreference the research lenses from Phase 1.DNA samples from the South Monroe CorridorSite in Context and Key Sites for Intervention11x17 spreads (6 to 8 in InDesign) that present the results of the team’s research in theformat of a “chapter” for future publicationInfrastructure: Federal, state, and municipal spending and deficit information; infrastructure failures and/orinvestments; locations and concentrations of public amenities such as parks, schools or libraries; publicservice centers; transportation systems and networks; water-related services (potable, grey, storm/run-off); etc.People: Migration and immigration; age groups shifts and trends; ageing and millennial concentrations; household incomes; concentrations of wealth and/or poverty; education levels, gender; race and ethnicity; healthindices; food deserts and/or commercial shopping destinations; etc.Ecologies: Local natural systems and phenomena; percentages of pervious / impervious surfaces;biodiversity and ecological integrity indices; air and/ or water pollution, wild-life regeneration and degradation;food and waste consumption; industries, agriculture and other production networks and quantities; soilquality; etc.Typologies: Urban patterns and form; retail and housing; cultural amenities; open-spaces; real-estate valuesand market influences; new construction patters, locations and character; big-box development, new malls andaging/dead malls and/or commercial stock; employment centers; foreclosure numbers and concentrations;architectural styles; typical massing, scale, volume, and/or square footage figures; etc.Technologies: Mobility; telecommunications and digital divides; concentrations of connectivity; networks;energy production and/or consumption; renewables and/or recycling; industries and production networks;innovative employment centers; knowledge centers; etc.SWOT: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Treats? Sweet spots, what ifs, openings, transitions .New New Urbanism5

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)Phase II: New New Urbanism (sub)Urban PrototypingUsing the information from Phase I, each team will produce a schematic design that responds to thestudio’s collective research and that speculates upon the future of suburban landscapes in the US usingTallahassee as a model.Charrettes: Sept. 9-10, 16-17, Oct. 7-8 (Tentative)On site (FAMU) charrette dates will be announced and Gamez will be in studio for collaborative designworkshops during which each team will propose, develop, revise, and elaborate their visions forTallahassee’s new urban futures. Building upon the work from Phase I, each team will produce a 10minute slide presentation (20 slides maximum plus a written narrative of 1000 words) that will be used tokick-off each charrette visit; these presentations should reference the research lenses explored by thefull studio, highlight how those data have influenced a set of design strategies, and indicate how thosestrategies translate to implementation phases on a given site.Students will also be responsible for the preparation of material such as base-maps, site photos, andrelevant documentation prior to each charrette as in professional public presentation settings.For the initial and final schematic design charrettes, teams will produce:1x Site Model (all teams, scale TBA)1x P lan District / Network / Urban Scale (1:500)1x Plan Site / Detail Scale (1:250)2x Site Sections (1:250)1x Set of Diagrams Existing DNA, Actions that will lead to transformations in the urban environment (think:verb like “mix”) Intervention “Ingredients” and Proposed “Edited” DNA, and Tools1x Programming and Phasing Strategy Diagram3x V ie ws Proposal in Schematic Design1000 word – Written description of strategy and proposalNew New Urbanism6

Florida A&M University School of Architecture EngineeringTechnologyDivision of Architecture: ARC 6373 Urban Design Studio Fall 2018 (6 credits)New New Urbanism: Rethinking Density, Landscape Suburbia (6 Credits)Visiting Studio Critic: Jose’ Gamez., PhD. Associate Director-School of Architecture Interim Director-Master of Urban Design Program, UNCCharlotteMaster of Architecture (71181)21st Century Design Topics to Consider:Age-less Mobility: To address the needs of aging communities or to retrofit suburban conditions foraging groups, especially as it relates to mobility needs.Biophilic & Metabolic Open Spaces-Zero-Waste Water and Food: Propose